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20

Up until this point, the disciples had operated under the aegis of both Roman and Jewish law. They were seen as just another group of disciples of some charismatic Rabbi. If he had some strange ideas he was teaching, well, so did plenty of others. But now, all that was about to change. He was going to be taken by the Jews, tried and convicted and put to ...


12

This potential discrepancy is addressed at http://www.apologeticspress.org/apcontent.aspx?category=6&article=768 Possible resolutions to the discrepancies between the accounts: Possibility #1: Initially, both thieves reviled Christ, but then one of them repented. After hearing Jesus’ words on the cross, and seeing His forgiving attitude, the ...


12

Jesus is talking here about the resurrection of the dead. Because of what Christ did all will live again. So yes you could die for the gospel but you would gain eternal life in Christ. Just adding some scripture to back this up: (KJV) 1 Corinthians 15:42 So also is the resurrection of the dead. It is sown in corruption; it is raised in incorruption: ...


10

But seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness; and all these things shall be added unto you. Matthew 6:33 This is what Mary was doing. Although what Martha was doing was not wrong, her focus was on those things and not on Jesus. Many people can get so caught up in church and completely forget about Jesus. Fixing things, making sure ...


9

That very part was to fulfill the scriptures written by Isaiah which he cited. Isaiah 53:12 (KJV) 12  [...] because he hath poured out his soul unto death: and he was numbered with the transgressors; and he bare the sin of many, and made intercession for the transgressors. Link it also to the fact that he was on the cross in the middle of 2 ...


8

As Jesus Himself said Luke 8:46: I know that power has gone out from me. So presumably He noticed the touch because at the same moment power had gone from Him. So to answer the rest of your question, why only this person? Here it helps to notice that this story is also told in Matthew 9:18-26 and Mark 5:21-43, because they draw out different details. ...


8

Jesus is here asking the Pharisees a rhetorical question, that is - what would be easier for him to say if he was not God. The answer is simple - it is easier for a mere man to say "Your sins are forgiven", because there is no outward immediate manifestation. It is much more difficult to say "Stand up and walk", because it would be readily apparent that ...


8

Historically, Mark is seen as one of Peter's disciples. The historian Papias in the 2nd Century refers to him as such. Likewise, the evidence in the narrative, for example, indicates that Peter was a significant source for most of the material, and most theologians accept Mark as "Peter's" Gospel. Also, its seeming indication that the Temple is still ...


8

Following Christ in many countries carries a significant price to pay in many places of the world. In fact, the decision to become a Christian often results in being ostracized from one's family and even worse. Even within some Christian traditions, the decision to leave the tradition of one's family to join another tradition is met with exclusion from the ...


8

Christians do not believe that the Bible was dictated by God in the same sense that Muslims believe the Quran was dictated to Muhammed. They believe that God inspired the writers, through their own knowledge and personalities, to write the things that God wanted his people to know and remember. Because of this it is possible for an author to write inspired ...


8

Jesus' answer emphasizes what is more important. It is more important that a person hear the word of God and obey it than to be chosen by God for some special task. Not everyone will be chosen for a special position, but anyone can choose to obey God. Jesus puts things regarding (his own) family into perspective: they are not as important as seeking the ...


7

The similarity between Elijah and John the Baptists is understood the same way by most Protestant Commentaries including John Wesley’s. This is understood to mean: With the same integrity, courage, austerity, and fervour, and the same power attending his word (John Wesley's Notes, Luke 1:17) However to understand this brief comment by Wesley one ...


7

The next verse, Luke 8:26, places the event: They sailed to the region of the Gerasenes, which is across the lake from Galilee. Galilee is on the west side of the Sea of Galilee, which means that the Gerasenes were likely on the east side.


6

These two different accounts in Luke 23:39 on one side and Mark 15:32 and Mathew 27:44 on other side can be reconciled. by supposing that, at first, both of them reviled the Saviour, and that it is of this fact that Matthew and Mark speaks. Afterwards one of them relented, and became penitent-- perhaps from witnessing the patient sufferings of Christ. It is ...


6

The word "vocation," the word that many people use to describe their line of work, means "calling." To say that vocations outside of the ministry are not part of God's work is deny what many protestants believe about work. Just to cite one prominent example, Martin Luther writes: God is milking the cows through the vocation of the milkmaid and ...


6

The normal way to find out what a Bible passage means is to look at a Bible Commentary. These are detailed books, explaining each passage of the Bible. Any Christian bookstore will have many to choose from. There are also a number online, though they tend to be old ones that have gone out of copyright. I'm going to direct you to Matthew Henry's Commentary, ...


6

It's easier to understand this when you compare it to the widow and the judge parable. The judge ignores the women, but she keeps pressing to get her way and finally the judge breaks down and gives the widow what she wants. In the same way, if you go to your friends house late at night asking for something, he will not give it to you just because you are ...


6

Man was created for a loving relationship with God, therefore the first and greatest commandment: Mark 12:30 …thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind, and with all thy strength: this is the first commandment. Why do we love God? 1 John 4:19 We love him, because he first loved us. We know ...


5

I don't think you'll get a definitive answer on this one. There's no other reference in Scripture, so there's nothing to cross-reference. My hunch is that some people would and some wouldn't, the same way some people in my Church would know who Ray Comfort is, and some wouldn't. It might simply be the habit of recording familial lines to avoid confusion ...


5

Luke 10:38-42 As Jesus and his disciples were on their way, he came to a village where a woman named Martha opened her home to him. She had a sister called Mary, who sat at the Lord’s feet listening to what he said. But Martha was distracted by all the preparations that had to be made. She came to him and asked, "Lord, don’t you care that my sister has ...


5

There's a lot of baggage that comes with belief, but it's simple to explain: God exists and he is pure spirit God made Angels which are pure spirit Some Angels are good Some Angels are bad God made the world God made people with a body and a spirit Humanity's ability to comprehend this ends at "people with a body". Philosophers can come up with the ...


5

I believe so. Popular thought on the subject agree that Bartholomew and Nathanael are the same person. While there is no passage in the Bible that directly says "Bartholomew is Nathanael," circumstantial evidence points in that direction. Arguments can be made either way; church tradition points toward them being one and the same. Arguments for: First, ...


5

From the Tyndale Bible Dictionary: SILOAM, TOWER OF Edifice that collapsed, killing 18 people. Jesus compared those killed by the fallen tower to the rest of the people living in Jerusalem (Lk 13:4–5). Though nothing is known of this tower, it seems reasonable to conclude that it was situated in Jerusalem. Perhaps it can be identified with the great ...


5

Yes, there is no middle ground. The language here is that of worship; the idea is that mammon is an alternative god to God. The stress here from Jesus, and throughout the New Testament (1 Timothy 6:3-10 comes to mind), is that mammon, or money, is to be used to serve the Trinity, rather than to be served as god itself. This is the antithesis to what has ...


4

I don't have any single resource to cite, at the moment. But, I can offer the general understanding that I've gotten listening to Catholic sermons over time. Consider the verse in its context. 27 “But to you who hear I say, love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, 28 bless those who curse you, pray for those who mistreat you. 29 To the ...


4

I don't see that there's a definitive answer to this. There doesn't seem to be a whole lot of consensus on this one. Even the major commentaries, which usually find some common ground, disagree. A few examples: Clarke's Commentary on the Bible (This agrees with the teachings I've heard on this verse.) Ask them not again - Or, Do not beg them ...


4

Jesus was saying that the Kingdom of God has a huge effect on whatever it interacts with. That is, the effect is disproportionately large in comparison to what we mortals perceive the Kingdom of God to be. The Kingdom of God refers to more than just Heaven. The Kingdom of God also includes his people, many of whom are still here on Earth.


4

God is always telling us that we need to bear good fruit and that every tree that does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire. Matthew 3:10 NIV The ax is already at the root of the trees, and every tree that does not produce good fruit will be cut down and thrown into the fire. However, at the same time God is kind and patient ...


4

Matthew and Luke had different purposes for their genealogies. Matthew wrote his gospel to present Jesus as King of the Jews. Therefore, his genealogy traces Jesus' descent from Abraham (father of the Hebrew nation) through the royal line of David and Solomon. Luke presented Jesus as the Son of Man and showed his descent from Adam (the first man). The ...


4

This will seem highly unsatisfying to some, obvious to others, and deeply comforting to yet others. There is no indication that Jesus didn't know or feel the needs of anyone else. The passage simply shows that He chose this woman above the others. So the question becomes, "why did He choose this woman?" The obvious answer is "for the same reason He did ...



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