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31

The context of Matthew is adultery--relations with a woman who is not your wife. The context of Proverbs is marriage--relations with the woman who is your wife. The difference is quite substantial. “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall not commit adultery.’ 28 But I say to you that everyone who looks at a woman with lustful intent has already ...


28

Our command to love our enemies is intended for our human enemies, whom God also loves. God's love for us is shown through His sacrifice on the cross, and also in the statement that it is His desire that every man come to repentance. Satan, on the other hand, cannot come to repentance, and there is no hope for his redemption. A good answer with ...


24

Christ is using his ability to perform miracles as evidence that he is God, and therefore has the right and the ability to forgive sins. He is saying, anyone can say "Your sins are forgiven," without any evidence that they have the authority to do so. But only God can heal a paralytic. So by performing such a miracle, Christ is proving that he has the ...


24

Faulty Premise #1: John the Baptist was a reincarnation of Elijah When Jesus asked Peter who people said he was, he answered that some people thought that Jesus was Elijah come back. Peter knew better and said Jesus was the Christ. In any event, John the Baptist himself directly denied the claim (see John 1:19-21). What Jesus more likely was saying in ...


22

Isaiah 35:5-6a,10 NIV: Then will the eyes of the blind be opened   and the ears of the deaf unstopped. 6Then will the lame leap like a deer,   and the mute tongue shout for joy. (verse 10 shows context of Zion) 10 and those the LORD has rescued will return. They will enter Zion with singing;   everlasting joy will crown their ...


20

To me, this is a very offensive direction that Jesus gives. And that isn't a bad thing -- frequently the Bible gives directions that are offensive to what we are accustomed to believing. We should always take them seriously. In this case, I think the message is that we must put following Christ above everything, even our most important worldly concerns. ...


19

In addition to Affable Geek's answer, I would like to add this verse clearly showing that reincarnation is incompatible with Christianity, Hebrews 9:27: ... man is destined to die once, and after that to face judgment...


18

Jesus is the king of metaphors. This reference was not meant as an insult. To quote from Life Application Study Bible in reference to Matthew 15:24: Jesus' words do not contradict the truth that God's message is for all people. After all, when Jesus said these words, He was in Gentile territory on a mission to Gentile people. He ministered to Gentiles ...


18

There are two differences here: "from evil" (KJV) versus "from the evil one" (NIV) "for thine is the kingdom..." in the KJV but not the NIV. The first difference reflects an alternative translation choice for the Greek word "πονηροῦ". This might be in the masculine or the neuter gender - the word forms are the same. But there is a difference in meaning: ...


16

I don't think its meant to be interpreted literally. I take it as "Do everything you possibly can to avoid sinning." relevant example: I have a co-worker of refuses to go to the beach since he would be tempted to engage in lust-related activities. Whether you agree with my coworker's interpretation and level of devotion to the literal word is not my point. ...


15

In the next verse Jesus tells of how he will have to suffer, die, and rise again. Matthew 16:21 NIV 21 From that time on Jesus began to explain to his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and suffer many things at the hands of the elders, the chief priests and the teachers of the law, and that he must be killed and on the third day be raised ...


13

You must take verses 5 and 6 together, as they're a single statement. Christ has just told the paralyzed man that his sins are forgiven, and the teachers around Him that saw it believed His statement of forgiveness was blasphemy as only God can forgive sins. They failed to recognize that Christ was God. So, He then makes a point of showing them that it's ...


13

The Greek word is πυλαι and does literally mean "gates", and this is the only reference to the gates of Hades/Hell in the NT. It's also the first use of the word εκκλησια, "the called-out", "church". The gates of a city are the point at which attackers lay siege, the weakest point. The strength of a city is directly related to the strength or power of its ...


13

Jesus was attempting to hide the fact that he was the Messiah. But, it's not because he was afraid of the local authority. Rather, he was trying to delay the events of his death. He knew that the timing had to be perfect and these events recorded in Matthew were "too soon". Part 1: The secret In John 7, Jesus' disciples are going up to the festival. ...


13

Aside from the Jews for Jesus, I think all Christians take this the way Jesus meant it whether they know it or not. I won't copy and paste my answer from What is the Roman Catholic view on Matthew 23:9?, but the gist of it is, the Pharisees took pride in calling Abraham their Father, and the pride is what Jesus is doing away with. Not that the Gospels ...


13

There is no doubt this truly happened, but in many of the events in the gospels, they are the only records of the history which is why they written. I think when one gospel has something and the others do not, we can assume this is not to be central in our view of the ministry of Christ, but that it is important from the angle that the individual writer ...


13

According to this answer to a question I asked on the Biblical Hermeneutics SE, the original New Testament Greek does not have a phrase like "vain repetition"; instead, the word used, βαττολογησητε ("battologesete") simply means "to babble" or "to sound like one who is stammering". The word is onomatopoietic, and the sense seems to be "using words [not ...


12

In many ancient cultures, Hebrew included, the number seven often signifies completeness and/or perfection (for more information see either Numerical Sayings in the OT, W. Roth or IVP New Bible Dictionary, ed. Marshall, Miller, Packer, Wiseman, p834). Therefore, it is often used in an emphatic sense. This is seen in Peter's question: "should I forgive seven ...


12

In many languages today there is the equivalent of the English word "acquire." Like in Russian "priobrel" means acquire - in contrast "buy" in Russian would be kupit. in Azerbaijani language for "buy" we use a word "almaq" which has many meanings like buy, take, gain. and so this word acquire in the original Greek does not necessarily mean that someone put ...


12

In context: 21 From that time forth began Jesus to shew unto his disciples, how that he must go unto Jerusalem, and suffer many things of the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and be raised again the third day. 22 Then Peter took him, and began to rebuke him, saying, Be it far from thee, Lord: this shall not be unto thee. 23 ...


11

They both did - it just depends on perspective for application of the word "bought". It was Judas' money, and it was the priests who used the money he returned to them to buy the field. They bought the field because they could not accept blood money and return it to the temple treasury. In essence, the priests bought the field on behalf of Judas. This ...


11

Since the other three gospels are silent on this topic and it is not mentioned elsewhere in the NT (that I am aware of and I did some research before posting), I think the honest answer to this question is simply: nowhere. At least, not in this life. :) The MacArthur Study Bible says: Matthew alone mentions this miracle. Nothing more is said about ...


11

Phlegon freedman of the emperor Adrian was born at Tralles in Lydia. He was author of several works one of which was entitled "The Olympiads" or "A Collection of Olympiads and Chronicles" in sixteen books. It was a kind of general history of the world from the first to the two hundred and twenty ninth Olympiad or to the times of Adrian. "In the 4th year ...


10

Your two examples are two different numbers. Lamech speaks of seventy-seven times (77), while Jesus says seventy times seven (490). It's hard to say exactly what Lamech meant, as his story is badly incomplete--it doesn't say who he killed or why, or what happened after that. So it's difficult to draw any conclusions here. As for Jesus's answer to Peter, ...


10

First off, Jesus was speaking to a single archon - the "rich young ruler." Jesus told Peter to come out and walk on the water, but that doesn't mean I need to do the same :) There is nothing in the text to indicate that this is a generalized principle. Jesus was speaking to one person, and it is interesting how the exchange goes: If you want to enter ...


10

Refer to.. “Do you see all these great buildings?” replied Jesus. “Not one stone here will be left on another; every one will be thrown down.” Mark 13:2 And, “Do you see all these things?” he asked. “Truly I tell you, not one stone here will be left on another; every one will be thrown down.” Matthew 24:3 As well as, “As for ...


9

The theological term here is kenosis From Phillipians 2:6-7 though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied himself ... In short, Jesus gave up the perks of being God in order to identify with humanity.


9

If Jesus said He was not sent except to the lost sheep of the house of Israel, then that is certainly true. If we don't accept Jesus' own words as true, then it would be difficult to imagine what the qualifications for acceptance would be. So, yes, Jesus was sent to the lost sheep of the house of Israel. That does not mean, however, that Jesus, the ...


9

For the same reason so many other things from the Old Testament are mentioned in the New Testament: they're quotations. This particular one was a reference to the beginning of the 22nd psalm, and it's quite instructive to look at the psalm in its entirety. Of particular interest is verse 18, which had literally happened to him just moments ago. Jesus's ...


9

He was quoting David in Psalm 22. But nevertheless, Jesus must have felt these words Himself. What it was like for the Son of God to experience "Hell", or separation from God, we can not begin to imagine. We can only speculate that Jesus, when He uttered those words, felt God had abandoned Him in a real way, not a symbolic way. Jesus truly felt separated ...



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