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31

For the quick answer to your question, see John 1:1, 14. But really, this is a simple matter of the transitive property. Jesus forgives sin (Mark 2:1-12): It's a non-debated point of doctrine that only God can forgive sins. It's easy for the modern reader to marvel at the miracle without realizing the greater significance of Jesus' statement. Jesus here ...


13

St Thomas Aquinas asks in Summa Theologica 3.1.3, "If man had not sinned, would God nevertheless have become incarnate?" (Latin: Si homo non peccasset, nihilominus Deus incarnatum fuisset?). His answer is "no", while acknowledging that God could have still chosen to become incarnate for other reasons; although he recognizes a diversity of thought on the ...


12

The problem that you run into is John 1 - in which it says of Jesus, that by him all things were made, and there is nothing that was made that He didn't make. This is why the Nicene Creed is so careful to say he was begotten not made. If God the Father made Jesus, then John made a boo-boo. The incarnation, on the other hand, is merely putting flesh to that ...


11

Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger (as he then was) wrote about this article of the creed for the Mariological Congress in March 1995. The essay is reprinted in Mary: the church at the source by him and Hans Urs von Balthasar (Ignatius Press, 2005). He speaks about the centrality of the incarnation to Christian faith: In manifesting himself, God shows that he is ...


10

The chapter below is titled "The Government of the Promised Son" and seems to answer your question regarding Jesus, the Son, being God. Isaiah 9:6 "For unto us a Child is born, Unto us a Son is given; And the government will be upon His shoulder. And the government will be upon His shoulder. And His name will be called Wonderful, Counselor, Mighty ...


8

Signs in tradition and scripture, can have two basic senses. In the first sense, they are often miraculous indicators of the speaker's trustworthiness, which encourage the listener to believe. In the second sense, they embody or represent a larger or more transcendent truth. The general formula for signs in my first sense is that the speaker first delivers a ...


7

Once - in two different ways depending on our definition of 'begotten' There seems to be some confusion on the subject because "only begotten" a theological term does not mean "begotten" a biblical term. But to answer your question, if thinking 'begotten' as in 'only begotten' it gains prominence in Council of Nicaea in A.D. 325 representing Christ’s ...


6

Part of the reason seems to have been wanting to minimize the drive to direct the Messiah toward worldly goals. Many people wanted a worldly king, e.g., John 6:15 (NIV): Jesus, knowing that they intended to come and make him king by force, withdrew again into the hills by himself. and there was a desire for "bread and circuses" (well full stomachs and ...


6

In historical Christian belief (of almost any type), it would be considered heresy to say that God the Son was created. You can use a neat term here "nicene christianity". Regarding your question - Christ has a complete human nature (human body and human soul) and this nature is created. Christ has accepted our nature with all sinless weaknesses of ...


6

All three persons of the Trinity are in a perichoretic union. Hence, the Holy Spirit is called the Spirit of the Father (Matt. 10:20 cp. Mark 13:11) and the Spirit of the Son (Gal. 4:6), yet there are still three persons of the Trinity (Matt. 28:19). The Son said, "I and my Father are one" (John 10:30), to which the Jews picked up stones in order to stone ...


5

For a God who always seeks to woo and not to overwhelm, this is exactly what you would expect. God could, if he chose, bring more power to bear than any of us could handle. He could force himself into everything, if that were His nature. But, as a person (not a force) who seeks to love and be loved for who He is, this makes perfect sense. As King Henry ...


5

Human nature entails a human soul. When Christ became man, every aspect of His human nature was created: It is to be remembered that, when the Word took Flesh, there was no change in the Word; all the change was in the Flesh. At the moment of conception, in the womb of the Blessed Mother, through the forcefulness of God's activity, not only was the ...


5

Humans can never become God because God alone is (1) inherently immortal (1 Tim. 1:17, 6:16) and (2) uncreated. God created all things (Eph. 3:9); therefore, anything created (which includes humans) is not God nor can it become God. However, humans (specifically, Christians) can be "sharers in the divine nature" (θείας κοινωνοὶ φύσεως) when they receive the ...


4

As is so often the case with questions such as yours, it's not a matter of "either/or" but "both/and." Let's put it this way: the comparison between the church universal ("the holy catholic Church"--the Apostles' Creed) and a body is both an analogy and a metaphor. The expression of the church as a body is presented perhaps no more clearly than in 1 ...


4

In Trinitarian orthodoxy, יהוה (YHVH), commonly referred to as "the Tetragrammaton," is the name of God. The Father is God, and thus, the name of the Father is YHVH. The Son is God, and thus, the name of the Son is YHVH. The Holy Spirit is God, and thus, the name of the Holy Spirit is YHVH. As there is only one God, there is only one name יהוה shared by ...


4

On other "virgin births" predating the concept of a virgin birth in Christianity: The notion of the virgin birth in Christianity predates the actual birth of Christ too; it was prophesied explicitly some centuries earlier. Certainly in Isaiah, we have: Isaiah 7:14 (MSG): So the Master is going to give you a sign anyway. Watch for this: A girl who is ...


4

Galatians 3 and 4 explains how God sought to lay a foundation for the coming of the Messiah, through the Jewish Law. The Law was to make people understand the depth of their sinfulness (in that they were incapable of keeping the Law) so that they might more readily accept the cure for that sin through Jesus the Messiah (Galatians 3:22-23; Romans 3:19-20). ...


4

Aquinas addresses the question from different angles a number of places in the Summa Theologica, in various parts of the "Treatise on the Most Holy Trinity" (First Part, Questions 27–43). The fundamental question is answered more or less directly in Question 27, "The Procession of the Divine Persons". Article 2 of this question, "Whether any ...


3

We do not know. We only know that He came at the appropriate time. Galatians 4:4-5: 4 But when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son, born of a woman, born under the law, 5 to ransom those under the law, so that we might receive adoption. From this we know the well-known facts that at the time of His coming: His mother, Mary, born of Saint ...


3

Just a Christmas treat for those who enjoy this sort of thing. Of course finding the infant, as lead by the star shining over the animal house, wrapped up and placed in a feeding-trough (φάτνη) is a striking thing to see. The contrast of this earthly, helpless child to the heralding angelic glory announcing his birth is breathtaking to say the least. But ...


2

Thanks to Andrew Leach and his link to Catechism. I'll try to build upon it: Born of the Virgin Mary, he has truly been made one of us, like to us in all things except sin. Jesus was (and still is) similar to us in everything except for sin. We humans are God's creation, and we have always been God's creation. Our reason, our feelings, everything ...


2

My answer on a related question covers much the same ground. I like this question better, because it is more generic, but the specifics of that answer still hold true here. Key points: God desires 1 sacrifice, and 1 sacrifice only, for all time (Heb 10) God chose to come "at the right time to die for the ungodly" (Gal 4) Too early, and people wouldn't ...


2

Your can read the whole chapter about this in "An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith" of saint John of Damascus (675-749 AD). He said: When, then, we speak of His divinity we do not ascribe to it the properties of humanity. For we do not say that His divinity is subject to passion or created. Nor, again, do we predicate of His flesh or of His ...


1

According to Schaff's history, Athanasius wrote Against Apollinaris about the year 372 against Apollinarianism in the wider sense, without naming, Apollinaris or his followers; so that the title above given is wanting in the oldest codices. Similar errors, though in like manner without direct reference to Apollinaris, and evading his most important ...


1

To take your second question first: was Mary Jesus' biological mother, or was she a surrogate? According to the vast majority of Christian churches, Mary was in every way the mother of the human being Jesus Christ. So yes, she was his biological mother. He was genuinely Mary's son, as you see confessed time and time again in the creeds, confessions and ...


1

With or without Mary, God does what he intends to do. God tells us so at Isaiah 55:11 "So my word that goes out of my mouth will be. It will not return to me without results, But it will certainly accomplish whatever is my delight, And it will have sure success in what I send it to do." If Mary had not found favor in gods eyes, she would not have ...


1

I don't imagine you'll find a fulfilling philosophical answer to this, since that would entail explaining Christianity's fundamental mystery. Namely, Jesus Christ is both fully divine and fully human. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qX7q3yDoFD0 Humans are created. Jesus is fully human. Therefore, Jesus is, in the manner relevant to humans, created. If this ...


1

From my understanding, nothing was created at the Incarnation. Jesus always existed, body was created long ago. Here is a thorough Catholic answer on the nature of body, soul and incarnation on YouTube. To summarize the video, there is no separate body and soul in a Cartesian sense. This is a fabrication of the modern world that causes a lot of confusion. ...


1

Jesus came during the time of the Romana Pax, which is a time when Rome was at peace. If he came during there was a lot of war, when people beg him to help with defense, what would he say?, because if he kills one man, even if he is evil, he will not be perfect anymore and dieing wouldn't do anything. If he didn't defend, either he wouldn't have died on the ...


1

One classical definition widely accepted among Christians : God is a pure spirit, infinitely perfect, creator and ruler of all things and beeings. 1)There are a lot of explanations, please focus on one or some theologies. One would have to start from the original sin. One explanation is that the world had to be somehow prepared. And God doesn't send ...



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