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Although I am not comfortable thinking of the account of God's creation of Eve as being in any way allegorical or mythical, I do, however, think of the account as a kind of artistic and symbolic version of what actually transpired when God created another human being--a female human being--in His image who would complement the male of the species whom He had ...


4

God is more amazing than we will ever comprehend. We still don't know what all is a part of this planet we live on, and yet He was able to create it all just by speaking. (Genesis 1) He knew how to make everything work together to sustain life. He knew how to form us so that we could function the way we do. All the intricacies that "make us tick" that ...


-2

It doesn't really make sense to try to reconcile DNA and Genesis. The only way to combine them is to awkwardly shoehorn our understanding of DNA into the Genesis account, and simply say, God made the DNA to look different than Genesis says it should look. For example, Genesis 1 has land plants being made first, then water creatures and birds, then land ...


4

There are at least two possible answers to the question. Some Christians consider the stories in Genesis to be allegorical, describing what God did in language and concepts that the original audience would understand. Since the original audience was neither aware of DNA, or mitochondria, this would have been a detail that obscured the message. Those who ...


0

This What is the Authoritative Catholic Explanation of why the Magi get a pass, yet Catholics are to reject Astrology?, seems to be related to this question. God Has Spoken by His Son Hebrews 1:1-4 (RSVCE) 1 In many and various ways God spoke of old to our fathers by the prophets; 2 but in these last days he has spoken to us by a Son, whom he ...


0

I believe that all the suggestions for the 3 different types of period of time are possible. A day in the Lord is different to the day of man being a thousand years in our time. If a reference to God doing something would more likely relate to his time than to mans meaning a thousand years. When Adam was naming the animals would be in the lords time as the ...


-1

Just because there was no death does not mean that eating was not necessary for the physical body. If food was plentiful, and there was no disease that would prevent one from obtaining the necessary nutrients from food, then there would be no death from hunger, even if food was required for sustaining physical life. Therefore, your premises (Adam and Eve ...


5

St. Thomas Aquinas addresses this in the Summa Theologica question "Whether in the state of innocence man had need of food?" (I q. 97 a. 3). His response is: In the state of innocence man had an animal life requiring food; but after the resurrection he will have a spiritual life needing no food. In order to make this clear, we must observe that the ...


0

God didn't tell them they had to eat food, he told them food was available and that it was for them. Genesis 1:29-31 ESV And God said, “Behold, I have given you every plant yielding seed that is on the face of all the earth, and every tree with seed in its fruit. You shall have them for food. And to every beast of the earth and to every bird of the ...


5

There are really only two opinions on this and they stem from differing definitions of the word immortal which often conflates or coincides with opinions on the nature of the afterlife. Traditionally, immortal meant that you simply did not age, and therefore would not die from old age. This is often extended to illness as well. Your body still had ...


2

A Literalist interpretation of Genesis would agree that there would have been no 'need' to eat prior to the fall, but that doing so would have been pleasurable and would have enabled Adam and Eve to more fully experience the sense of: And God saw everything that he had made, and behold, it was very good. - Genesis 1:31a ESV I believe C.S. Lewis may ...


1

Probably the most well known light sign in the sky was the announcement of the birth of Jesus: All Scripture is quoted from the King James version unless otherwise stated. Matthew 2:1 and 2 Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judaea in the days of Herod the king, behold, there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem, Saying, Where is he that is ...


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I might start by questioning whether "signs" means what you seem to think it means, or whether it's an artifact of the translation—something that might be better hashed out on BH (I couldn't find any reference to it there). I'm just noting that different translations give for this passage various equivalents; for example: "let them be for signs and ...


0

The ancients, not knowing anything about astrophysics and related information, took note of their surroundings, including the stars/planets (I don't know if they differentiated between them). For example, if there were a supernova that were dramatically visible from Earth, people would instantly understand it, being very unusual, as a sign in a similar way ...


0

Realizing that our understanding is limited by the written Word, we all agree that our perfect God cannot create anything that is bad. Logically, the very fact that Eve had the reasoning capacity to make a choice between God's firm commandment and Satan's beguiling ... in my opinion indicates that she was, in fact, created with free will. And Adam chose to ...


3

There is a definite difference between trying to foretell an unknown future and seeing things unfold and knowing what's going on. I don't have to be a meteorologist to know that when dark clouds start gathering overhead there's a chance it might rain. A good representation of this is in Revelation: "I watched as he opened the sixth seal. There was a great ...


1

In her account of the Fall in THE LIFE OF JESUS CHRIST AND BIBLICAL REVELATIONS, Bl. Anne Catherine Emmerich (1774-1824) describes the serpent as follows: Among the animals was one that followed Eve more closely than the others. It was a singularly gentle and win- ning, though artful creature. I know of none other to which I might compare it. It ...


7

The first verse that comes to my mind is in Genesis 18:12- Therefore Sarah laughed within herself, saying, After I am waxed old shall I have pleasure, my lord being old also? This is the only verse I can really remember in this context, and it is probably what Peter is referring to.


2

There are two separate accounts of creation in the book of Genesis. The first, which occupies the first chapter, describes the creation of the world, life, and humanity in the "7 Day" format. On the 6th day, God creates mankind, both male and female. In the second creation story which starts at Genesis 2:2 recounts the familiar story of Adam (a name which ...


8

The Church of England has not taken a stand on the simplified 'creation versus evolution' debate. Many people investigating this have reported being unable to find a clear positional statement from the CofE, and there are quotes from church leaders stating that they believe there is no official position. This is an example. The church has made pronouncements ...


-1

A good friend of mine who belongs to the Church of England (as a minister) explained it to me in the following way: The Genesis narrative is considered for the most part literal, but the representation of days is metaphorical. This comes from both a Judaic teaching that these days represented ages as well as 2 Peter 3:8: But, beloved, be not ignorant of ...


2

I think it is clear enough from the text in Genesis 1 that Adam and Eve were created on the sixth day. On the fifth day God created the fishes and birds, and On the sixth day God created wild animals and Adam and Eve. Let me post the whole passage for clarification with my own emphasis. Notice that between the "fifth day" and the "sixth day", there is the ...


3

The basis for the belief that Eve was created on the 6th day is a literal interpretation of Genesis 1. Genesis 1:26-28 ESV Then God said, “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness. And let them have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the heavens and over the livestock and over all the earth and over every creeping thing ...


4

The answer to this question is similar to the answer I gave for your other question. We read in Genesis 1:27-31 that God created man (as a race) and created both male and female. Jump ahead to Genesis 2:18-25 we see the detailed creation of Eve (and prior to that, Adam). These events both take place on the same day, the sixth, which is supported by ...


1

The Jewish Book of Jubilees has the following verse, which I feel answers your question: And in the twenty−fifth jubilee Noah took to himself a wife, and her name was Emzara, the daughter of Rake'el, the daughter of his father's brother, in the first year in the fifth week and in the third year thereof she bare him Shem, in the fifth year thereof ...


10

Neither Roman Catholics nor just about any other Christian denominations believes that the Bible contains every detail possible. As John writes, These things are written that you might know that Jesus is the Christ. Just about every accepted theory of inspiration suggests that the Bible that the words we have are "sufficient" (and that is the ...


4

An answer for the original question "How do Theologians explain that there is no name for Noah's wife." Jewish theologians explain it this way: The identification of Na'amah, a descendant of Cain, as the wife of Noah, solves the structural flaw in Genesis as well as the above mentioned theological problem. The family of Cain is described at length in order ...



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