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I think the simplest explanation is simply that the Evangelists had slightly different recollections of events. The Church Fathers recognized that there were inconsistencies in the Gospel accounts and accepted them. John Chrysostom discussed this the first of his Homilies on the Gospel According to Matthew, written in the late 4th century: And why can ...


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The 11th century Byzantine commentator, Theophylact of Ohrid, who wrote a comprehensive commentary on the Gospels compiled from the writings of earlier Church Fathers, wrote: When the Lord says, which is given for you and which is shed for you, He does not mean that His Body was given and His Blood was shed only for the Apostles, but for human nature ...


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Jesus intended that the "Lord's Supper", as a sacrament or ordinance of the Christian church, be enacted wherever Christians gathered together in worship. We know this, in part, because God revealed it to Paul after his conversion to the Christian faith. For I have received of the Lord that which also I delivered unto you, that the Lord Jesus the same ...


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context Luke 22:15 And he said to them, "I have eagerly desired to eat this Passover with you before I suffer. Luke 22:20 In the same way, after the supper he took the cup, saying, "This cup is the new covenant in my blood, which is poured out for you. Matthew 26:28 This is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for ...


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Luke's order appears appealing to me and could be theological sound . He attested in his opening remarks in chapter 1:3 where he assures us of having carefully investigated everything. So Luke might have sought to correct the sequence of temptations to make it sound and complete.


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The short answer is human nature. The people of Jesus' time knew they needed help: Roman oppression, poverty, misery, religious confusion, division. Many false prophets and revolutionaries had arisen and failed to deliver. From their standpoint, any Jewish person would want proof that this new person promising help can deliver on his promise and not ...


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To the question as to why casting out demons was not enough to prove to some that he was the Christ, some believed that such power was not from God: 33 And when the demon had been cast out, the mute man spoke. And the crowds marveled, saying, "Never was anything like this seen in Israel." 34 But the Pharisees said, "He casts out demons by the prince of ...


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Peter was close to Jesus that night in the courtyard of the home of Caiaphas the High Priests home where Jesus was being tried and accused. In chapter 23 of the book Imitate their Faith published by Jehovah's Witnesses the evening of this occurrence is discussed in some detail and below I have inserted what it says as it picks up in the garden when the mob ...


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Luke doesn't say Jesus prayed "only once", it records him praying without noting the particular detail of the three separate entreaties recorded in Matthew and Mark (although perhaps it is alluded to non-specifically in verse 44 - "he prayed more earnestly" in context suggests he prayed at least twice): 39 Jesus went out as usual to the Mount of Olives, ...


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The Marcan-Matthean tradition and the (earlier) Pauline-Lucan tradition vary in how they record the institution of the Eucharist. Compare the reading from Mark and Matthew with Luke and Paul, where Paul records the institution of the Eucharist in 1 Corinthians 11:23-25: 23 For I received from the Lord what I also delivered to you, that the Lord Jesus on ...


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The answer really doesn't depend on any esoteric interpretation, at all. The term "son of man" is vague only if we forget the Semitic tongue of the authors, where they were saying "son of Adam." The genealogy of Yehoshua (Jesus) in Matthew is meant to show the answer to the promise given to Abraham, so it goes only that far. The genealogy of Yehoshua in ...



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