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13

The answer to this question depends somewhat on the definition of "quoted," but we can draw some high-level conclusions. BlueLetterBible.org provides a list of New Testament citations and allusions to the Old Testament, and an examination of that dataset reveals the following: Book Direct/indirect citations Total citations & allusions ...


13

Logically, there are two possibilities: either Jesus himself said such things or they were added to the tradition at a later date. Neither view offers a clear-cut explanation, so a wide variety of ideas for the "secretive" passages have been offered by Christian commentators and Bible scholars over the years. Jesus did not tell anyone to remain quiet ...


11

This is part two of a two part answer. See my previous post for general arguments. Specific books Matthew External - On Matthew Papias writes, "Matthew collected the oracles in the Hebrew language, and each interpreted them as best he could.". This is probably the most debated phrase in all of the patristic writings - the words translated as "oracles", ...


10

This is part one of a two part post The assertion in a comment on the question that no scholar "believes that the books were authored by the names on the books" is just plain false. The only way one can even come close to this conclusion is by dismissing all scholarship from conservatives out of hand as "not objective", a severe version of the genetic ...


8

The most commonsensical explanation of the Messianic Secret is simple self preservation - not necessarily self preservation in the literal sense, but in terms of the mission of Jesus. He couldn't do what he was trying to do if it became well known that he was the messiah. In the time in which Jesus lived, Palestine was under Roman occupation. Jesus was ...


7

It's because the church fathers thought Matthew was written first. Augustine writes: Now, those four evangelists whose names have gained the most remarkable circulation over the whole world [...] are believed to have written in the order which follows: first Matthew, then Mark, thirdly Luke, lastly John. (Harmony of the Gospels, 1.2) Eusebius reports ...


6

In Ancient Judaism, preserving and accurately copying the scriptures was a task considered to be of the utmost importance. As such, an official Temple position dedicated to this task was created. Such a scribal position was not unique to Judaism; indeed, many ancient societies had trained professionals whose primary job was to maintain and copy religious ...


5

John's account of Pilate's questioning of Jesus is more detailed: in Matthew it's given only four verses, 27:11-14, but in John it's given nine verses, 18:33-38, 19:9-11. In both gospels Jesus responds to Pilate's question of whether Jesus is the king of the Jews: Matthew 27:11 and John 18:34-37. And in both gospels Jesus is later silent when Pilate ...


5

The authorship of the New Testament is a not universally agreed among Biblical scholars. Many would not agree that Matthew, Mark, Luke or John actually wrote the gospels that bear their name. However I'll assume you want a fairly traditional approach if you are teaching youth. There is one thing that is almost universally agreed among scholars and that is ...


5

With respect to the traditional attributions, here's the simple list: Matthew: None Mark: None Luke: Acts John: 1 John, 2 John, 3 John, and Revelation Modern scholarship, which typically rejects the traditionally attributed authors of these books, still generally attributes Luke and Acts to the same author. There is less agreement on the authorship of ...


4

None of the four Gospels record Jesus performing a miracle prior to his temptation in the wilderness. Matthew, Mark, and Luke all record Jesus' baptism and immediately follow it with his temptation in the wilderness. John does not mention the temptation: after Jesus' baptism, Jesus begins calling his disciples. That said, we can't provide a definitive ...


4

The Messianic Secret refers to a motif primarily in the Gospel of Mark in which Jesus is portrayed as commanding his followers to silence about his Messianic mission. The Messianic Secret belongs in Mark's Gospel, but elements of it have been copied into the later synoptic gospels (Matthew and Luke) but not into John, which takes a very contrary view of ...


4

One of my favorite go-to books on this kind of topic is St. Augustine's De Consensu Evangelistarum, which includes a chapter on the calling of the apostles. The full chapter is worth a read, but here is my breakdown of it as it applies to this specific question. Statement of the Difficulty 37 The question may indeed be raised as to how John gives us ...


3

Published commentaries, with insights The stories of Jonah and Jesus in boats are quite similar, so the question becomes one of whether the story of Jonah in some way prefigures that of Jesus or whether the story of Jesus calming the storm was substantially based on the story of Jonah. Many commentaries that find prefigurement in the Book of Jonah really ...


3

I'm not sure that there is a contradiction. Using the NIV translation: They said to him, “That would take more than half a year’s wages [200 denarii]! Are we to go and spend that much on bread and give it to them to eat?” — Mark 6:37 Philip answered him, “It would take more than half a year’s wages [200 denarii] to buy enough bread for each one to ...


3

The various "New Church" denominations that follow the teachings and Bible interpretations written by Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772) give much greater weight to the Gospels (and the book of Revelation) than to the Acts and the Epistles. As explained in my answer to the question, "What writings are held as 'biblical canon' by Swedenborgians?," in the New ...


3

Even conservative and Evangelical scholars will admit that all four Gospels are indeed anonymous. In order not to be anonymous each Gospel would have to begin much as the Apostle Paul's letters began--except, of course, with the name of Matthew, Mark, Luke, or John included in the opening sentences. For example, here is how Paul's letter to the Christians in ...


3

One of the reasons is plainly given in scripture in the context to an occurrence of keeping the messianic secret Mar 1:43-45 (NIV) Jesus sent him away at once with a strong warning: “See that you don’t tell this to anyone. But go, show yourself to the priest and offer the sacrifices that Moses commanded for your cleansing, as a testimony to them.” ...


3

Your question has to be answered in three parts and must be answered with a sober yes; but the yes can be only permitted in or by a case of grave necessity. The ordinary ministers of the Eucharist are the bishop and the priests of the diocese or religious house. The ordinary ministers of proclaiming the gospel are the bishop, the priest and the deacon. As ...


2

He was just using it as an expression to make it known that whatever he was about to say needs to be taken as seriously as possible. Jesus has always told the truth but I cannot say if everything he said was taken seriously by the people he was speaking to. So it could have been used more in the context of "listen carefully to what I am about to tell you now"...


2

From the Catechism of the Catholic Church, there's a pretty clear statement that the Gospels hold the highest place. CCC 125 The Gospels are the heart of all the Scriptures "because they are our principal source for the life and teaching of the Incarnate Word, our Saviour". CCC 127 The fourfold Gospel holds a unique place in the Church, as is ...


1

According to the Bible, there was a tax collector named Matthew (also called Levi) son of Alphaeus. James son of Alphaeus is most likely Matthew's brother. As said in the comments, there were many people by the names of Jude and of James. Jude could have been anybody; and if Jude is the son of James, his dad was not a disciple nor a brother of Jesus. Most ...


1

Wikipedia gives a brief overview of how the commandment has generally been seen as "new." It accords with what I've heard through the years: The "New Commandment", the Wycliffe Bible Commentary states, "was new in that the love was to be exercised toward others not because they belonged to the same nation, but because they belonged to Christ...and the ...


1

2 Chronicles 5:13-14. The Glory of God Fills the Temple: In unison when the trumpeters and the singers were to make themselves heard with one voice to praise and to glorify the LORD, and when they lifted up their voice accompanied by trumpets and cymbals and instruments of music, and when they praised the LORD saying,"He indeed is good for His ...


1

This point has been touched on, but I wanted to flesh it out a bit. The lack of genealogies in Mark and John is intentional. Mark portrayed Christ as a Servant, which was stated already, and as such the author intentionally left out the genealogy. John HAS a genealogy, if God can be said to have one... "In the beginning was the Word." He always was, and ...


1

There is NOT a heierchy to the trinity. This is considered a heresy known as Subordinationsim by both the Roman Catholic and Evangelical churches. This was discussed and determined to be a heresy in the 3rd century A.D. and is considered to be a type of Semi-Arianism which was denounced by the First Ecumenical Council at Nicaea. The reasoning for that is ...



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