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13

Why do churches like the Catholic Church permit icons when idolatry is forbidden? The simple answer is that they do not consider all images to be idols (just think of photographs), and believe that members of the Church are able to distinguish between a work of art and God without the need for direct enforcement: after all, Catholics believe that the ...


8

Yes, there are lots of examples! There are still professional Iconographers who go around painting Iconography for a living! In the Orthodox Church the Temples are traditionally fully covered in frescoes. Here is an example: Since this is a great part of the Orthodox Church, there are many people who have been trained in this Holy Art and are going around ...


6

The oldest icon I can imagine would be the one written by St Luke of Our Lady holding the infant Jesus regardless of whether you give any merit to the tradition that it was indeed done by him who was undoubtably the most well aquatinted man in the early Church with the Blessed Virgin Mary, excepting maybe St John the Evangelist, it is certainly an old ...


6

According to Gibbons: the public religion of the Catholics was uniformly simple and spiritual; and the first notice of the use of pictures is in the censure of the council of Illiberis, three hundred years after the Christian aera. Under the successors of Constantine, in the peace and luxury of the triumphant church, the more prudent bishops condescended ...


5

There are certainly modern iconographers. I have a small icon I bought in Walsingham (in Norfolk, UK), which is painted and uses gold leaf in the traditional Orthodox style. Not a particularly good photo of it, but here it is: about 8" × 5". And Sergei Fyodorov (b. 1959) has executed a number of commissions for English cathedrals: an icon of Saint ...


3

As long as we're talking about using icons in worship and not worshiping icons: The very earliest written account of icons in general that I'm aware of comes in Eusebius' Ecclesiastical History written in the early 4th century before and during the reign of Constantine (it is regarded as the very first history of the Christian church ever written): I do ...


3

Yes, for example, the vesica pisces is a newer invention. Sure some will argue that the fish has always been a Christian symbol, however the modern / Christian usage of the vesica pisces is not the same symbol used in the early church as seen below. vs


3

To approach this question we must first cut through terminology. The Catholic Dictionary defines worship as Acknowledgment of another's worth, dignity, or superior position. So worship is not, necessarily, religious at all. It then goes on to define two words for worship of a particularly religious character. In religion, worship is given ...


3

This seems to suggest that some images, fulfilling certain criteria, are "recognized" to be accurate representations of Jesus thanks to special information given directly by God to the artist. There are no specific criteria that I am aware of. Furthermore, I think it is correct to say that we Orthodox do not necessarily believe that the images ...


3

There are no such problem to show the violence in icons in orthodoxy. There are many icons of martyrs, which shows their suffers on. Like behading or quartering. The sample the that kind of icons are: Icon of Daniel the Prophet and the three children: and St.Sebastian of Mediolan:


3

First off, Catholics do not believe Mary is "present in the icon" in the same way we believe Jesus is present in the Eucharist in a particularly physical way (the Eucharist, or physical incarnation of Jesus on Earth, is the only actual physical thing that Catholics worship to my knowledge). Though Mary, like all the other saints (and of course our omniscient ...


3

Air kisses are totally fine. The purpose of the kiss is to show reverence to that which the icon portrays, whether it is of Christ, the Theotokos or a Saint. Depending on the ethnicity of the Church you attend, you may see people prostrate (bow fully and touch their hand to the floor), or kneel down and fully touch their head to the floor. Some do this ...


3

See the Catholic Encyclopedia: Halos were used in art among the pagans long before the Christian Era. In the monuments of Hellenic and Roman art, the heads of the gods, heroes, and other distinguished persons are often found with a disc-shaped halo, a circle of light, or a rayed-fillet. This iconography was later adopted as a sacred symbol by both Buddhism ...


2

While I cannot tell you when the practice of wearing an empty cross began, I can give you the reason that I was given for doing so. As a Southern Baptist I was taught that the empty cross symbolizes that Jesus is no longer dead, but that he took up his life again as he said he would. This is not my interpretation nor is it my feeling, I wear a crucifix ...


2

I am, in fact a Catholic. I was intrigued by your question and so I decided to do some religious research with my Catechism books. So according to the books: The first commandment forbids the making or the use of statures and pictures only when they promote false worship. An example of this would be using a medal, not to remind us of a saint (Such as St. ...


1

This obviously is a big topic, so here are just a few quick notes. That there is a distinction between worship and veneration Luke 1:48: for he has looked on the humble estate of his servant. For behold, from now on all generations will call me blessed; According to the bible, all generations (that is, including ours) should call Mary blessed. ...


1

From catholic perspective, an icon is a symbol, nothing more. you do not pray to it, but ask for the intersession (of the depicted individual perhaps) for you. @Andremoniy, I think there is already a lot of good summaries of this on the web, you can probably compile a smaller summary, and ask people to verify if it seems accurate to them.


1

Quite early in Christian history the cross (without a human form on it) became a symbol of Christianity and appears to have become a superstitious symbol as well. Heathens recognized this seeming superstitious behavior, so that by the time of Tertullian heathen called Christians cross-worshippers. You are correct though, from what I can tell. It was not ...



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