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11

Entertainment is one way we relax, and the Bible does tell us to rest, in many places, including Exodus 20:8: "Remember the Sabbath." Entertainment can also be a community-building event, although not as much so in the context of "self-entertainment," that you mentioned. I would also say that many things are not purely entertaining, but also educational or ...


7

Let me answer a few of your side-concerns before I get to your main question. Reformed theology stresses that God created the universe for one purpose: to glorify him fully I'm not certain how you're using the phrase "glorify him fully", but it could be interpreted to mean that God felt that he wasn't being glorified enough prior to creation, and ...


6

While most entertainment may not glorify God in itself, you can use that entertainment to glorify God. I am reminded a story of someone who had a teenage daughter when 90210 was on. Instead of her watching it on her own or just with her friends, he would watch it with them and interject comments throughout instilling his Christian values. (Apparently he ...


6

Short answer: We don't know. Speculation: Yes, Satan saw the Glory of God but not necessarily the face of God. There are two famous verses believed to describe the history of Satan; Isaiah 14:12-15 and Ezekiel 28:12-18. Ezekiel described him as a Cherub. Isaiah called him "Morning Star". According to Wikipedia Seraphim are the closest to God and of the ...


5

John Piper, the leading proponent of Christian Hedonism, often uses a slogan based on The Westminster Catchecism. He modifies the catcehism's stock answer that the chief end of man "is to glorify God" by restating it as: God is most glorified, when we are most satisfied, in Him Put another way, because God designed us to glorify Him, and because he is ...


5

Charles Hodge provides a simple argument in his Systematic Theology (1.5.13.B). He begins on the same ground as stated in the question: that the glory of God is the ultimate purpose for everything. This, he says, implies that God manifesting himself is the "highest conceivable, or possible good," and that it is the ultimate purpose of creation, providence, ...


4

Our knowledge of His manifest glory is incomplete as much as His glory is infinite. So from God's perspective He is not changing. From Our perspective we are becoming one with Him and so it is increasing In 2 Corinthians we read: But we all, with open face beholding as in a glass the glory of the Lord, are changed into the same image from glory to ...


3

The Fall indeed glorifies God The reformer that spent the most effort in making his thoughts fully known about this subject is Jonathan Edwards. He wrote two famous books on the topic: Dissertation on the End for Which God Created the World, popularized in modern times by John Piper's edition, God's Passion for His Glory Dissertation Concerning the Nature ...


3

In the context of the scripture that you have presented it would be good to go to the prior chapter where he refers to the hour that God would glorify his name (Jn. 12:23,28). Particularly in verse 28, “...Then a voice came from heaven, saying, “I have glorified it and will glorify it again.” It doesn’t suggest that this glory increased, but that it ...


2

All reformed theology adheres to is that the purpose for anything created is to 'glorify God' but that is obviously true under any theology that uses reason within its framework. God must have a reason for making something (beyond his single own existence) and the reason must be within himself (according to his own independent existence) before anything was ...


2

The reason freely choosing to accept the gift of Jesus would rob God of glory in Reformed theology is that it would soft pedal the nature of the fall. Calvinists understand that when mankind fell into sin it affected our entire person and nature, leaving no portion unaffected. This is not the same thing as saying that humanity is as bad as it could possibly ...


1

With my understanding of Calvinism/Reformed theology, the question here is confused on what the theology actually teaches. My understanding is that you are unconditionally selected for grace, however, once that grace is poured out on you, you freely and willingly surrender to it and follow God. I find this is a common misunderstanding. Common enough that ...


1

The Hebrew word for Glory - 'Kabod' means weightiness. In the Old Testament this was the Shekinah Glory that filled the temple visibly Exo_33:22 When my glory passes by, I will put you in a cleft in the rock and will cover you with my hand while I pass by. Deu_5:24 You said, "The LORD our God has shown us his great glory and we have heard him speak from ...


1

In its Semitic background, glory developed from the more concrete notion to the more abstract in the course of use in the Old Testament. Bernard Ramm, in one of the few systematic studies of glory in the Bible, outlines the development. He begins with the material and radical meaning of the Hebrew word kabod: Whatever possessed weight in the sense of ...


1

The ISBE () International Standard Bible Encyclopedia has a good article on the several words translated as "glory" in English Bibles. It is available online at: http://www.bible-history.com/isbe/G/GLORY/ To have glory is to be of great value and importance. Words implying glory are often figures of speech, with "emphasis ... [on] some external physical ...


1

Have you ever used Strong's Concordance with Hebrew and Greek? I often come here with questions on the meanings of words. Paul said that man is the image and glory of God, and that woman is the glory of the man; also that the man is not without the woman, neither the woman without the man in the Lord. -- Man as we know was created first. Jehovah was asked ...



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