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There are several issues you bring up that need to be addressed in this question, and it is going to take a little space. Only Israel? You are correct in your assumption that God loves the whole world and not just Israel. However, Israel was, indeed, specifically chosen as part of God's plan to proclaim His name throughout the world. Here is a general ...


8

You kind of tipped your hand by using the word ideology in your question! An unscriptural ideology is at the heart of a deficient theology regarding Israel and the Christian Church. (By Church, with a capital C, I'm referring to the universal or "holy catholic" church, which is composed of all true believers in Jesus Christ.) There Is No Legitimate Argument ...


6

The primary distinction which you will find among protestants regarding this matter will arise from the division between those adhering to Covenant Theology and those adhering to Dispensationalism. Under Covenant Theology, the members of the modern-day church are viewed as the true children of Israel. The promises made to Abraham regarding his descendants, ...


5

"Why did God choose Israel?" appears as a common question among some Christians. For example, we had entire sermons for weeks based on this one question. Enough of that now, to the answer! God chose Israel because of His promise to Abraham. In Genesis, as a reward for his faith in the Lord, God said to him in Genesis 12:2-3: I will make you a great ...


5

The promises made to Israel were conditional promises. He had plans for them if they obeyed and kept His Holy Commandments. The rest of the nations were supposed to see Israel and come to God through their example. 'Now then, if you will indeed obey My voice and keep My covenant, then you shall be My own possession among all the peoples, for all the ...


3

Like most of his contemporaries, Luther understood the Jews to be evil. Anti-semitism was common in that era and was unremarkable. Jews, as spawn of the Devil (and I'm purposely getting into character here, not espousing this!) were creatures to be pitied at best and disposed of when they got in the way. The title of his book On Jews and Their Lies gives ...


3

As per dictionary.com, here are two of the definitions of "mandate": a command from a superior court or official to a lower one. an authoritative order or command: a royal mandate. Keep that in mind. Now, as david brainerd mentioned, the International House Of Prayer (IHOP) has a page named "Israel Mandate". As there are only a couple ...


2

In context, the list refers to the remnant that was protected from the '6th seal'. Here are two brief commentaries on it: Resources » The IVP New Testament Commentary Series » John's list does not match exactly any of the traditional lists of the tribes of Israel (for example, Gen 35:23-26; 49:1-28; Deut 33:6-25), either in the names or in the order of ...


2

There are actually 14 tribes if you consider Ephraim and Manasseh as additional tribes, but this is an abberation in my opinion since Ephraim inherited his father's portion so there were 13. Levi was not given land, his offspring being the priests. As you indicated Joseph received extra share of land which I suspect is what allowed Manasseh to separate ...


2

All of Romans 9-11 should be read together. Paul was responding to the accusation that God's promises to Israel had failed, and his response is basically: "you misunderstand what God means by 'Israel'; it is only the remnant of Israel's natural descendants that count as 'Israel', so actually, all Israel will be saved and God's promises have not failed".


2

I hope these numbers 673 and 674 in the Catechism of the Catholic Church shed some light The glorious advent of Christ, the hope of Israel 673 Since the Ascension Christ's coming in glory has been imminent,[cf. Rev 22:20]. even though "it is not for you to know times or seasons which the Father has fixed by his own authority."[cf. (Acts 1:7; Cf. ...


2

I'll focus on the first question which relates to the identity of Israel. The Bible focuses on Israel, because Israel is the Church. The Bible is about God's creation of the world and His promise of redeeming His fallen creation through the Christ. In Genesis 3:15, after Adam and Eve sinned and brought death and evil into the world, God promises a Savior, ...


2

In the Teachings of Jesus and the writings of the Apostles, there is a common theme of the world that represents an established system that is separate from and foreign to Messiah. John 14:16-18 And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another co-minister, that he should abide with you into the ages: the Spirit of Truth, whom the world is not ...


1

This question reminds me of the "felix culpa" ("happy fault [of Adam]")¹ question of whether Christ would have become incarnate had Adam not sinned. If Adam had not sinned, how could've God worked greater goods? Similarly in the case of the fall of the Jews: If the Jews had not fallen, how could there be "the salvation of the Gentiles by means of the death ...


1

REPLACED OR REDIFINED? When we talk about ‘replacement theology’, we are using very emotive language. The idea that God has ‘replaced’ Israel with the (largely gentile) Church, suggests a betrayal’ of the promises made by God to the patriarchs. Therefore, the word ‘replacement’ may not be the best one to use to describe what God is doing through the ...


1

There are two related but distinct biblical issues here. The first is whether the land belongs permanently and unconditionally to the Jews. The second is whether the creation of the modern state of Israel fulfils a prophecy. One does not necessarily follow from the other, since it need not have been God's intention that a Jewish state be set up in the Middle ...


1

Your question reveals one of the most misunderstood issue in the Bible, as the church sees itself as the successor of Israel. For the most part, Evangelical Christendom believes in a pre-tribulation rapture (see Left Behind series) originating from Nelson John Darby of the Plymouth brethren, who are also responsible for Dispensationalism. In this idea, ...


1

My answer is from a Seventh Day Adventist perspective, a subset of the protestant view: The church is not yet the kingdom In Daniel 2, prophecy depicts a succession of kingdoms, ending with a stone that breaks into pieces all the other kingdoms of the world and rules forever. God's kingdom will not be established until the kingdoms of the world are done ...


1

There is only one kingdom because there is only one king. The kingdom was offered to Israel and not accepted at that time. The kingdom will come and a remnant of Israel will glady receive her king. Gentiles were being added to the kingdom during the period of Acts. This was a mystery that Paul describes had been hidden. The end of Mark describes a ...


1

The moment I read your question, one passage jumped into my thoughts almost immediately. It's a favorite. Romans 8:28-39 NIV "All things work together for good." (vs 28) A often quoted passage. It doesn't promise us that we'll avoid bad things altogether. But it does give us assurance that in the end whatever we endure will be worth it. Just like in ...


1

We will literally never know without a time machine. However, given the region and it's history, as well as the people living there today it's reasonable to assert that they were a mix of all types of skin tones ranging from the typical Israeli today to the darker toned Northern African people today. The closest example to a "typical" Hamitic person is ...


1

I have read your question the answers and the comments over and thought I might answer the original question with my observations. Why does the Old Testament talk mainly about the Nation of Israel? If we take the Old testament by itself we do not see the purpose of those revelations. But on the other hand, when we take the Old Testament in relationship to ...


1

Short answer: The bible focuses on Israel because it was the mechanism that God chose to use to bring Jesus into the world in his bodily form and thus bring about atonement for every people group. The calling of Abram / Abraham that is the start of the line leading to Christ is placed right after the story of the tower of Babel (with a list of descendants ...


1

Part of the last paragraph in entry the Pharisees on New Advent has: [T]he extreme faction of the Sadducees, known as the Herodians, was in sympathy with the foreign rulers and pagan culture, and even looked forward to a restoration of the national kingdom under one of the descendants of King Herod. Yet we find the Pharisees making common cause ...



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