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35

The simplest place to start is that Muslims view Jesus as a man with a special role as prophet. Christians view him as God himself in the flesh (incarnate). To Muslims, the idea that God had a son is blasphemy. Even though Christians view him as one in the same being (as a person in the Trinity) and thus still hold the idea of God being one, that concept ...


34

Muḥammad has absolutely no role in Christianity and is never referred to in the Christian Bible. The first παράκλητος ("Comforter") was Jesus Christ. In 1 John 2:1, it is written, My little children, I write these things to you so that you do not sin. And if anyone sins, we have a comforter (παράκλητον) with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous. ...


31

To our Muslim friends, please do not be offended: Christianity has no official view on Mohammed or the Quran, nor could it because Mohammed and the Quran came about hundreds of years after Christianity. Christians do have opinions though. To most Christians, Mohammad is no different than any other non-christian who started a religion. They are false ...


28

The so called "Evil Eye" is a classic example of spiritual syncretism. It's origin is neither Christian nor Muslim — yet the belief system that it stands for has through long proximity been partially assimilated by adherents to both of of those religions. It goes several names, but for example in Turkey it is usually known as Nazar. It is simply a symbol, ...


27

No, it is not compatible. The Qur'an explicitly denies the divinity of Christ, which is one of the absolute bedrock tenets of the Christian faith. Without His divinity and associated sinlessness Christ's sacrifice and resurrection would carry no meaning or effect. One additional note: I ran across this article today and I thought it would round out this ...


24

Here are the differences: Christianity Jesus is God. Jesus died and rose again to save the world from all their sins. Jesus is the way to eternity in heaven. Islam Jesus is not God, he was just a good prophet. Jesus did not rise again. a. He was never crucified, nor would God ever let one of his prophets die in such a fashion. Jesus does not save us. ...


24

Islam isn't, nor has it been considered a Christian sect, either by Muslims, or by Christians. An article here argues that Islam is a Christian Heresy: Belloc states "It began as a heresy, not as a new religion....It was a perversion of the Christian religion...an adaptation and a misuse of the Christian thing." But there is a distinction to be ...


21

It's not even a Christian perspective that's needed. It's a historical one. Christianity sprang from Judaism, and Judaism and Islam share common roots. All three are known as "Abrahamic religions" because they trace their history to the covenant God made with Abraham in the Hebrew Bible. All of the events you listed were from before Abraham. Talmudic ...


19

I'll start with what Christian views I know the Qur'an explicitly denies. Trinity Qur'an 4:171 O People of the Scripture, do not commit excess in your religion or say about Allah except the truth. The Messiah, Jesus, the son of Mary, was but a messenger of Allah and His word which He directed to Mary and a soul [created at a command] from Him. So ...


17

Muslims may not appreciate (or perhaps they would) this distinction. But Hilare Belloc claims in The Great Heresies, that Islam is a heresy of Christianity. Therefore, if Mohammed had had a vague inkling of Christianity and claim the inheritance of Ishmael then yeah, of course they worship the same God. However, we couldn't say they worship Him fully ...


17

From a Christian perspective, there is no role for Mohammed in the Bible. "The comforter" is believed to be the Holy Spirit. From Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible and he shall give you another Comforter. This is no inconsiderable proof of a trinity of persons in the Godhead; here is the Father prayed unto, the Son in human nature praying, and ...


15

Clearly not I do not think either a Christian or Muslim would hold to that. The only people who would like to think so are Universalists, but that is not really the orthodox position. John 14:6 (NIV) Jesus answered, “I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.


14

Another "historical approach" remark - there were some Christians in Arabia in Muhammad's times, so even if Muhammad was illiterate, he could ask some of his Christian neighbors and listen to the stories. But most of these "Christians" were not orthodox and many of them belonged to sects today refered to as gnostics, not Christians. Bible as we know it ...


12

The correct answer to this question is clearly … <err, not so fast> You see that's just the problem. Christianity doesn't have a clear unequivocal answer to this question that is broadly agreed on across traditions. Islam has now been around for about 1400 years promoting its ideas about the nature of God – who they usually claim is the same God ...


12

There is no consensus among Christians on this question. Assuming that the conversion is genuine and permanent, rather than momentary weakness, the three main schools of thought that apply to this issue are: Conditional Security According to this view, Christians can lose their salvation. Thus, a Christian who converted to another religion would be seen ...


12

The "prophet" Muhammad stated that the angel Gabriel visited him with revelation and he put great importance upon Gabriel. This is not true. Not if you are talking about the Koran, which never says this. This information comes from the Hadiths. If you were to base your understanding of Mohammed purely on his writings (i.e. the Koran) and not on the ...


11

Find the most dedicated Jew or Muslim and you probably won’t find anyone more dedicated to God under his moral Laws than the Apostle Paul before he became a Christian. Paul said he was blamelessly devoted to God before knowing Christ but after becoming a Christian he counted all that devotion as mere rubbish: If someone else thinks they have reasons to ...


11

Muslims believe Allah and Jehovah are One From the perspective of the Muslim, when they are praying to Allah, they believe they are praying to the same person whom Christians would call God. And do not dispute with the followers of the Book except by what is best, except those of them who act unjustly, and say: We believe in that which has been revealed ...


11

Prepare for your mind to be blown Mohammedanism was a heresy: that is the essential point to grasp before going any further. It began as a heresy, not as a new religion. It was not a pagan contrast with the Church; it was not an alien enemy. It was a perversion of Christian doctrine. It vitality and endurance soon gave it the appearance of a new ...


11

Although I presume this question will be closed, I'll answer anyway. A Christian who converts to any other religion, whether Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, etc., is considered a heretic and anathema. With respect to Muslims: while they confess Yeshu'a to be the Messiah (e.g., Sūratu Āli ʿImrān, āyah 45), they deny his 1) crucifixion, 2) atonement, 3) death, and ...


11

I would not be so sure to exclude any reference to Muhammad from the Bible. In fact there is a fairly mainstream historical view of Revelation that directly includes him as the leader of a Saracen invasion that invaded Christianity like a 'locust plague' in the seventh century. A review of the symbol and the history arguably describes the prophecy in an ...


9

I read in an early grade book written for Muslim children that "God has no son." Since the god they worship does not have a son, then we are not worshiping the same God, for the Christian God has the Son, Jesus Christ.


9

Realistically, there are just 4 possibilities: Christians and Moslems are praying to the same God. We all basically believe the same things and believe in the same God. Christians and Moslems are praying to the same God. One or the other (or both) have wrong and confused ideas about God, but God is understanding of our ignorance. There is more than one ...


8

From Wikipedia: The Dome of the Rock is located at the visual center of a platform known as the Temple Mount. It was constructed on the site of the Second Jewish Temple, which was destroyed during the Roman Siege of Jerusalem in 70 CE. In 637 CE, Jerusalem surrendered to the Rashidun Caliphate army during the Muslim conquest of Syria. ...


8

From what I know from speaking with those who have been missionaries in Islamic countries and from reading books written by such people, it seems that the strategy is not to demonstrate that Islam is incorrect, but to simply present Jesus (the prophet Isa) to people. Jesus is acknowledged as a prophet by Islam. The Koran on Jesus The Koran talks about ...


8

Hi and welcome to the site. Thanks for asking questions. You are correct when you write that the New Testament was written ABOUT Jesus. It was not written by him, at least not in the sense that he put pen to paper, or dictated the words. Your quote from Wikipedia, while it may correctly describe Muslim belief, certainly does not describe Christian belief on ...


7

I'd say that the site itself is important but the Dome of Rock is not. This site is believed to be the place where Abraham prepared to sacrifice his son Isaac. But this is only a Jewish tradition and hence not all Christians would agree with its importance. The Dome contains the following inscription (also from Wikipedia) - "So peace is upon me the day ...


7

Why not take a look at the same question from the Muslim perspective, which is actually very informative: http://islam.stackexchange.com/questions/357/how-does-muslim-teaching-on-the-person-of-jesus-differ-from-that-of-christian-te/361#comment8489_361 UPDATE: Muslims believe Jesus (Isa Masih): is the Word of God, Spirit of God and other similar titles ...


7

Muhammad had most likely been in contact with Christian and Jewish influences As a child/young man, Muhammad, whilst traveling on trading missions with his uncle to Syria, would have no doubt come into direct contact with Christians and Jews, or at the very least those who knew the traditions of those two religions in that part of the world at that time. ...


6

Both Christians and Muslims claim to worship the God of Abraham, so in that sense, we worship the same God. However, Christians believe that Jesus was God incarnate, while Muslims do not. So Christians worship Jesus and Muslims do not. So in that sense it's not fully accurate to say we worship the same God.



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