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30

There is a subtle difference in the responses of Zacharias and Mary. Zacharias says, in Luke 1:18 (NASB) Zacharias said to the angel, “How will I know this for certain? For I am an old man and my wife is advanced in years.” Zacharias is essentially asking the angel, "How do I know I can trust you? Prove it." Furthermore, Zacharias's only basis of ...


26

Up until this point, the disciples had operated under the aegis of both Roman and Jewish law. They were seen as just another group of disciples of some charismatic Rabbi. If he had some strange ideas he was teaching, well, so did plenty of others. But now, all that was about to change. He was going to be taken by the Jews, tried and convicted and put to ...


22

This passage is often used to bolster the claim that Jesus is not God. The usual misinterpretation is that Jesus is saying that He isn't good, because He isn't God. The opposite is true. In this passage, Jesus is establishing His deity. The Answering Islam site offers a fairly good explanation. Excerpt: In the central passage of chapter 10, Jesus ...


16

From Mathew Henry's Concise Commentary: Whatever we have, the property of it is God's; we have only the use of it, according to the direction of our great Lord, and for his honour. This steward wasted his lord's goods. And we are all liable to the same charge; we have not made due improvement of what God has trusted us with. The steward cannot deny it; ...


16

This potential discrepancy is addressed at http://www.apologeticspress.org/apcontent.aspx?category=6&article=768 Possible resolutions to the discrepancies between the accounts: Possibility #1: Initially, both thieves reviled Christ, but then one of them repented. After hearing Jesus’ words on the cross, and seeing His forgiving attitude, the ...


15

Historically, Mark is seen as one of Peter's disciples. The historian Papias in the 2nd Century refers to him as such. Likewise, the evidence in the narrative, for example, indicates that Peter was a significant source for most of the material, and most theologians accept Mark as "Peter's" Gospel. Also, its seeming indication that the Temple is still ...


13

But seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness; and all these things shall be added unto you. Matthew 6:33 This is what Mary was doing. Although what Martha was doing was not wrong, her focus was on those things and not on Jesus. Many people can get so caught up in church and completely forget about Jesus. Fixing things, making sure ...


13

The verse is part of a parable that Jesus taught. The parable seems intended to teach about the judgment of God at this point. It does not suggest that human governance should even follow this example. He merely uses what could and often did happen to illustrate a point of God's supreme governance. 11 As they heard these things, he proceeded to tell a ...


13

Side note: The issue isn't really about the doctrine of sola scriptura, but rather about literalism. "Sola scriptura" is a term used by Protestants to mean that we believe scripture is the only ultimate authority, as opposed to Catholic doctrines that the teachings of the Church fathers have equivalent or comparable authority to scripture. But nothing in ...


12

Jesus is talking here about the resurrection of the dead. Because of what Christ did all will live again. So yes you could die for the gospel but you would gain eternal life in Christ. Just adding some scripture to back this up: (KJV) 1 Corinthians 15:42 So also is the resurrection of the dead. It is sown in corruption; it is raised in incorruption: ...


12

With parables you have to remember that they are directed at a specific audience, and make a specific point. Trying to extrapolate to draw conclusions outside the purpose of the parable would lead to a wrong conclusion. Parables are also used to illustrate general principles, not to lay down hard and fast rules. In the Parable of the Talents, the point is ...


12

As one who formerly (in ignorance) used to promote the same argument (not being a Jehovah's Witness, but somewhat associated with the Arian theology), the argument is not that the Greek text was corrupted, but rather, that the comma in the English translation should be placed after "today" rather than before it. They are able to make this argument because ...


11

I think it is significant that the rich man knows and uses Lazarus's name for the same reason that it's significant that he knows Moses name. It clearly shows that he knew who the man was and had been aware in life of his condition and done nothing about it -- in the same way he did not heed the teachings of Moses and the prophets. Leon Morris also suggests ...


11

The only way that I have ever had this explained to me which has made any sense was by my Biblical Hebrew professor. Basically, "Unjust manager" can mean, in Aramaic, "manager of the unjust." Basically: He wasn't unjust, he governed the unjust. He got caught up in one of his subordinate's scandals He cut out his commission (the top 20%) of the debt from ...


11

It should be noted that the entire Jewish race began with a miraculous birth of an old man and woman who was "past the age of childbearing". Additionally, women who were barren became mothers through the provision of God--not only Sarah, but Rebekah and Rachel as well. Then Abraham fell on his face and laughed and said to himself, "Shall a child be ...


11

It is almost certain that this person is Matthew. In the parallel account of this narrative in the Gospel of Matthew, we see that Levi appears to be "renamed" Matthew. Matthew 9:9 (NIV) 9As Jesus went on from there, he saw a man named Matthew sitting at the tax collector’s booth. “Follow me,” he told him, and Matthew got up and followed him. It is ...


11

What lies below is certainly not the only way to interpret this scripture, but it is one way I find extremely compelling, and to my knowledge, provides a reasonable historical understanding. This passage in scripture is built on a long foundation of culture and history, which is largely lost on a modern audience. First, a reminder about the immediately ...


10

That very part was to fulfill the scriptures written by Isaiah which he cited. Isaiah 53:12 (KJV) 12  [...] because he hath poured out his soul unto death: and he was numbered with the transgressors; and he bare the sin of many, and made intercession for the transgressors. Link it also to the fact that he was on the cross in the middle of 2 ...


10

This is a parable, so the fact that "a man of noble birth" is third person is rather irrelevant. It's pretty obvious he's symbolizing someone, probably Jesus. Context. Verse 11 reads: As they heard these things, he proceeded to tell a parable, because he was near to Jerusalem, and because they supposed that the kingdom of God was to appear immediately. ...


10

The similarity between Elijah and John the Baptists is understood the same way by most Protestant Commentaries including John Wesley’s. This is understood to mean: With the same integrity, courage, austerity, and fervour, and the same power attending his word (John Wesley's Notes, Luke 1:17) However to understand this brief comment by Wesley one ...


10

Following Christ in many countries carries a significant price to pay in many places of the world. In fact, the decision to become a Christian often results in being ostracized from one's family and even worse. Even within some Christian traditions, the decision to leave the tradition of one's family to join another tradition is met with exclusion from the ...


10

There are two facets to the answer, one regarding the nature of the sin offering itself, and one regarding Mary’s motivations for making the offering. In summary, in Israel, so-called “sin” offerings were offered for transgressions agains the ritual law, not so much for offenses against the moral law. Moreover, just as Jesus submitted himself to the ...


9

I'm not a scholar but I suspect that Jesus responded as a rabbi might. The custom was for potential disciples to approach a rabbi whom they wanted to follow. If the rabbi was interested he'd ask them questions to determine if they were suitable cantidates. If not be would send them away and they would go home and take the trade of their father. If he ...


9

In Luke's gospel, this parable is preceded by the parable of The Lost Son, and in both stories Jesus presents us with a character who has "squandered" money (Squandered - Gk: diaskorpizo appears in both parables). It is worth noting that both characters find mercy, despite their initial actions. Whereas in The Lost Son parable, it is the warm forgiveness of ...


9

In the case of the devils wanting to have permission to enter the pigs rather than be cast into no particular place it seems to be under a simple desire of destruction. The demons are enraged to destroy and in this story we clearly see the bounds of the destruction they seek are under the power of God. They are tied to a divine leash, not being permitted to ...


9

Matthew 18 also cites Jesus' words regarding little ones, and does so more frequently: At that time the disciples came to Jesus, saying, “Who is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven?” 2 And calling to him a child, he put him in the midst of them 3 and said, “Truly, I say to you, unless you turn and become like children, you will never enter the ...


9

Translation philosophy The translator's job is to pick the best word(s) to fit their translation philosophy. This could mean the most "literal" (i.e. technically accurate, ignoring connotations) term, or it could mean trying to most accurately capture the intent of the original author, even if that means changing the words. The first option is called ...


9

Most adherents of sola scriptura are memorialist in their understanding of the Eucharist. This means they believe Jesus was using a metaphor (albeit one God had intentionally set up beforehand). In the same way that the Scapegoat prefigured Christ*, or the Rock that Moses beat instead of struck prefigured Christ, so too the bread in the Passover prefigured ...


9

Jesus' answer emphasizes what is more important. It is more important that a person hear the word of God and obey it than to be chosen by God for some special task. Not everyone will be chosen for a special position, but anyone can choose to obey God. Jesus puts things regarding (his own) family into perspective: they are not as important as seeking the ...


9

We do not know exactly where heaven or hell is. However, in Scripture, the word "up" is commonly used in association with the location of heaven and "down" is typically associated with the location of hell, either figuratively or literally. Also, from the vantage point of heaven, earth is down. The "up" and "down" context may certainly be completely ...



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