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God did promise the land of Canaan to Abraham. For example God says to Abram (Abraham) in Genesis 17:8: The whole land of Canaan, where you now reside as a foreigner, I will give as an everlasting possession to you and your descendants after you; and I will be their God. However, a few verses earlier, God said that Abraham would be "the father of ...


8

"Why did God choose Israel?" appears as a common question among some Christians. For example, we had entire sermons for weeks based on this one question. Enough of that now, to the answer! God chose Israel because of His promise to Abraham. In Genesis, as a reward for his faith in the Lord, God said to him in Genesis 12:2-3: I will make you a great ...


6

Throughout the narrative parts of the Old Testament, there is very little mention of any afterlife. That idea arises mostly later on, in the books of the Prophets. During the bulk of Old Testament times, salvation had little or nothing to do with: Heaven or the afterlife, since there was little or no belief in such a thing. Being freed from the curse of ...


4

There are three principal interpretations of this passage among Protestants and Catholics. "All Israel" might refer to: A future large-scale conversion of Jewish people to Christianity All the Jewish people elected by God All the people of God, both Gentiles and Jews The first of these views is easily the most popular, and is widely held by ...


3

There are several passages that suggest an answer; in particular Deuteronomy 8:2–3: 2 And you shall remember the whole way that the Lord your God has led you these forty years in the wilderness, that he might humble you, testing you to know what was in your heart, whether you would keep his commandments or not. 3 And he humbled you and let you hunger and ...


2

Four distinct nations First, it's important to understand that each of the four nations (other than Israel) mentioned here is distinct from the others, though they did have various interrelationships. Here are their origins in the Hebrew Table of Nations, and their territories at the time of the conquest of the Holy Land. It is surprisingly difficult to ...


2

There are inscriptions found in Kuntillet Ajtud and a further inscription found scratched on bedrock in a tomb at Khirbet el-Qom in Judah, that appear to say the goddess Asherah was considered to be the wife of Yahweh. The first of these was discovered in 1975, when Tel Aviv University archaeologist Ze’ev Meshel decided to excavate at remote Kuntillet ‘Ajrud ...


2

Yes, during Jesus' lifetime, coins in the Roman Empire bore the likeness of the Emperor - who happened to be Augustus, also known as Tiberius, for most of Jesus' life. These are actual Roman coins from Jesus' lifetime, bearing the image of Augustus Cæsar. - Source Contrary to popular belief, coins bearing the image of a pagan were not inherently ...


2

Certain numbers had symbolic significance to the people of that era. Numbers like 7 and 12 had connotations of wholeness or completeness. (Not completely unlike modern-ish phrases like going the "whole 9 yards"). Bible numbers The 12 tribes were established from the 12 sons of Israel/Jacob, who was himself the son of Isaac, who was the promised son of ...


1

Twelve = Abundant Completeness of God's Blessings The number twelve is suggestive of abundant completeness, particularly in terms of blessings (as opposed to the number 40, which is usually associated with complete punishment or adversity, e.g. the flood, Moses' exile from Egypt, years wandering in the wilderness, Jesus' fasting in the wilderness, Jewish ...


1

There is a specific line of succession starting from Abraham with whom the covenant is re-established. First to Abraham: Genesis 15:8: In that same day the Lord made a covenant with Abram, saying, Unto thy seed have I given this land, form the river of Egypt unto the great river, the river Euphrates: Then to Isaac: Genesis 17:21: But my covenant ...


1

The Land: The twelve tribes were descendent from and culturally identified with the twelve sons of Israel (i.e. Jacob), so it makes sense that the land they occupied was know as the land of Israel rather than the land of Abraham. The Man: Israel probably means something like "who fights with God", which is obviously appropriate for Jacob. Biblically this ...


1

Simply put: the public reading offered during Nehemiah’s reforms was from Deuteronomy, not Numbers. Compare the texts below for their several parallels. As the old stories were told in Deuteronomy, the Ammonites – not the Midianites, as in Numbers – collaborated with the Moabites against the ancient Israelites. Nehemiah likely chose the passage from ...


1

The history of these peoples are extremely closely tied together. The first thing that should be noted about the passage that you cite is that it speaks of the land of Midian, and not the Midianite people group. The reason that this is important is that land of Midian was the very same land occupied by the Amorites and Moabites. The 1906 Jewish ...


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Here is a response to this part of the question: When the names of the tribes were written, for example Exodus 28:21, how would the list appear? Would Joseph be written in place of Manasseh and Ephraim or would Levi be omitted? Here is Exodus 28:21 (NRSV): There shall be twelve stones with names corresponding to the names of the sons of ...


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There are two related but distinct biblical issues here. The first is whether the land belongs permanently and unconditionally to the Jews. The second is whether the creation of the modern state of Israel fulfils a prophecy. One does not necessarily follow from the other, since it need not have been God's intention that a Jewish state be set up in the Middle ...



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