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11

The most usual passage cited is: 1 Samuel 1:11 (HCSB) 11 Making a vow, she pleaded, “LORD of Hosts, if You will take notice of Your servant’s affliction, remember and not forget me, and give Your servant a son, I will give him to the LORD all the days of his life, and his hair will never be cut.” 1 Samuel 1:23-28 (HCSB) 23 Her husband Elkanah ...


7

No, in Protestant understanding infant baptism does not in itself affect an infants' soul. The same goes for adult baptism actually. The rite of baptism itself is not seen as having any direct effect on the eternal status of the soul. It's primarily a visible acknowledgement that God has made a promise and a reminder of how Christs atonement works. In the ...


5

All salvation is inherently unjust. No one deserves salvation. Eph 2:1-9 (NASB) And you were dead in your trespasses and sins, in which you formerly walked according to the course of this world, according to the prince of the power of the air, of the spirit that is now working in the sons of disobedience. Among them we too all formerly lived in the ...


5

Firstly, we need to know that God is just and fair. God is just: He will pay back trouble to those who trouble you. (2 Thessalonians 1:6, NIV) But you are stubborn and refuse to turn to God. So you are making things even worse for yourselves on that day when he will show how angry he is and will judge the world with fairness. (Romans 2:5, ...


5

The color white is primarily symbolic of the pure state of the baby's/adult's soul along with the renewal of life after being cleansed of original sin by the Holy Spirit. But as with all symbolism, there are many more things associated with the color (according to Wikipedia): According to surveys in Europe and the United States, white is the color most ...


5

I'll address the two main questions from a Roman Catholic perspective: Question 1: Does baptizing the baby have anything to do with the destination of the infant’s soul? Short answer: Yes. Long answer: Baptism is normally a prerequisite for entering heaven, BUT There are other forms of baptism besides water baptism, AND At least one of those (the ...


4

This answer is not meant to replace the other well stated answers, but is meant to supplement/support them by addressing the following question: Which denomination(s) believes that infant baptism is a mean of securing the afterlife of the baby? Catholics, Eastern and Oriental Orthodox, Anglicans, Lutherans, Presbyterians, Methodists, some Nazarenes, ...


3

Jesus' remarks were that those who would receive his teachings would be like little children. Also see the Beatitudes, which provides more detail about the simple childlike faith (my words) of those that would receive him (meek, pure in heart, peacemakers, etc.). The Kingdom of God belongs to those who can accept Christ in the same way a little child simply ...


2

It's instructive here to look at the etymology of "christening". It is, obviously, derived from the word Christ. Here's what the Online Etymology Dictionary has to say about christen: christen (v.) c.1200, from Old English cristnian "to baptize," literally "to make Christian," from cristen "Christian". General meaning of "to name" is attested from ...


2

I'd say not, but this is just my opinion, and not because I've ever heard of Ex Opere Operato so I'll keep this short and hopefully someone adds a better answer. But Baptism leaves an indelible mark: Incorporated into Christ by Baptism, the person baptized is configured to Christ. Baptism seals the Christian with the indelible spiritual mark ...


1

Calvin puts his own view on the subject most directly in a section of his institutes of religion called “Paedobaptism. Its accordance with the institution of Christ, and the nature of the sign.” In this section he is arguing for the case of infant baptism and one of the arguments from the Anabaptists was that why should you baptize an infant who can’t have ...



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