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No. The Pilate of John 18:28 was the Roman procurator of Judea in Jesus' day. Pilate was the civil authority who thought he had the power to turn Jesus over to the Jews to be crucified. A procurator was any of various imperial officials with fiscal or administrative powers. The equivalent today might be a governor. Regarding the "nobleman" in John 4:46-54, ...


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It was what Jesus was charged with - at least the complain the Jewish priests took to the Romans. The Romans usually placed the charge - in this case, claiming to be "King of the Jews" and thus challenging the Roman Emperor and Roman rule - on the top of the cross, to show the people why a person was crusified... probably to discourage other from the same ...


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Crucifixion was more than a method of execution; it was a public execution, and a long, slow, exceptionally painful one at that. Half the point was to make an example of the condemned so they could act as a deterrent. Part of the process was to identify the person and their crime, which was done by putting a sign on the cross. Thing is, Pilate couldn't ...


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It must be noted that John 7:53-8:11 is not found in Both Aramaic NT known as Aramaic Peshitta and the earliest Greek NT manuscripts (Papyrus 66, Papyrus 75, Codex Vaticanus, and Codex Sinaiticus). So Both Aramaic NT Scholars and Greek NT scholars believe that this is not part of the original. So John 7:53-8:11 is popularly known as "Pericope de Adultera." ...



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