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God did promise the land of Canaan to Abraham. For example God says to Abram (Abraham) in Genesis 17:8: The whole land of Canaan, where you now reside as a foreigner, I will give as an everlasting possession to you and your descendants after you; and I will be their God. However, a few verses earlier, God said that Abraham would be "the father of ...


8

You kind of tipped your hand by using the word ideology in your question! An unscriptural ideology is at the heart of a deficient theology regarding Israel and the Christian Church. (By Church, with a capital C, I'm referring to the universal or "holy catholic" church, which is composed of all true believers in Jesus Christ.) There Is No Legitimate Argument ...


6

Throughout the narrative parts of the Old Testament, there is very little mention of any afterlife. That idea arises mostly later on, in the books of the Prophets. During the bulk of Old Testament times, salvation had little or nothing to do with: Heaven or the afterlife, since there was little or no belief in such a thing. Being freed from the curse of ...


6

The primary distinction which you will find among protestants regarding this matter will arise from the division between those adhering to Covenant Theology and those adhering to Dispensationalism. Under Covenant Theology, the members of the modern-day church are viewed as the true children of Israel. The promises made to Abraham regarding his descendants, ...


5

"Why did God choose Israel?" appears as a common question among some Christians. For example, we had entire sermons for weeks based on this one question. Enough of that now, to the answer! God chose Israel because of His promise to Abraham. In Genesis, as a reward for his faith in the Lord, God said to him in Genesis 12:2-3: I will make you a great ...


3

Like most of his contemporaries, Luther understood the Jews to be evil. Anti-semitism was common in that era and was unremarkable. Jews, as spawn of the Devil (and I'm purposely getting into character here, not espousing this!) were creatures to be pitied at best and disposed of when they got in the way. The title of his book On Jews and Their Lies gives ...


2

Certain numbers had symbolic significance to the people of that era. Numbers like 7 and 12 had connotations of wholeness or completeness. (Not completely unlike modern-ish phrases like going the "whole 9 yards"). Bible numbers The 12 tribes were established from the 12 sons of Israel/Jacob, who was himself the son of Isaac, who was the promised son of ...


2

There are three principal interpretations of this passage among Protestants and Catholics. "All Israel" might refer to: A future large-scale conversion of Jewish people to Christianity All the Jewish people elected by God All the people of God, both Gentiles and Jews The first of these views is easily the most popular, and is widely held by ...


1

Twelve = Abundant Completeness of God's Blessings The number twelve is suggestive of abundant completeness, particularly in terms of blessings (as opposed to the number 40, which is usually associated with complete punishment or adversity, e.g. the flood, Moses' exile from Egypt, years wandering in the wilderness, Jesus' fasting in the wilderness, Jewish ...


1

There is a specific line of succession starting from Abraham with whom the covenant is re-established. First to Abraham: Genesis 15:8: In that same day the Lord made a covenant with Abram, saying, Unto thy seed have I given this land, form the river of Egypt unto the great river, the river Euphrates: Then to Isaac: Genesis 17:21: But my covenant ...


1

The Land: The twelve tribes were descendent from and culturally identified with the twelve sons of Israel (i.e. Jacob), so it makes sense that the land they occupied was know as the land of Israel rather than the land of Abraham. The Man: Israel probably means something like "who fights with God", which is obviously appropriate for Jacob. Biblically this ...


1

This question reminds me of the "felix culpa" ("happy fault [of Adam]")¹ question of whether Christ would have become incarnate had Adam not sinned. If Adam had not sinned, how could've God worked greater goods? Similarly in the case of the fall of the Jews: If the Jews had not fallen, how could there be "the salvation of the Gentiles by means of the death ...


1

REPLACED OR REDIFINED? When we talk about ‘replacement theology’, we are using very emotive language. The idea that God has ‘replaced’ Israel with the (largely gentile) Church, suggests a betrayal’ of the promises made by God to the patriarchs. Therefore, the word ‘replacement’ may not be the best one to use to describe what God is doing through the ...


1

Here is a response to this part of the question: When the names of the tribes were written, for example Exodus 28:21, how would the list appear? Would Joseph be written in place of Manasseh and Ephraim or would Levi be omitted? Here is Exodus 28:21 (NRSV): There shall be twelve stones with names corresponding to the names of the sons of ...


1

There are two related but distinct biblical issues here. The first is whether the land belongs permanently and unconditionally to the Jews. The second is whether the creation of the modern state of Israel fulfils a prophecy. One does not necessarily follow from the other, since it need not have been God's intention that a Jewish state be set up in the Middle ...


1

My answer is from a Seventh Day Adventist perspective, a subset of the protestant view: The church is not yet the kingdom In Daniel 2, prophecy depicts a succession of kingdoms, ending with a stone that breaks into pieces all the other kingdoms of the world and rules forever. God's kingdom will not be established until the kingdoms of the world are done ...


1

There is only one kingdom because there is only one king. The kingdom was offered to Israel and not accepted at that time. The kingdom will come and a remnant of Israel will glady receive her king. Gentiles were being added to the kingdom during the period of Acts. This was a mystery that Paul describes had been hidden. The end of Mark describes a ...



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