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20

You're reading way too much into this :) In order to appreciate this song, I think you need to allow for variation of meaning in the English language. Understanding some songs even require that we grant them some poetic license, although I think we should treat those with caution because consciously or otherwise those do tend to cloud our theology. However ...


12

I think the issue here is that you are trying to examine one point of doctrine outside of the context of the whole system of doctrines that it fits into. If you take the Calvinistic doctrine of predestination by itself and tack it on to a generic pseudo-protestant view of salvation, you'll end up with a problem such as the one you describe. God becomes ...


11

I think here the meaning of "indebted" is simply in the sense that you are thankful, not in the sense that you'll have a bill come later.


10

Essentially it boils down to that we are saved by grace alone, but that salvation results in such a change of heart that good works must result. From the Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Salvation (all emphasis mine): 27.The Catholic understanding also sees faith as fundamental in justification. For without faith, no justification can take place. ...


7

"O to grace, how great a debtor, daily I'm constrained to be." Is essentially the poetic way of saying: Every day I'm made to realize how much I owe everything to grace. It doesn't need to mean a literal being in debt - it just happens that the language of debt is used to express such ideas. We might also put it: Every day I'm made to realize ...


7

As with many things in scripture, the first thing to do is zoom out and grab some context. For freedom Christ has set us free; stand firm therefore, and do not submit again to a yoke of slavery. Look: I, Paul, say to you that if you accept circumcision, Christ will be of no advantage to you. I testify again to every man who accepts circumcision that he ...


6

For most Catholic questions there are two places to start: Summa Theologica, by Thomas Aquinas Catechism of the Catholic Church So for this question I will use this from the CCC (#2) http://www.vatican.va/archive/ccc_css/archive/catechism/p3s1c3a2.htm And from Summa Theologica this: http://www.newadvent.org/summa/2111.htm So there are two types of ...


6

This isn't truly an "answer" to the question so to speak, so please excuse my butting in here. I think it may be helpful, however, for future readers, to do a small deconstruction of this argument from the perspective of a sola fide belief system. I'm still interested in the other perspectives as well. While logically, the gambit seems to make sense, it ...


6

This is a Latter-Day Saint perspective. From the Book of Mormon 2 Nephi 25:23 For we labor diligently to write, to persuade our children, and also our brethren, to believe in Christ, and to be reconciled to God; for we know that it is by grace that we are saved, after all we can do. Nephi is an accepted ancient prophet in the LDS religion. The whole ...


6

James is writing his epistle to "my brethren" (1:2), who are already of the church, so he is not writing to unbelievers to tell them how to be saved from their sins an get right with God. His readers have already come to Jesus and had their sins washed away in the blood of the Lamb, been justified by faith, and entered into a saving relationship with God. ...


6

I'll start with the "state of Christian grace" bit. The common teaching (and probably not limited to Catholics) is that people who die not in a state of grace do not go to heaven. BUT, the church also teaches that we don't know who is in a state of Christian grace, or not. One of the teachings of the Roman Catholic church is that once a person has been ...


5

Here's the Arminian perspective: Background First, a little background. Jacobus Arminius was a Reformed theologian who eventually became convinced that Calvin's views of predestination and unconditional election made God the author of evil. His reasoning was that if God controls all our choices and does not give us free will, then even our wrong choices ...


5

Romans 7:7 states, What shall we say, then? Is the law sin? Certainly not! Indeed I would not have known what sin was except through the law. For I would not have known what coveting really was if the law had not said, "Do not covet." Therefore, as Wesley defined Sin is a willful transgression of a known law of God. Without known laws of ...


5

From a Lutheran perspective: We do not believe in us having to do anything. Even accepting Christ. Ephesians 1:4 4 For he chose us in him before the creation of the world to be holy and blameless in his sight. He chose us. Not the other way around. If we don't accept Christ, how do we know that we're saved? Baptism. 1 Peter 3:21 21 Baptism ...


5

Having read both of these authors, I can confidently say that Bell and Tullian are significantly different in their approaches to scripture, and in their interpretations thereof. I align myself strongly with Tullian's approach, but disagree strongly with Bell's belief. Historically speaking, Bell's theology aligns well with historical Universalism, or ...


5

If you (say you) have faith but don't have works, do you really have faith? Works are the result of faith. They don't save you. If you have faith, it is only natural that you will have works. James's question is to people who have no works. Why don't you have any works? Where is your faith? Matthew 12:33 (NASB) "Make a tree good and its fruit will be ...


5

Baptism leaves an indelible mark on the soul, but heresy separates one from the Church. Canon 2314, 1917 Code of Canon Law: “All apostates from the Christian faith and each and every heretic or schismatic: 1) Incur ipso facto excommunication Pope Leo XIII, Satis Cognitum (# 9), June 29, 1896:  “… can it be lawful for anyone to reject any one ...


4

We ask "is it okay to _" because many Christians were raised on moral religiosity instead of principles of Christian decision making. Based on the second greatest commandment to love our neighbors as ourselves (Matthew 22:39), Jesus calls everyone to love every human being they come into contact with (including themselves). And to love means to seek what ...


4

I believe that the demographic for your gambit would object on a couple of grounds. Firstly, they would object to sacrificing integrity in choosing to believe something that one does not actually believe. Secondly, they would object to your premise: If you are saved by grace, you should want to serve God as heartily and fully as possible, loving him ...


4

As it's been preached to me, justice, here, refers to God's faithfulness to His own promises. It does not refer to giving us what we deserve, which would be Hell. Toward us, justice would necessarily mean Hell. Instead, "Just" refers to the fact that He has promised to forgive us through the cleansing power of Christ's blood, as long as we have repented ...


4

Another term is "Gospel Reductionism". Therefore, there is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. Romans 8:1 For I resolved to know nothing while I was with you except Jesus Christ and him crucified. 1 Cor 2:2 Whoever believes and is baptized will be saved, but whoever does not believe will be condemned. Mark 16:16 There are ...


4

The doctrine of Prevenient Grace is seen by those who adhere to it as a natural outcome of sound Biblical exegesis. In one respect it's akin to the doctrine of the Trinity in that it resolves apparent discrepancies. With the Trinity, we have clear teachings in Scripture that there is only one God, other clear teachings that Jesus is God, and others ...


3

There's a simpler answer than all of the others: In Sum, why not believe in salvation by grace? Because you don't just choose what you believe. You believe things because you think they're true. So, even if this argument was valid, it wouldn't be useful, because it recommends a choice that you don't control. The same applies to Pascal's Wager.


3

Itis saying the same as Paul "2Co_5:14 For the love of Christ constraineth us; because we thus judge, that if one died for all, then were all dead:" Doesn't His love set us free? YES! But being so great and good it constrains us!


3

Hah, when I first heard about this theory, I thought it made sense. but to God, it does not. You may have heard about the story of two sinners who were hanged left and right of Jesus, where one sinner did not repent, however the other one did, and became the first one to enter the paradise with Jesus. IMO, I think the creater of this Gambit heard about this. ...


3

The act of believing in salvation by grace is itself a work. I cannot accept the wager; grace must be accepted via a work, 'working together with faith', as St. James puts it. Secondly, this makes a weird dichotomy that I'm not sure how to parse. Who are the people who believe in Salvation by Works? Do you mean Roman Catholics? I'm pretty sure they ...


3

I should preface this answer by pointing out that Catholics and non-Catholic Christians may not mean the same thing at all when they each say the word "faith". When a Catholic says "faith" in a context like this, he means free assent to the whole truth that God has revealed (CCC 150). This is not a complete definition of faith but it's an essential part. I'm ...


3

You might want to have the New American Bible sourced, that's our defacto bible, although it's not always as flowery and scholars don't really use it, it contains what we believe. It could give you a concise answer without me elaborating. But now the righteousness of God has been manifested apart from the law, though testified to by the law and the ...


3

The question you are asking here is really the essence and the magnificence of the Gospel itself. The scripture that we're all familiar with John 3:16-17 16 “For God loved the world so much that he gave his one and only Son, so that everyone who believes in him will not perish but have eternal life. 17 God sent his Son into the world not to ...


3

I recommend you read Zane Hodges' book "The Gospel Under Siege" for a full answer to this question, as he deals with 1 John. I am fully convinced that 1 John is a letter to believers and is a test of fellowship, not a test of life. When it says in the original greek that they are "not of God" it is referring to their fellowship with God, not whether they are ...



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