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34

Two things are significant. The first is that the curtain symbolically divided the Holy of Holies, the most revered place in the temple where God was believed to dwell and only priests were allowed to enter, from the rest of the temple where ordinary people were allowed. Removing that division was a symbol that there was now no barrier between ordinary ...


31

First understand the architecture of the temple. There were three chambers. A large courtyard where a very large altar lay. An indoor lobby where only the priests could enter after washing and finally the Holy room which only the high priest himself could enter. The Holy room contained the ark of the covenant. This room was shielded from the lobby by a ...


31

No, for a whole lot of reasons. Old Testament Law says that a man who has sex with an unmarried woman has to marry her. That would be unnecessary if having sex made them married. If that were the case, some teacher somewhere would be reminding people that they had to treat the people they had sex with as if they were wives. Tamar has sex with Judah because ...


16

This potential discrepancy is addressed at http://www.apologeticspress.org/apcontent.aspx?category=6&article=768 Possible resolutions to the discrepancies between the accounts: Possibility #1: Initially, both thieves reviled Christ, but then one of them repented. After hearing Jesus’ words on the cross, and seeing His forgiving attitude, the ...


16

There was no mandate that the gospels should appear in the order they were written once they were gathered into a collection. This is true of the rest of the New Testament as well. The order is the gospel accounts, the history of the early church, the letters of Paul to churches, to people, letters by other apostles, and prophecy. So, there ...


15

Short and sweet answer: No, otherwise fornication would be impossible.


13

This is the matter of some debate, and there are at least three theories about it that I'm familiar with. I actually found a study online that explains all of them here. Some relevant sections (copied and pasted since the author explains it better than I would): The one that is popular in my denomination: One explanation that is popular among ...


13

The very next chapter indicates that Ahimelek had a son named Abiathar. Priestly duties were typically within a given family at one time (eg Aaron and his sons). The title of "high priest", while alone at any given time, does not preclude there being other priests (otherwise Aaron and his sons would have all been "high priests" - whereas "high priest" ...


12

My experience is that this form of political correctness is an over-reaction against something that isn't really a problem anyway, and is intended to appease people who are offended by Christianity--most likely a small minority of vocal athiests and those with similar political views. I am never/would never be offended when a Jew wishes me a "Happy ...


11

The theological term here is kenosis From Phillipians 2:6-7 though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied himself ... In short, Jesus gave up the perks of being God in order to identify with humanity.


11

It is almost certain that this person is Matthew. In the parallel account of this narrative in the Gospel of Matthew, we see that Levi appears to be "renamed" Matthew. Matthew 9:9 (NIV) 9As Jesus went on from there, he saw a man named Matthew sitting at the tax collector’s booth. “Follow me,” he told him, and Matthew got up and followed him. It is ...


11

Let's go back and re-read the incident that prompted Jesus' teaching: And as he was setting out on his journey, a man ran up and knelt before him and asked him, “Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?” And Jesus said to him, “Why do you call me good? No one is good except God alone. You know the commandments: ‘Do not murder, Do not commit ...


11

What lies below is certainly not the only way to interpret this scripture, but it is one way I find extremely compelling, and to my knowledge, provides a reasonable historical understanding. This passage in scripture is built on a long foundation of culture and history, which is largely lost on a modern audience. First, a reminder about the immediately ...


9

Short answer, no. Not at all. It would count as plausible deniability to the straw-man definition of "the inspired and infallible word of God", but only to the false straw-man understanding. The problem is that, almost no denomination believes that inspiration and infallibility are attributed to modern versions/translations of Scripture. Inspiration ...


8

There are two theories in regards to this: Jesus is not part of God. See also: Is there Biblical basis for unitarianism? Jesus and God are joined in the Trinity, but separate in thought and will. See also: Biblical basis for the doctrine of the Trinity Would it have been possible for Jesus to sin? Take your pick.


8

The Veil: Its meaning Most scholars are in agreement on the ultimate conclusion and meaning of the tearing of the curtain. Perhaps none are so succinct as Ezra Palmer Gould in A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Gospel According to St. Mark stating: The rending of the vail would signify therefore the removal of the separation between God and the ...


7

These two different accounts in Luke 23:39 on one side and Mark 15:32 and Mathew 27:44 on other side can be reconciled. by supposing that, at first, both of them reviled the Saviour, and that it is of this fact that Matthew and Mark speaks. Afterwards one of them relented, and became penitent-- perhaps from witnessing the patient sufferings of Christ. It is ...


7

Demons can say pretty much whatever they want, lying or telling the truth as it suits them. Jesus had already been accused of consorting with demons by such groups as the Sanhedrin (for example, in Matthew 12:24). He refuted those claims, of course, but they kept coming up, so it's likely that at least some people believed them. In that context, a demon ...


7

It's because the church fathers thought Matthew was written first. Augustine writes: Now, those four evangelists whose names have gained the most remarkable circulation over the whole world [...] are believed to have written in the order which follows: first Matthew, then Mark, thirdly Luke, lastly John. (Harmony of the Gospels, 1.2) Eusebius reports ...


6

Jesus does not seem to consider merely being with a man to make him your husband. John 4:16-19 (DRA) 16 Jesus saith to her: Go, call thy husband, and come hither. 17 The woman answered, and said: I have no husband. Jesus said to her: Thou hast said well, I have no husband:     18 For thou hast had five husbands: and he whom thou now ...


6

I hate to answer your question with a question, but since this is a mystery, I don't think you can logically consign yourself to one of Richards options. Not that those ideas aren't logical, they just don't quite fit, or satisfy me as a Catholic. The commentary in the NABRE is not very useful, it just says not to doubt the veracity of the verse. But ...


6

Hmm, how do you get from "it is hard for the rich to enter Heaven" to "a Christian shouldn't buy any luxuries"? I think you need to present some logical argument why that follows. In practical terms, what do you define as "luxury"? You could survive with some basic food and shelter from the elements. Everything beyond that could be considered "luxuries". ...


6

As you rightly say, the sisters are not named in the Bible which means we have to look to other sources for this information. I think it's fair to say that overall we don't know for certain, but different churches have developed different teachings and traditions on this subject. The Roman Catholic Church teach that the word "sisters" is used purely ...


6

The New Testament was written in Greek, but the Greek text records Jesus' words in Aramaic (in Mark, Hebrew in Matthew). The Gospel writers transliterated the Aramaic (Mk 15) and Hebrew (Mt 27) into the Greek script. It is important here to distinguish between script and language. For instance, I can write in Spanish, Latin, German, English, etc. all with ...


6

Purple in the Roman Empire was associated with triumph, and came to be associated with the Emperors specifically. Along with the crown of thorns, the purple robe was a mocking symbol of Jesus' royalty.


5

If you're describing something that for example, the American president did before he was president you would still refer to him as President Obama would you not? Mark does not say that he was literally the high priest at the time. It was however, in his days - when he was alive.


5

It's Syriac. Matthew Henry's commentary in the sidebar at this link says Christ’s prayer was bantered by them that stood by (Mark 15:35, 36); because he cried, Eli, Eli, or (as Mark has it, according to the Syriac dialect) Eloi, Eloi, they said, He calls for Elias, though they knew very well what he said, and what it signified, My God, My God. Thus did ...


5

I assume you're refering to Mark 12:25 where it says: When the dead rise, they will neither marry nor be given in marriage; they will be like the angels in heaven. (NIV) First a couple of notes on context. This was the answer to a trick question from a group of Sadducees. The Sadducees were an elitist liberal group similar to the Pharisees, who were an ...



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