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I think part of the difficulties in finding what this refers to are that: It appears to be a paraphrase and not a direct quotation. There appear to be multiple Hebrew words that could be associated with the Greek word Ναζωραῖος (Nazooraios) - Nazarene (there is a discussion of this here) Some Church Fathers associate the Greek Ναζωραῖος (Nazooraios) with ...


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I would like to add a bit more detail to Mike's answer. Samson was the one about whom the bible says, Behold, you shall conceive and bear a son. So then drink no wine or strong drink, and eat nothing unclean, for the child shall be a Nazirite to God from the womb to the day of his death.’ (Judges 13:7, ESV). There are several more verse which have dual ...


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I think the Church Fathers interpreted this verse as meaning that although we are invited by God, our actions will still determine our fate. Verse 14 needs, I think, to be considered along with the preceding verses: Matthew 22:11–14 (KJV 1900) And when the king came in to see the guests, he saw there a man which had not on a wedding garment: And he ...


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Although you are directing your question specifically towards Roman Catholics, I would point out that Eastern Orthodox also believe in transubstantiation as you define it, although different terms are sometimes used. So I will also comment on your question from an Eastern Orthodox perspective (to the best of my ability, God being my helper). In answer to ...


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I think the simplest explanation is simply that the Evangelists had slightly different recollections of events. The Church Fathers recognized that there were inconsistencies in the Gospel accounts and accepted them. John Chrysostom discussed this the first of his Homilies on the Gospel According to Matthew, written in the late 4th century: And why can ...


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No one today has actually seen Jesus in the flesh, Christian's do not believe in his sacrifice because they have physically seen him. We believe because God himself has opened our eyes to the truth, and we have recieved the Holy Spirit that allows us to see the great wonders of this world. Jesus does not say that Peter is the rock, he said on this rock, ...


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Fr. Cornelius à Lapide commentates on this verse: Lastly, theologians—and from them, catechists—out of various expositions of S. Augustine, collect six sins against the Holy Ghost; namely, presumption, despair, striving against known truth, envy of fraternal charity, impenitence, and obstinacy. They say that these are called sins against the Holy Ghost, ...


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Luke's order appears appealing to me and could be theological sound . He attested in his opening remarks in chapter 1:3 where he assures us of having carefully investigated everything. So Luke might have sought to correct the sequence of temptations to make it sound and complete.


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Act 13:30 But God raised him from the dead: Act 13:31 And he was seen many days of them which came up with him from Galilee to Jerusalem, who are his witnesses unto the people. God has been placing in my spirit revelation concerning Christ Death ,Burial, and resurrection. God kept dropping this scripture into my spirit. God kept speaking to me "...


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Jesus asks us to be his disciples. To follow him means to give up the ways of the world and follow his path and way of living. By taking up your cross you are accepting this and wish to give your life for Jesus, follow him, and be his disciple. When he says to take up your cross he does not mean go into the world and get yourself killed. Jesus died in shame ...


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Luke doesn't say Jesus prayed "only once", it records him praying without noting the particular detail of the three separate entreaties recorded in Matthew and Mark (although perhaps it is alluded to non-specifically in verse 44 - "he prayed more earnestly" in context suggests he prayed at least twice): 39 Jesus went out as usual to the Mount of Olives, ...



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