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27

This is called the problem of theodicy. The assumptions usually made in the problem statement are, with a little variance: God is almighty and all-knowing God does not want evil in the world God is good The problem goes on to state the fact that there is evil in the world, and claims a contradiction between the assumptions and this observation. I see ...


18

From the perspective of a non-Christian, the explanation you put forth makes no sense. It relies on a number of assumptions that a non-Christian doesn't necessarily hold. Regardless of whether it makes sense in the context of your belief system, it does not make sense to a non-Christian. For example: If evil is the result of the actions of Adam and Eve, ...


18

No. God's ways and thoughts are so much above ours it's difficult to understand. Isaiah 55:8-9 (NLT)  8 “My thoughts are nothing like your thoughts,” says the Lord.       “And my ways are far beyond anything you could imagine.  9 For just as the heavens are higher than the earth, ...


14

In addition to the Isaiah reference listed by Dancek, the end of Job asks powerful questions of a mortal who dared to question God's motives: Job 38 1-3 (NIV) 1 Then the LORD spoke to Job out of the storm. He said: 2 “Who is this that obscures my plans with words without knowledge? So no, humans cannot judge whether God is fair from our ...


13

The quote is from 1 Tim 6:10 (which would have been written in Greek, not Hebrew). The Greek reads: ῥίζα γὰρ πάντων τῶν κακῶν ἐστιν ἡ φιλαργυρία Here are some translations: KJV: For the love of money is the root of all evil ASV, NRSV, TNIV: For the love of money is a root of all kinds of evil NET: For the love of money is the root of all ...


11

If you're asking for an answer from a Christian perspective, which implies that you will accept, for the purposes of the answer, the presuppositions inherent in a "Christian answer" such as that God is who the Bible claims he is... You're making a false assumption in the question. Good or evil are not concepts that man made up and applied to God. Good and ...


10

Since sin is in essence any act of disobedience towards God or disbelief and we know that God is good1 we can conclude that there are no evil acts which are not sins. 1In fact good and evil are defined by and measured against His nature.


10

There is no moral standard apart from the person of God. God is not Himself subjected to some outside standard of reference, He is the standard that we reference. Since we also know that He is good, we can be certain that nothing He commands will ever bee morally despicable. @Joel Coehoorn nailed in in a comment. Yes, actions are morally good because God ...


10

Jonathan already explained from a Biblical perspective how God is a God of hate as well as love. I will try not to duplicate that. The 'problem of evil' is utterly unrelated to the attribute of hate. Evil and hate are not at all the same thing. God is good: 100% pure good. He is, in fact, the only standard of what good is; we measure whether something is ...


8

One concrete example from the Bible of a prophet judging God is from the book of Habakkuk. The book begins with the prophet Habakkuk judging God for His inaction: Habakkuk 1:2-4 2 How long, O LORD, will I call for help, And You will not hear? I cry out to You, “Violence!” Yet You do not save. 3 Why do You make me see iniquity, And cause me ...


8

I think you have a good reason for why evil exists, but I would follow that with suffering exists because evil exists. I don't agree that all suffering is punishment from God. He may allow for suffering, because He can use it in our lives to make us perfect. Another root reason is that God allows for our free will. He does not want us to be robot ...


8

Christian theology holds that God is holy, righteous, omnipotent, and unchanging (among other things). So, not only is He holy and righteous, but He has all power to maintain His holiness and never change. All He does is consistent with His character, and His character is holiness and righteousness. Additionally, God is complete in Himself and has need of ...


8

Joel's answer is a good one, but I would just add that the question is really one that's sort of loaded with certain presupposed authority. For anything to be deemed objectively right or wrong, then that thing needs to be measured against some sort of authoritative transcendent standard (a standard that supercedes the thing in question). In order for God ...


8

Pious Christians tend to overlook a very simple truth about sin. In the short term, it is fun. And why is it fun? Because as Jesus said (John 3:19): Men love darkness, rather than the light. And why do men love darkness rather than light? Solomon noted (Proverbs 14:12): There is a way that seems right to a man, but the end thereof is death ...


7

I think you're reading this particular passage out of context. The verses you cite are immediately followed by what is called the "fruits of the spirit". In context the passage says: 16 So I say, walk by the Spirit, and you will not gratify the desires of the flesh. 17 For the flesh desires what is contrary to the Spirit, and the Spirit what is ...


7

The question I will try to answer is: Can anyone please offer any explanation as to how a totally-good God can create evil deliberately and still remain holy and righteous? I will attempt to explain this from the point of Original Sin. This is becuse I myself struggled to understand this for some time and found that this can be explained better from that ...


7

The Bible does not anywhere indicate that the ‘most’ evil people are killed directly by God. God rather often, according to the purposes of his will, postpones the eternal judgment for sin a long while. Even the very worst of criminals may live long and prosperous lives and we must not expect full justice in this world. The injustice in the world is part ...


6

There are two basic approaches: 1. Blame Mankind Evil and suffering exist because of mankind's disobedience to God. Exactly how this works is more difficult to comprehend. Certainly a lot of suffering is the direct result of man's actions, but other types of suffering - things like natural disasters - can't be justified quite so easily. They may be ...


6

Because God gave us free will. He is not interested in puppets on a string who just hop to his commands. He is interested in followers who of their own free will accept the knowledge of God. Free will cannot (Without being internally coherent) exist and the choice to do evil not. So it looks like God could either have created a puppet humanity with no ...


6

Deriving from the topics of Original Sin and Common Grace, I would argue that the answer is "both". Let me expand. Our born nature is that of a sinner - one who cannot obtain God's favor on his own. However, we also have natural tendencies to take care of immediate family (Matthew 5:47 "If you greet only your brothers, what more are you doing than others? ...


6

The Westminster Confession of Faith (the doctrinal standard for many Presbyterians), Chapter III, makes it clear that at least one well recognized portion of Calvinists firmly rejects the claim that God is the author of evil (emphasis added): I. God from all eternity did by the most wise and holy counsel of his own will, freely and unchangeably ordain ...


6

Taking an action based on your belief is not the same as acting in faith, if the thing you are placing your faith into has criteria which do specify the requirements for being a true member of that faith. The Christian faith sets out the criteria which will indicate if the follower is truly faithful. These criteria are set out in the words and example of ...


5

This is what is commonly known as the Euthyphro's dilemma I can show everyone to the excellent podcast on Dr. William Lane Craig's podcast on it on his website. It is a common objection that atheist have against the moral argument for his existence. Here is the link to the podcast ...


5

I have never read a line that claimed God or life in general was "fair". Fairness seems to be a concept that we have developed to evaluate our interactions with each other. In addition fairness is largely subjective and relative. Is there a need for fairness in our dealings with God? I suspect that if you consider what God offers for devotion and ...


5

In my understanding there are different kinds of evil. A Christian needs to be able to discern between the different evils that are in this world. God knew that men would be evil, this is probably the reason why He created a realm just for man to reside within because God was probably not willing to let us defile the heavens. God disciplining His children. ...


5

From a Christian perspective, without God there is nothing. Scripture tells us that God continually sustains everything. Without God's sustaining power, all creation would cease. Colossians 1:15-17 (ESV) 15  He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation. 16  For by him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, ...


4

Wow, this is an excellent question. In essence, there are some things that are unethical from the viewpoints of some societies that are not immoral. Polygamy and slavery are two examples of this. However, anything that is immoral is, by definition, a sin. Definitions There are two approaches I can see to answering this question. And these two ...


4

Judging God to be fair is akin to judging God to be good. Fairness is one of the key attributes of goodness. If you believe God is good, it can only be because you have judged him so. Compare these two positions: "Joe is good, but I cannot judge him to be good." "Joe is evil, but I cannot judge him to be evil." Are they really even different? They both ...


4

Catholicism, for one, does not pander to notions of moral relativism, that there is no objective truth and good and evil can't be objectively established. We have no problem taking on hard questions like this, but the answer is a mystery that'll only leave you hanging. The active will of God is only going to do and has only done the highest good. ...


4

No, not EVERY sins affectS other people (directly, at least.). Lust, covetousness, idolatry are three examples of sins, neither of which affects anyone else, unless acted upon. All are sins, whether acted upon or not. Lust: Matthew 5:28 But I say unto you, That whosoever looketh on a woman to lust after her hath committed adultery with her ...



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