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Per the Patristic interpretation of this passage, Christ's yoke is humility and meekness (see Matthew 11:29). Theophylact wrote: For he who humbles himself before all men has rest and remains untroubled; but he who is vainglorious and arrogant is ever encompassed by by troubles as he does not wish to be less than anyone but is always thinking how to ...


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In an encouraging article of the December 15 2001 watchtower magazine a discussion on this scripture about the kindly yoke said in part: Back then, a common man might have felt as though he were working under a yoke. From ancient times, the yoke had been illustrative of slavery or servitude. (Genesis 27:40; Leviticus 26:13; Deuteronomy 28:48) Many of ...


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The bottom line of my answer is that John is factually accurate and that he intentionally deviated from the Synoptics for the purpose of noting important theological meaning, not for the sake of dating accuracy itself. There are two possible chronologies, which I will call C14 and C15. C14: Crucifixion on 14 Nisan. It implies, with Nisan dates reckoned as ...


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The estimation of the year of Jesus' birth depends on the estimation of the year of Herod's death. The information to date the latter event is provided by Flavius Josephus in his Antiquities of the Jews, book 17 [1]. In 17.6.4, when narrating events leading to Herod's last times, he notes an event involving the high priest Matthias ben Theophilus: Now ...



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