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The dream of which we read in 1 Nephi 8 is somewhat reminiscent of the Tree of Knowledge story in Genesis 3, except that instead of a snake, there is a man in a white robe, and no harm comes to those who eat the fruit. The parallels seem close enough to suggest a literary dependency. In Genesis 3:22-24, we read that the Tree of Life bestows immortality, so ...


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Yes, the Tree of Life is actually a common motif for seemingly many cultures -- not just the Near East. Its symbol and presence in mythology transcends geographical boundaries. Just conducting a basic google search, Wikipedia cites all the many cultures that have portrayed a "Tree of Life" in their mythical/philosophical traditions: Tree of life (Wikipedia)....


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Job 34:14 *If it were his (God's) intention and he withdrew his spirit and breath, 15 all humanity would perish together and mankind would return to the dust.* Read the chapter in context. Elihu presents a magnificent superlative of the superiority of God... It is He who invests the 'dust' of creation with aptitude and passion and beauty and free will...life ...


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It would seem that is the earliest known Biblical reference to ashes being in Genesis, when Abraham accepts that he is nothing but dust and ashes before the LORD, so it is a symbol of humility before God. Then Abraham answered and said, “Indeed now, I who am but dust and ashes have taken it upon myself to speak to the Lord..." Genesis 18:27 ...


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According to the Jerusalem Talmud, Lamech (the fifth descendant of Cain) took one wife for sensual pleasure and the second for procreation. Jewish sources say that Lamech concocted an herbal drug that he regularly administered to one of his wives to prevent her from getting pregnant. This is a stark departure from the biblical ideal for marriage. Since these ...


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Lamech is the first male in the Bible text to take two wives. Without naming them some yahoo could have come along and said he took the same female twice as a wife or some other equally silly thing. So naming them removes any doubt they were two seperate females. In addition to this question possibly you should be asking whose daughters Adah and Zillah ...


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John Romer says, in Testament: The Bible and History, page 129, under the Syrian kings, the position of High Priest was on sale to the highest bidder. The High Priest was the virtual ruler, under the Syrian king, of all Judah. It appears here that Jason had bought the position of High Priest and "received from Antiochus permission to convert Jerusalem into ...


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There could not have been any writings refuting the gospels because these were not written until, at least 50 to 90 AD. And there would have been very little circulation due to two main reasons: they were manuscripts (books wouldn't appear until the 15th century) and 95 to 98% of people were illiterate at the time. Also Christianism was not considered an ...


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If you'll believe it, there's a fair bit of evidence that the 'original Greek' that most think the new Testament originally written in is actually a translation from the original Aramaic transcripts. From the only complete Aramaic-English translation, passages such as those that talk of a "camel" going through an eye of a needle can be more correctly ...


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A correct interpretation of Luke 2:2 requires taking into account a key item of historical information of a most practical nature: any census of subjects (as opposed to citizens) of the Roman Empire was carried out for tax purposes, to determine the taxable base of each subject. In such a census, people to be registered were not expected to travel but to do ...


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The resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead is central to the Christian message. Without it, Christianity would be just another religion. What makes the case so compelling for belief? Here are several ideas to consider. God knew how hard it would be for us to believe someone could rise from the dead, so he told us throughout the Old Testament that he ...


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1Peter1:1-5, John 3:16-18, John 6:35-40, Romans 8:35-39 Baptist believe that once saved always saved,/Roman 3:21-28,1Peter1:18-21,John 14:6 baptist believe that salvation is a work that only Christ could have done for our salvation Ephesians 2:8-9 we have no part in it as far as the salvation supplied to go to heaven, it's a free gift from God. Mt.3:6,16 ( ...


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The estimation of the year of Jesus' birth depends on the estimation of the year of Herod's death. The information to date the latter event is provided by Flavius Josephus in his Antiquities of the Jews, book 17 [1]. In 17.6.4, when narrating events leading to Herod's last times, he notes an event involving the high priest Matthias ben Theophilus: Now ...


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A correct interpretation of Luke 2:2 requires taking into account a key item of historical information of a most practical nature: any census of subjects (as opposed to citizens) of the Roman Empire was carried out for tax purposes, to determine the taxable base of each subject. In such a census, people to be registered were not expected to travel but to do ...



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