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Jesus says this to him to humiliate him (i.e., to make him humble). For example, St. Remigius commentates: This must not be so understood as though it were possible for God to cause that the rich, the covetous, the avaricious, and the proud should enter into the kingdom of heaven; but to cause him to be converted, and so enter. See the other Fathers' ...


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The most common take on that passage (and the related ones in Mark 10 and Matthew 10) is the difficulty in being a disciple (or in the case of those two, the immense difficulty and challenge of being an apostle). In the notes for the New American Bible hosted at the Vatican's web site, there is a cross reference to Matthew 10:38-40. 38 and whoever ...


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In Matthew 15:11, Jesus was responding to the Pharisees who said: "Why do your disciples break the tradition of the elders? For they do not wash their hands when they eat." - Matthew 15:2 ESV Jesus replied: He answered them, "And why do you break the commandment of God for the sake of your tradition? - Matthew 15:3 ESV Jesus was telling the ...


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The answer to your question is hinted at in the scriptural verses prior to Matthew 10:34 (1-33) and in a tiny fragment from the NT that is the oldest part of the NT ever found. Matthew 10:1-33 These twelve Jesus sent forth... preach, saying: The kingdom of heaven is at hand... I send you forth as sheep in the midst of wolves... they will scourge you in ...


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The sword is an important symbol in Christian imagery, and does not always symbolize war and violence. In fact, the sword is a definitive symbol of the word of God. In the context of the passage you cite, history teaches us that the word of God is a source of discord among men. Consider these passages from the New Testament: (Hebrews 4:12 NASB) For the ...


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Why did Christ say he came as a sword? Matthew 10:32-35 Whosoever therefore shall confess me before men, him will I confess also before my Father which is in heaven. But whosoever shall deny me before men, him will I also deny before my Father which is in heaven. Think not that I am come to send peace on earth: I came not to send peace, but ...


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First, there is the argument from the ancient languages of Aramaic and Greek and how the words were used: First it is important to note that the Bible does not say that these "brothers and sisters" of Jesus were children of Mary. Second, the word for brother (or sister), adelphos (adelpha) in Greek, denotes a brother or sister, or near kinsman. ...


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The link you quote (which I will also link to here) explains the view of Catholics on this passage in some detail. The article explains how they interpret the passage, and gives examples of other places where 'brother' does not imply coming from the same womb. If it was a normal usage of the time, then there is no reason why people of Jesus' hometown would ...



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