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Yes, several different Romans and Greek gods are mentioned. Artemis, Zeus, and Hermes are all Greek gods and Ashteroth was known as Astarte or Aphrodite to the Greeks. Artemis was also known to the Romans as Diana and Ashteroth was known to them as Venus. When they heard this they were enraged and were crying out, “Great is Artemis of the Ephesians!” ...


7

From the Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary: BAAL (Bāʹ ȧl) Lord of Canaanite religion and seen in the thunderstorms, Baal was worshiped as the god who provided fertility. He proved a great temptation for Israel. “Baal” occurs in the OT as a noun meaning “lord, owner, possessor, or husband,” as a proper noun referring to the supreme god of the ...


6

I'm sure much could be written about the specific meaning of the Hebrew word for gods, but let me focus on one important interpreter's take: Paul the apostle. In 1 Corinthians 8:4–6, he quotes Isaiah and Deuteronomy to make his case that eating food sacrificed to idols is not inherently wrong: Therefore, as to the eating of food offered to idols, we ...


2

LDS view: Short answer: Because he is male. Long answer: God the Father is male. Before I cite bible scriptures, let me point to the First Vision: Joseph Smith - History 1:17 17 It no sooner appeared than I found myself delivered from the enemy which held me bound. When the light rested upon me I saw two Personages, whose brightness and glory ...


2

In 1 Corinthians 10:19-20 (NIV), Paul writes: Do I mean then that a sacrifice offered to an idol is anything, or that an idol is anything? No, but the sacrifices of pagans are offered to demons, not to God, and I do not want you to be participants with demons. This indicates that all idol worship is actually worship of demons (fallen angels). 2 Kings ...



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