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7

Philo The first-century Jewish theologian Philo may not have been the first Jew to reject the literal historicity of the creation stories, as it is my understanding that educated Alexandrian Jews had long understood the creation accounts to be allegories. According to Jean-Louis Ska (The Book of Genesis, page 20), Philo (prior to Josephus and the Talmud) ...


5

The answer is a definite "no." According to the Torah, only males descended from Aharon (i.e., בְּנֵי אַהֲרֹן) were permitted to be priests (כֹּהֲנִים). In Exo. 40:13-15, it is written, 13 And you shall clothe Aharon with the holy garments, and anoint him, and sanctify him, so that he may be a priest for Me. 14 And you shall bring his sons and clothe ...


2

I really don't think so. Although I am not an expert, I took a class about the New Testament last summer (it was academic and spiritual) and in the class my professor taught that there was an outer court called the "court of women", then there was the "inner court" where women weren't allowed, and then there was the temple inside the inner court. Mind you, ...


2

There are inscriptions found in Kuntillet Ajtud and a further inscription found scratched on bedrock in a tomb at Khirbet el-Qom in Judah, that appear to say the goddess Asherah was considered to be the wife of Yahweh. The first of these was discovered in 1975, when Tel Aviv University archaeologist Ze’ev Meshel decided to excavate at remote Kuntillet ‘Ajrud ...


2

The Bible used today by Christians was dived into chapter and verse by Catholic Arch Bishop Stephen Langton. Prior to this, Jewish Rabbi,s had devided the OT, the OT used in their calendar, so that is could be used is worship through the year. This was their Catechism and their Liturgy.


2

The short answer is: none known to date. A variety of speculation has arisen on the relationship between how Herod conducted himself and the impact that had on the narrations related to him in scripture. At the lowest level of detail: the Wikipedia article cites a decent range of sources and still concludes there are no contemporary sources that match one ...


1

Were there female priests in the temple in Jerusalem at any time? Definitely, Yes! Certainly the ‘priestly code’ of early Judaism assigned the duties associated with the korbanot (‘sacrifical offerings’) only to the kohanim (‘priests’) who were specifically sons of Aaron (Ex.40:13-15). The priestly function also included other temple responsibilities, ...



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