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In addition to the reward in Mathew as having no specific time line, the reward mentioned in Mark is spiritual. Brothers, sisters, mothers, children, and even homes and fields are spiritual rewards. Seriously, how would receiving material gains such as houses and lands match up expectations of persecution? “Take heed, and beware of covetousness: for a ...


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ISAIAH 55 1-3 Come, everyone who thirsts, come to the waters; and he who has no money, come buy and eat! Come buy wine and milk without money and without price. Why do you spend your money for that which is not bread, and your labor for that which does not satisfy? Listen diligently to me, and eat what is good, and delight yourselves in rich food. ...


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No. You are preaching salvation by works when you say a person "accepts Christ" to become saved. This is why you dont understand what is meant by "buying." Christs sacrifice did not buy anything in your kind of gospel ( Co-Redemption ) because you must do something of enough value to invoke God to save. No invoking results in no salvation. Christ died for ...


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They are only available by grace, which is why Jesus asked us to purchase it from Him. The fact that it is free grace does not mean it does not require cooperation from us. If we take the parable of the man who sold all to purchase a field where he believed the treasure was, likewise we should do similarly spiritually - to forsaken our attachment to the ...


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First, it is important to realize that ancient writers almost never quoted anything in the way we do today. The normal way to "quote" was via allusion - the reader was expected to recognize the author's intent via a shared background. Even when quotes are explicit ("it is written", they are often not exact (ranging from free paraphrase to "memory error" - ...


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These things are only symbolic of heavenly riches. A man may think that he is “rich, and has become wealthy, and has need of nothing,” but these earthly riches will do him no good when he stands before God. God knows that he is in fact "wretched and miserable and poor and blind and naked." If he does not "seek first the kingdom of God" and his treasure is ...


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Calvinists interpret these passages as both pronouncements against the sinful actions of the Pharisees as well as warnings to those who might follow them. But ultimately these actions cannot circumvent God's will: they will be judged for their attempts and sinful motivations, but God's irresistible grace, when offered, always overcomes resistance. Verse 13 ...


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Below is my answer to the original question: "What are the arguments for Matthew's canonicity that don't appeal to Matthean authorship or the authority of the church?" I have leaving it as is, because it is still valid answer to that part of the question (and good information), although not all of it makes sense as a reply to the edited question. First, ...


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St Ignatius "Epistle to the Magnesians" 107 AD If then they who walked in ancient customs came to a new hope, no longer living for the Sabbath, but for the Lord's Day, on which also our life sprang up through him and his death,-though some deny him,-and by this mystery we received faith, and for this reason also we suffer, that we may be found ...


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The word ptōchos used means absolute poverty. Spiritually speaking, the poor in spirit are those who recognize their utter lack of the Spirit. This is the first step one must recognize during conversion - that he lacks and need the Holy Spirit. Thus the poor in spirit are the ones who are blessed, because, unlike the proud Pharisees, they recognize with ...


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God created POLARITY. Positive cannot exist without negative. God loved Jacob but hated Esau. God created both ends of polarity: Isaiah 45:7. He kills and gives life. The God of love is also the God of wrath. Love does not tolerate wrong. Jesus was speaking to those under the Roman and Edomite rulership who hated their enemies, all those from other ...


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The Old Testament and Hebrew linguistic background of this passage should be kept in mind. Recall: Matthew (or his source) was likely translating words that were spoken in Hebrew or Aramaic. Both Jesus and Matthew likely had a Semitic mother tongue. The Hebrew bible (both in its Hebrew and Greek forms) was frequently referenced explicitly by both, ...


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It is difficult to accept that contradictions can exist in the Bible, yet this is one of them. Raymond E. Brown says, in An Introduction to the New Testament, page 114, that Luke's account of the death of Judas in Acts 1:18-19 is scarcely reconcilable with that in Matthew 27:3-10. If they can not be reconciled then one or both accounts are not really ...


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Jesus was speaking of the object of our faith. He denied Himself, and went to the Cross. That was the whole of God's Redemption Plan: the Sacrifice for our sins. It is by identification with this Redemption Plan that we're saved: I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me: and the life which I now live in the ...


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What did Jesus mean by 'take up your cross and follow me'? Matthew 16:22-25 Then Peter took him, and began to rebuke him, saying, Be it far from thee, Lord: this shall not be unto thee. But he turned, and said unto Peter, Get thee behind me, Satan: thou art an offence unto me: for thou savourest not the things that be of God, but those that be ...


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In Mark's Gospel, the last 24 hours in the life of Jesus form a unique chiastic structure, with eight periods of just three hours each: A The celebration of the Passover Feast, which becomes the Last Supper, beginning "when it was evening" (Mark 14:17), which was 6 pm by first-century Jewish reckoning. The Passover meal typically took three hours and was ...


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With Mark, in order to see the context for this promise of Jesus, we need to go back just one verse, to Mark 10:28: Mark 10:28: Then Peter began to say unto him, Lo, we have left all, and have followed thee. By 70 CE, when Mark is now believed to have been written, its author knew that there were followers who had left their "houses, brethren, sisters, ...


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We can see that when Mark says, "take up your cross" he does so in the context of losing one's life, suggestive of the crucifixion to come: Mark 8:31: And he began to teach them, that the Son of man must suffer many things, and be rejected of the elders, and of the chief priests, and scribes, and be killed, and after three days rise again. Mark ...


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My answer is a question: In the statement 'Many are called, but few are chosen', what do 'many' and 'few' mean? The Good Shepherd (Matthew 18:12-14) leaves the 99 sheep to find the one lost sheep. To him, one lost sheep is too many. To God, "any" lost people might be many, and anything short of "all" might be few. Consider also a second observation. God ...


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Much of this response has been reproduced from my blogspot section titled “Hidden Bible Truths Revealed” - What The Bible Really Says About Life After Death. If my answer seems to be overbroad, it is the result of my tendency to anticipate pertinent related questions that might arise. As to whether there will be more people in Heaven or in Hell, the Bible ...


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Saint Leonard of Port Maurice [A.D. 1676-1751], on the fewness of the saved: “After consulting all the theologians and making a diligent study of the matter, he [Suarez] wrote, ‘The most common sentiment which is held is that, among Christians [Catholics], there are more damned souls than predestined souls.’ Add the authority of the Greek and ...


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Its not about believing most will not be saved based on opinion. Thats what Matthew 7:13 states..."Enter through the narrow gate. For wide is the gate and broad is the road that leads to destruction, and many enter through it". Why try to dispute this verse with another verse? God's word isnt going to contradict itself. Jesus came to provide a way of a ...



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