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11

There was no mandate that the gospels should appear in the order they were written once they were gathered into a collection. This is true of the rest of the New Testament as well. The order is the gospel accounts, the history of the early church, the letters of Paul to churches, to people, letters by other apostles, and prophecy. So, there ...


10

"Christ" is from the Greek "christos," which means anointed - it's the same as the Hebrew Messiah. "Christ" as such is solely a title, though it has come to be both a title and a name; you can see it rather clearly in some of Paul's writings. Jesus is not just a christ but is the Christ. It identifies Him, and is therefore a name.


8

I don't know for sure who the Pope meant, since he did not give very many clues, but I think he was referring to Antonio Rosmini-Serbati (1797-1855). His writings criticising the church were placed on the Index during his lifetime, but he was beatified by Pope Benedict XVI in 2007. The biography fits the way that Pope Francis describes events, with the ...


8

No, the Bible does not. This is the last mention of the ark in the Old Testament: 2 Chronicles 35:3 And said unto the Levites that taught all Israel, which were holy unto the LORD, Put the holy ark in the house which Solomon the son of David king of Israel did build; it shall not be a burden upon your shoulders: serve now the LORD your God, and ...


6

The word "Christ" is derived from the Greek translation of the Hebrew word (that is commonly rendered as) "Messiah"; it means "anointed". So "Jesus Christ" means "Jesus the Messiah" or "Jesus the anointed One". The phrase "Christ the Lord" could be understood as "The anointed One, the Lord" but I suspect it's actually a case of people using "Christ" as a ...


3

In Catholicism, the marks of the Church are that she is one holy catholic apostolic these words are taken from the second part of the Nicene creed, which is commonly prayed at every Mass and the tenents of which are generally accepted by mainline Protestant denominations. I think, but have very little basis for this thought, that Protestant reformers ...


3

As some existing answers and comments already note, the boundary between a "name" and a "title" can be murky or fluid. Another possibility has recently been argued at length by Matthew Novenson in his book, Christ among the Messiahs: Christ Language in Paul and Messiah Language in Ancient Judaism (OUP, 2012). He spends 30+ pages on the question, attempting ...


2

The halo originated from the Pre-Islmaic Iranian faith of Zoroastrianism. They believed in the Idea of Farr, or "Divine Favor". this 'favor' was represented by a ring called the Hvrena which was given to the king by their gods, but if the king displeased the gods, it was taken away. This ring was guarded by the god Mithras, who was the god of Daylight. It ...


2

I'm not sure what you mean by "God's heritage," but I'll make an educated guess below. First, let me address the question: are we all the children of God? Based on Matthew 5:9, only the peacemakers are called the children of God. In Mark 10:24, Jesus refers to the disciples as "children." Romans 8-9 and 1 John further supports the notion that "children of ...


2

This appears to be a Jewish tradition rather than any precept of God, since the only Biblical reference I can find is in Paul's letter to Timothy: 1st Timothy 2:11 through 15 KJV Let the woman learn in silence with all subjection. But I suffer not a woman to teach, nor to usurp authority over the man, but to be in silence. For Adam was first formed, ...


1

The Straight Dope UltraJoe makes a good point. Not all of "God's children" are really God's children. Yes, we are all children of God by creation; we are not all, however, children of God by redemption. The apostle John makes this crystal clear: "[Jesus] came unto His own people, but they did not receive Him. But to as many who did receive Him, He gave ...


1

Mainly for historical interest, I point out Optatus, a bishop of Milevis in modern-day Algeria. In a work published some time around A.D.370, he wrote at length in opposition to Parmenianus, the bishop of Carthage and leader of the Donatist movement. Parmenianus claimed that there were six distinctive gifts of the true Church, and that Donatism possessed ...


1

Quite a few of the things Jesus and his disciples had to address they had diagnosed as "demons". Today we call things of similar symptoms "disorders". In order to answer your question, we have to clarify a couple of things. The Bible clearly distinguished between Possession by Devils, (Demons in some translations), and diseases, and sickness. Possession ...


1

I don't claim to know why our Bibles include the Gospels in the order that they do. I'll be interested if somebody else on here has a definitive answer to that question. But why do you suppose they should be included by the order in which they were written? I don't organize the books on my bookshelves by their copyright dates: I group them in ways that seem ...


1

The ark constructed was a copy of the original in heaven. Exodus 25;9 According to all that I shew thee, after the pattern of the tabernacle and the pattern of all the instruments thereof, even so shall ye make it. The whereabouts of the copy remains unknown. Revelation 11;19 And the temple of God was opened in heaven, and there was seen in his temple ...


1

I think you'll find the story in the Kebra Negast, rather than the Bible. See Littman, Dr E, The Legend of the Queen of Sheba in the Tradition of Axum, Book 1 of Biliotheca Abessinica: Studies Concerning the Languages, Literature and History of Abyssinia, Princeton, Leyden and The University Library: E J Brill, 1904, p 11. As the story goes, King Solomon ...


1

The Greek work kleptes refers to a common thief; but in Matthew and Mark's account of the thieves crucified, the Greek word lestes is used, which has the root meaning "to plunder." Though we don't have information on the nature of their crimes, the use of this term indicates they were probably a part of a rebel group.


1

When Jesus was on earth, Palestine had become, to a considerable extent, a polyglot, or multilingual, region. There is solid evidence that the Jews still retained their use of Hebrew, but Aramaic and Koine were also spoken. Latin, too, appeared on official inscriptions of the Roman rulers of the land (Joh 19:20) and was doubtless heard from Roman soldiers ...



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