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12

I tend to agree with Marc Gravell's answer on this, but I would like to add that I don't think that any religious influence or moral framework could make a true democracy work. True democracy, history has shown, always degenerates into what Lord Acton described as "the tyranny of the majority" in which the rights of the minority get trampled by the opinion ...


11

While many Christians are against the death penalty, there is also biblical sanction for it. Genesis 9:6 commands the killing of those who commit murder- He who sheds a man's blood, by man shall shall his blood be shed. For many fundamentalists, such a clear case for the death penalty means that the death penalty should thus be supported. The key ...


9

Christianity does not hold a "church and state must be separate" view at all; that might be part of the US constitution, but : not universal - and to all intents and purposes it is not even correct in the US, since it is quietly acknowledged that you don't stand much chance of election if you are openly non-Christian (regardless of your actual views). ...


8

The Church of Scotland is not a state church. It is recognised as "national church", but it is independent of the state in matters spiritual. The Church of Scotland and the Church of England have very different histories - it is not a question of one trying to imitate the other. The Scottish Reformation of 1560 took place when Scotland was still a separate ...


8

No, there is no Biblical imperative for us to participate in government in the way you describe. The New Testament doesn't say much about our relationship with government, because the emphasis is on our membership in Christ. We are to be less concerned with things of the world, and more concerned with the things of God. Here's what the Bible does say ...


7

I suppose it is emphatic “no”. This is because we cannot bring moral equivalency between abortion and the death penalty. Both these issues are circumstantially different to each other. One is about an innocent baby’s life being taken in the womb and other a convicted murderer being executed. A baby in the womb has committed no crime. It is inhuman not to ...


6

There are a few problems with this approach; firstly, democracy cannot make sense if there is something with a super-vote; if we ignore the Christian hot-points, and say that (silly example) there's a religious law that says "chairs must be blue". At this point, it doesn't matter if 95%+ of the population wants to use different colour chairs - they are ...


6

Jethro very plainly is advocating subsidiarity for Moses. I don't see any reference to distributism in that chapter though. Jethro is addressing organization/governance, not economics/ownership. (However, both terms are relatively new to me so I could be misunderstanding.) There are several New Testament passages that assume subsidiarity without ...


5

I like Eric's answer, but I'm going to give a contrarian answer. In Philippians 4: 8,9, we read: Finally, beloved, whatever is true, whatever is honourable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is pleasing, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence and if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things. Keep on doing the ...


5

God not only allows for the death penalty, but specifically prescribes it--and it is not because life is not sacred, but because it is. “Whoever sheds the blood of man, by man shall his blood be shed, for God made man in his own image. Genesis 9:6 ESV Specifically, if someone murders another, his crime is so heinous that God declares he has ...


5

Since Peter answered your first question, I'll attempt to answer your second question. And, once we've established who conflated the two, what was the biblical rationale for doing so? Jesus spoke of doing good to others. Matthew 25:35-40 - ...for I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger ...


4

For Evangelicals*, the seminal work on this very question is Kingdoms In Conflict by Chuck Colson. (Note, the book has been since released for those unable to handle anything less than a summary in its title, as God and Government: An Insider's View on the Boundaries between Faith and Politics.) Chuck Colson - special assistant to President Nixon during ...


3

As a fellow Screwtape letters reader, you'd know what C.S. Lewis says about using Jesus to support this or that economic theory; and that it's not a good thing. But, that doesn't mean that the Church herself should be absent from the discussion of economic theories, as one of the important, but not critical, functions of Christian Churches is to provide ...


3

Jehovah's Witnesses believe that bowing down to a flag, saluting it or pledging allegiance to it, is equivalent to worshiping the flag, the nation it represents, or even the nation's leaders. Our sole devotion and allegiance should be to God. A scriptural account that provides a principle to follow is found in Daniel chapter 3. Also, the scriptures show ...


3

"Submit" in this passage doesn't mean "behave as a doormat" or "never speak critically of". It means don't rebel. If your "human authority" allows you to take an active part in public discourse, to campaign, to try to influence your fellow voters (which democracies of course do, for people of all faiths or none) this passage doesn't prevent people doing it. ...


3

Q. Why do Jehovah's Witnesses refuse to pledge allegiance or salute the flag? A. The answer is found in the very definition of what the words "pledge" and "allegiance" mean and on what God's word the Bible states / shows to Whom we are to pledge our allegiance. "pledge noun \ˈplej\ : a serious promise or agreement : a promise to give money : ...


3

The separation of church and state is a "Baptist Distinctive" but is not commonly held across the remainder of the Christian spectrum. To wit: The state church of England is the Church of England (Anglican). The state church of Scotland is the Church of Scotland (Presbyterian) Most Orthodox denominations (Russian, Armenian, Ethopian) have specific ...


3

There are in fact different concepts that emerged in christianity during the ages. Early christians that lived under pagan emperors were taught by Saint Paul to respect civil authorities and pray for them so they come to truth. When the persecutions ended and emperors accepted christianity, there was a temptation to accept millenarist view that Rome ...


3

When Pilate asked Jesus about the accusations made against him, that he was calling himself the King of the Jews (and thus implicitly threatening Roman rule), Jesus told him that "My kingdom is not of this world." (John 18:36) Also, consider one of the rhetorical traps the Pharisees laid for him: Matthew 22: 15-21 15 Then went the Pharisees, and ...


3

I don't know of anything in the Bible that explicitly commands participation in government. While the idea of voting was known at the time -- Rome and parts of Greece were republics during periods that overlapped the Old Testament -- I don't know of any mention of it in the Bible. On the other hand, the Bible does repeatedly command us to help orphans and ...


3

The term "democracy" comes from ancient Greece, where what is generally considered the first democracy was established in Athens in 507 BCE. Democracy thus predates Christianity by a significant margin. As for "Christian values" having an influence on the success of democracies, note that many of these democracies, especially in Europe, were created by ...


3

Read Rodney Stark's The Victory of Reason. His entire book is an argument that says the answer is yes. From respect for humanity's images dei to an understanding of property rights being grounded by a common transcendent God, he makes the argument you're looking for.


2

Creator and Lord I suppose the Biblical basis for Theonomy begins with the fact that God created everything and everyone, and is therefore Lord of all creation. "In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth." (Genesis 1:1, NASB) "Worthy are You, our Lord and our God, to receive glory and honor and power; for You created all things, and ...


2

Christianity, or at least Catholicism, teaches us to honor and respect our traditions. It is a corporal work of mercy to bury the dead and a spiritual work to pray for them and tradition, as G.K. Chesterton wrote in Orthodoxy is the "Democracy of the Dead". Tobit was ruined because he persevered in burying the dead. Tradition means giving votes to the ...


1

I believe this ending conclusion and summary - Thus, even if public authority commanded that every religious institution perform same-sex marriages, if the Church believed that such a command contravened the will of God, it would refuse to do so. - in MattGutting's answer to Homosexual marriages in the Catholic church sums it up well. The Lord Jesus himself ...


1

I learned this from Jehovah's Witnesses. They believe that Satan is the ruler of this world: John 12:31 (NIV) Now is the time for judgment on this world; now the prince of this world will be driven out. John 14:30 (NIV) I will not say much more to you, for the prince of this world is coming. He has no hold over me. They also believe that each ...


1

Absolutely; for if we don't we become complicit in the results and we can claim no authority to object to the actions of that government's rulers. Sure we can say there's a higher calling and it's heaven but to not participate, even so little as not voting is a poor witness at best; we in essence are throwing our support to the victor whether they're good or ...


1

Simply stated, theonomy is God's law or the rule of God (Deut.27:26). Israel is the only nation ever to live under the theonomy of the living God. It is to be compared with autonomy - self rule, and heteronomy - rule by another. Concerning the Church of Jesus Christ, theonomy is an ethical mandate. It is not a political rule as such but rather the basis of ...


1

Does Christianity teach the values for democracy to work? The idea of democracy was first posited as a way to assure that the rights of wealthy slave owners would be least impinged by each other in Greece. The freedom of democracy comes at a price. It requires a great deal of self-restraint. Japan is probably the only culture (maybe Germany as well) ...



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