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1

It was not proscribed in the Act of Supremacy, which occurred in 1534 (see that info further below). It looks like the rights to confession were first included in the "39 Articles of Religion," a small book with revisions throughout the years. Several sources confirm that these articles were drawn up in 1563 but I managed to find "An Essay on the 39 Articles ...


2

The Holy Sacrifice of the Mass: Dogmatically, Liturgically and Ascetically Explained (1902) by Fr. Nikolaus Gihr writes in the first footnote of §32, "The Language Used in the Celebration of the Holy Mass" (p. 319-328): Whether the Apostles celebrated the Holy Sacrifice in the language of each individual nation or only in the Aramean (Syro-Chaldaic), ...


-1

The answers here might be linguistically correct, but the real reason is because the Church wanted all ties with Judaism to be severed . Just like Jesus's name is not Jesus, but Yeshua , and more specifically, RABBI Yeshua.


1

Try Reading The Epistle of Paul to the Romans The bible 'book' (it was originally a letter) called 'Romans' is a systematic explanation of the 'gospel' (good news message) of Jesus Christ. It's a great place to start when trying to understand concepts such as 'salvation' 'sin' 'universal guilt' etc. Some key premises of Christianity can help in ...


8

The names of the authors of the Gospels have been adapted into English from the Greek of the New Testament.1 However, Hebrew and/or Aramaic were likely the mother tongue(s) of three of the evangelists (Matthew, Mark, and John), and their names reflect this background. Luke's name is Greek. All of these are normal, common names, and there is no reason to ...


2

Religion raises a lot of emotions and is hard to deal with objectively. As a result, there is very little material that does not 'preach' - either to bring you into the fold or to show you how wrong Christianity really is. You appear to be interested in learning the Bible stories, rather than understanding the theology that ties these stories together, so ...


4

A very readable overview of Christian history may be found in Church History in Plain Language by Bruce Shelley. A deeper dive into more recent history is Eerdman's Handbook to Christianity in America. For a good overview of the common beliefs shared by a majority of Christian groups, try Mere Christianity by C.S. Lewis. For a somewhat polemical take on ...


-4

We read regarding the building of Solomon's Temple (i.e. the 1st Temple) that "the stone was made ready before it was brought thither" so I think the sames rules applied when building Herod's Temple (i.e. the 2nd Temple) which would mean that all the materials had to be prepared a distance away from the holy place and then transported to the construction ...


-1

From the opening of Ignatius' Letter to the Smyrneans: I glorify Jesus Christ, the God who made you so wise, for I observed that you are established in an unshakable faith, having been nailed, as it were, to the cross of the Lord Jesus Christ in both body and spirit and firmly established in love by the blood of Christ totally convinced with regard to ...


5

Joseph B. Tyson (Marcion and Luke-Acts, page 24) says that almost everything we know about Marcion comes from polemics written by heresiologists in the second to fourth centuries, particularly Irenaeus. Neither Marcion nor Justin Martyr has left any extant writings that could connect the two in any meaningful way. Irenaeus (Against Heresies, iv.6) mentions ...


16

This question is complicated, of course, by the fact that we must work with translations of the original texts in order to find this wording. However, at least three second-century authors use this phrasing when translated into English: Justin Martyr, Athenagoras of Athens, and Clement of Alexandria. Justin Martyr (100–165) writes, in Dialogue with ...



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