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21

This isn't a question that can be resolved indisputably here, as there are different views amont Christians about this. These views are generally in a range of: Pelagianism - the idea that a man's salvation is an act of his free will only. Synergysm - the idea that a man needs grace, but has to freely cooperate with it. Irresistible grace - that grace ...


20

The theological problem is to explain why Jesus apparently trusted Judas, when he ought to have known better. There are a lot of possible answers! Some have tried to find symbolic or exemplary meaning in his actions - a lesson for the future Church. Others have centered the discussion around the character of Jesus, perhaps reaching similar conclusions for ...


18

There are two ways to read that. Reading it as an arrogant statement is certainly one, but I think it can also be read exactly the opposite way -- as a sign of humility. Not wanting to name himself in a "me, John, I was there see" way, he simply refers to himself based on his identity in relation to Christ. As a Christian I think this is great way to think ...


18

The ESV renders the verse in question: That disciple whom Jesus loved therefore said to Peter, “It is the Lord!” When Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord, he put on his outer garment, for he was stripped for work, and threw himself into the sea. It seems to contain the implication that he was wearing some kind of inner garment while working, and ...


15

This can be answered by answering a more general question: what does "in someone's (anyone's) name" mean? It means to act by proxy, on the authority of something or someone greater than yourself. It's a concept that our culture has kind of lost, though it still exists as a storytelling trope. When a medieval herald reads a proclamation "in the name of the ...


15

Safe answer: John 20 is the only passage of scripture that discusses this event, so the short answer is - we can't say for sure. In general, we need to be cautious about "reasoning from an absence of scripture." My guess: Thomas made a statement to the effect of "I refuse to believe that Jesus rose from the dead, and the only thing that could change my ...


15

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. (John 1:1, NIV) All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness. (2 Timothy 3:16, NIV) The Greek word for 'Word' in John 1:1 is Logos(λόγος) and 'Scripture' in 2 Timothy 3:16 is Graphey(γραφή). Though ...


14

It is obvious from the text of John 4:22 that Jesus was not the one actually performing the dipping, but his apostles. The idea here is that the apostles were baptizing on his behalf. Because they were baptizing in his name, it was, in essence, Jesus baptizing. We, today, have the power to do the same thing: Matthew 28:19 (NIV) Therefore go and make ...


14

The quick answer is "No." However, there has been a lot of speculation on this. We do know that the accusers of the woman left without stoning her after Jesus said, "He who is without sin among you, let him cast the first stone at her," but apparently none of them left before He did this. We also know that the older ones were the first to leave. So, what ...


14

The Greek text of John 3:13 according to Robert Estienne’s 1550 Textus Receptus states, καὶ οὐδεὶς ἀναβέβηκεν εἰς τὸν οὐρανὸν εἰ μὴ ὁ ἐκ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ καταβάς ὁ υἱὸς τοῦ ἀνθρώπου ὁ ὤν ἐν τῷ οὐρανῷ which is translated as, And no one ascended into heaven except he who descended out of heaven, the Son of man who is in heaven. There are some who ...


13

It's rather ironic — the thrust of your question is "Why did God wait so long?" Andrew Lloyd Webber asks the exact opposite question — "Why come so early?" As Judas sings in the finale: Every time I look at you I don't understand Why you let the things you did Get so out of hand You'd have managed better If you'd had it planned Now why'd you ...


13

When you look at Jesus' command in light of the whole law, and other instances where He said similar things (such as "be ye as perfect as your father in heaven"), you realize that while this is a command, it's really just a repetition of all the previous commands given by God over thousands of years. Jesus' command is just a reaffirmation of what God has ...


13

The internal evidence of the authorship is found in four passages in the Book of Revelation. It is in these four passages that the author refers to himself as "John". Rev 1:1 This is the revelation of Jesus Christ, which God gave him to show his servants the things that must happen soon. He made it known by sending his angel to his servant John, Rev ...


12

Mark 15:7-15 7 And among the rebels in prison, who had committed murder in the insurrection, there was a man called Barabbas. 8 And the crowd came up and began to ask Pilate to do as he usually did for them. 9 And he answered them, saying, “Do you want me to release for you the King of the Jews?” 10 For he perceived that pit was out of envy that the ...


12

Side note: The issue isn't really about the doctrine of sola scriptura, but rather about literalism. "Sola scriptura" is a term used by Protestants to mean that we believe scripture is the only ultimate authority, as opposed to Catholic doctrines that the teachings of the Church fathers have equivalent or comparable authority to scripture. But nothing in ...


11

In the story, everyone there recognised that they were sinners, including the top religious leaders. We should recognise that in ourselves also, no matter how 'good' we try to be. Jesus' compassion is not just for the woman but also for all of us. This comes to the heart of Christianity and is the whole point of John's Gospel: everyone has sinned/rebelled ...


11

When the angel came to Zechariah to announce the birth of John, he said that the child would be "filled with the Holy Spirit, even from his mother's womb. (Lk 1:15)" Also, Jesus said of John that "all the Prophets and the Law prophesied until John. (Mt 11:13)" It seems most reasonable to view him as a prophet like those of the OT, that he was commissioned ...


11

Here are a few commentaries on this verse from Christian Bible scholars. To a large extent, they agree with your suspicion that the men were reacting to Messiah's use of the words "I AM," and the authority with which he spoke them. Parenthetical notes are the original authors'. From Elliot's commentary for English Readers: They went backward, and fell ...


10

Here is one of those times where context helps quite a bit. John 10:33-36 (NIV)  33 “We are not stoning you for any good work,” they replied, “but for blasphemy, because you, a mere man, claim to be God.”  34 Jesus answered them, “Is it not written in your Law, ‘I have said you are “gods”’? 35 If he called them ‘gods,’ to whom the ...


10

Many Christians disagree on the topic, but as my personal view is that Christians can not walk away from their salvation, I will make a case for that here. You are correct that John 10:29 does not necessarily preclude the possibility walking away from ones own salvation. And you are also correct that one interpretation of Hebrews 6:4-6 is that believers ...


9

Most likely because he didn't want to gain a lot of notoriety so early on, and doing something like this, especially in such a public setting, would cause a lot of people to notice. But in the end, he did it, probably because it was his mother asking, and he was required by the Ten Commandments to honor his father and his mother.


9

OK, you wanna go deep? Here we go. From the Apostolic Bible: Love The word being translated as "loved" here is ἀγαπάω (agapao). Definition from Strong's Concordance (25): to love; in the NT usually the active love of God for his Son and his people, and the active love his people are to have for God, each other, and even enemies to love, ...


9

There is some fun linguistic gymnastics going on there and two things are being played off of each other. First, remember that Jesus was fully God and he was omniscient* and knew the hearts of men. He knew what people were thinking even when they didn't say it. Now note that while your question is in 24, the play here starts in verse 23. Let's look at ...


9

John's Gospel does not contain many of the things recorded in the Synoptics, including the Sermon on the Mount, the Transfiguration, the virgin birth, the Great Commission, and the Ascension. In fact, the only miracle outside of the Resurrection that appears in both the Synoptic gospels and John's gospel is the feeding of the 5,000. This doesn't mean that ...


9

Most adherents of sola scriptura are memorialist in their understanding of the Eucharist. This means they believe Jesus was using a metaphor (albeit one God had intentionally set up beforehand). In the same way that the Scapegoat prefigured Christ*, or the Rock that Moses beat instead of struck prefigured Christ, so too the bread in the Passover prefigured ...


9

Leo the Great wrote for the Council of Chalcedon in 451, It does not belong to the same nature to say, "I and the Father are one," and to say, "The Father is greater than I." For although there is in the Lord Jesus Christ a single person who is of God and of man, the insults shared by both have their source in one thing, and the glory that is shared in ...


8

I believe Jesus is talking about His public ministry, not about any miracle. A closer reading of John 2:1-12 can bring out some possibilities as follows. Mary knew about Jesus's power and His calling. (Events in His childhood described in Gospel of Mathew and Luke points to that). She would have probably witnessed His power in events which happened in ...


8

Part 1: The secret This phrase is actually recorded in a couple places in the gospel of John. In John 7, Jesus' disciples are going up to the festival. Jesus, however, did not want to appear publicly: John 7:6 (NIV) Therefore Jesus told them, “My time is not yet here; for you any time will do. Later, it says, he decides to go in secret: John ...


8

Apparently Nathanael took it as evidence of some kind of supernatural knowledge on Jesus' part, but his reaction seems to be overblown - Maybe Jesus just happened to be passing by that tree and recognized him from earlier! I think his dramatic response tells us about Nathanael's personality - impulsive perhaps, certainly an all-or-nothing sort of guy. ...


8

Though not a Greek scholar, I would contend that translating philo as like is a poor translation. Agape typically connotes the perfect love that God has and to which we can only aspire (though aspire to it we must, just as we aspire to imitate Christ though we can only do so imperfectly). On the other hand, philo connotes the love between two persons which ...



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