Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

31

The context of Matthew is adultery--relations with a woman who is not your wife. The context of Proverbs is marriage--relations with the woman who is your wife. The difference is quite substantial. “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall not commit adultery.’ 28 But I say to you that everyone who looks at a woman with lustful intent has already ...


24

Christ is using his ability to perform miracles as evidence that he is God, and therefore has the right and the ability to forgive sins. He is saying, anyone can say "Your sins are forgiven," without any evidence that they have the authority to do so. But only God can heal a paralytic. So by performing such a miracle, Christ is proving that he has the ...


16

I don't think its meant to be interpreted literally. I take it as "Do everything you possibly can to avoid sinning." relevant example: I have a co-worker of refuses to go to the beach since he would be tempted to engage in lust-related activities. Whether you agree with my coworker's interpretation and level of devotion to the literal word is not my point. ...


14

In the next verse Jesus tells of how he will have to suffer, die, and rise again. Matthew 16:21 NIV 21 From that time on Jesus began to explain to his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and suffer many things at the hands of the elders, the chief priests and the teachers of the law, and that he must be killed and on the third day be raised ...


13

You must take verses 5 and 6 together, as they're a single statement. Christ has just told the paralyzed man that his sins are forgiven, and the teachers around Him that saw it believed His statement of forgiveness was blasphemy as only God can forgive sins. They failed to recognize that Christ was God. So, He then makes a point of showing them that it's ...


13

Aside from the Jews for Jesus, I think all Christians take this the way Jesus meant it whether they know it or not. I won't copy and paste my answer from What is the Roman Catholic view on Matthew 23:9?, but the gist of it is, the Pharisees took pride in calling Abraham their Father, and the pride is what Jesus is doing away with. Not that the Gospels ...


12

In many languages today there is the equivalent of the English word "acquire." Like in Russian "priobrel" means acquire - in contrast "buy" in Russian would be kupit. in Azerbaijani language for "buy" we use a word "almaq" which has many meanings like buy, take, gain. and so this word acquire in the original Greek does not necessarily mean that someone put ...


12

In many ancient cultures, Hebrew included, the number seven often signifies completeness and/or perfection (for more information see either Numerical Sayings in the OT, W. Roth or IVP New Bible Dictionary, ed. Marshall, Miller, Packer, Wiseman, p834). Therefore, it is often used in an emphatic sense. This is seen in Peter's question: "should I forgive seven ...


12

The Greek word is πυλαι and does literally mean "gates", and this is the only reference to the gates of Hades/Hell in the NT. It's also the first use of the word εκκλησια, "the called-out", "church". The gates of a city are the point at which attackers lay siege, the weakest point. The strength of a city is directly related to the strength or power of its ...


12

Jesus was attempting to hide the fact that he was the Messiah. But, it's not because he was afraid of the local authority. Rather, he was trying to delay the events of his death. He knew that the timing had to be perfect and these events recorded in Matthew were "too soon". Part 1: The secret In John 7, Jesus' disciples are going up to the festival. ...


12

In context: 21 From that time forth began Jesus to shew unto his disciples, how that he must go unto Jerusalem, and suffer many things of the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and be raised again the third day. 22 Then Peter took him, and began to rebuke him, saying, Be it far from thee, Lord: this shall not be unto thee. 23 ...


11

They both did - it just depends on perspective for application of the word "bought". It was Judas' money, and it was the priests who used the money he returned to them to buy the field. They bought the field because they could not accept blood money and return it to the temple treasury. In essence, the priests bought the field on behalf of Judas. This ...


10

Your two examples are two different numbers. Lamech speaks of seventy-seven times (77), while Jesus says seventy times seven (490). It's hard to say exactly what Lamech meant, as his story is badly incomplete--it doesn't say who he killed or why, or what happened after that. So it's difficult to draw any conclusions here. As for Jesus's answer to Peter, ...


10

Since the other three gospels are silent on this topic and it is not mentioned elsewhere in the NT (that I am aware of and I did some research before posting), I think the honest answer to this question is simply: nowhere. At least, not in this life. :) The MacArthur Study Bible says: Matthew alone mentions this miracle. Nothing more is said about ...


10

There is no doubt this truly happened, but in many of the events in the gospels, they are the only records of the history which is why they written. I think when one gospel has something and the others do not, we can assume this is not to be central in our view of the ministry of Christ, but that it is important from the angle that the individual writer ...


9

If Jesus said He was not sent except to the lost sheep of the house of Israel, then that is certainly true. If we don't accept Jesus' own words as true, then it would be difficult to imagine what the qualifications for acceptance would be. So, yes, Jesus was sent to the lost sheep of the house of Israel. That does not mean, however, that Jesus, the ...


9

I think the Pharisees understood quite well that their ancestors were not perfect. The fact that they did X does not make X right. The example of David that you bring up is a case in point: He was guilty of adultery and murder. The Bible is unusual in that it holds someone up as a hero at the same time that it freely recounts his character flaws -- sometimes ...


9

Jesus continuously said things that got to the heart of the matter. This example is no different. In your quote from Matthew we see a young man that wants to know what good thing he must do to get eternal life. Eventually, Jesus says what you have quoted. What the man then does and what Jesus says immediately after revels what Jesus meant. 22 When the ...


8

Great question! There are so many things about this verse that are so awesome. I would propose Jesus' answer has a two-fold answer. Part 1 First, Jesus says that we will not enter the kingdom of heaven unless we become like a child. We need to change our mindset and think like children think. Not that we become immature and act childish in the traditional ...


8

The ESV Study Bible includes this note about the purchase of the property in the Acts account: That is, the field was acquired indirectly by Judas, through the agency of the chief priests. As Matt. 27:3–7 records, Judas brought the 30 pieces of silver back to the chief priests and elders. The chief priests then purchased the potter’s field with Judas’s ...


8

The three uses of Law in Reformed1 and Lutheran2 theology explains this very well. One very important purpose of Law is to let us see our own unrighteousness, so that we could understand how dependent we are on the grace of God. It was clear from the Old Testament that people couldn't strictly follow the Law of God. Here Jesus makes it even clearer. ...


8

It does not mean: do not fight temptation to sin do not defend yourself Look at the context in which the passage is found: 38 Ye have heard that it hath been said, An eye for an eye, and a tooth for a tooth: 39 But I say unto you, That ye resist not evil: but whosoever shall smite thee on thy right cheek, turn to him the other also. 40 And ...


7

Physicality is not specified at all. Although you could make a case that online, we are in some manner physically present to each other. :) However, if you are together, praying, but gathered over great distances, I don't think there's any technicality in play, here. God doesn't work in technicalities, but in what's in our heart. So, I figure that yes, ...


7

The story of the Syro-Phoenician woman (Matthew 15 & Mark 7) is interesting in that it specifically is addressing the question of whether or not Jesus was sent to the Jews only, or to all mankind. A few backdrops In Genesis 12, God tells Abraham that he will make of Abraham a great nation (obvious assumption = Israel), but more importantly, that all ...


7

OK, you need some context here. The scribes and Pharasees were the Jews that took the most pride in following the law. These were the folks that did everything that the Old Testament told the people of Israel to do. All the prayers, all the ceremonies, all the feasts, all the sacrifices. These guys kept fully kept the letter of the law, and when they ...


7

No man can serve two masters: for either he will hate the one, and love the other; or else he will hold to the one, and despise the other. Ye cannot serve God and mammon. (Matthew 6:24) Money is a means of exchange. It is essential that we use money in our day to day activities. Usage of money does not mean we worship money. It is the love of money ...


7

Typically, there are two circumstances under which saying of the Hail Mary (specifically, as opposed to other prayers) is encouraged: In saying the prayer, or sequence of prayers, known as "the Rosary" As part of a common form of penance after Confession (for example, "For your penance, say ten Hail Marys and five Our Fathers.") Certainly in the first ...


6

Nope. The earliest manuscript fragment we have is p52. It dates to about 20 years after John wrote it. And, while it is likely that the apostles spoke Aramaic, there is nothing to conclusively prove they wrote in it. In any event, the apostles wouldn't have written it in their own hands. Most writing was done by an amanuensis - a guy who made the paper ...


6

In early times, salt was substantially more significant than it is today. (E.g., see the etymology for salarium at Wikipedia.) Salt has some association with holiness; it was part of the grain offerings (Leviticus 2:13 [NIV]): Season all your grain offerings with salt. Do not leave the salt of the covenant of your God out of your grain offerings, add ...


6

Salt fulfills a very specific purpose which other more valuable things do not. One significant thing salt is used for is as a preservative. In the age before refrigeration, this was very important. To apply this symbolically to followers of Christ, it would seem that they serve to preserve the purity of the world. As it was in the days of Noah, there is ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible