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36

While I have very strong beliefs on this subject, I cannot dogmatically say that if you believe evolution you cannot be truly saved. I am convinced that if you discount God's own eye-witness account of what He did during creation that you're greatly undermining your faith, but while it is an important truth to comprehend, I do not believe it is vital to ...


36

The story of Judah and Tamar is an interesting one, to say the least. Judah and Tamar are both explicitly mentioned in Jesus' lineage (Matthew 1 - and Tamar is only one of four women mentioned, all of whom have sordid stories associated with them). In the end, Tamar is going to trick her father-in-law into getting her pregnant, and then avoids death by ...


35

Existing in a perfect state did not deprive Adam and Eve of Free Will. Genesis 3:4-5 tells us that the serpent firstly modified God's Word by promising Eve that by taking of the forbidden fruit she would not surely die. Second, he enticed her with the promise of knowledge (knowing good and evil). Genesis 3:4-5 (KJV) And the serpent said unto the woman, ...


28

Short answer: Yes. Longer answer: A theology that requires the early chapters of Genesis to be understood as a literal and historical narrative is not compatible with evolution; however, even in ancient times the first chapters of Genesis were often understood symbolically. The 2nd century apologist Irenaeus understood the six days of Genesis as six ...


27

As science suggests, the physical universe of time, space, and matter is not eternal. It had a beginning. Thus it was created. It was not arranged or mixed or reassembled, but created out of nothing. Genesis 1 repeatedly uses the phrase, "God said, 'Let there be...', and there was...". God spoke, and what previously did not exist began to exist. So, ...


24

The issue is not that OECs have a "weak faith," but we believe we are taking a more appropriate view of the scripture. Indeed, if the text is written metaphorically (as we believe), then reading it literally is the weaker position. If you don't want to read my rather long (yet still way too short to pay true justice to this topic) answer, I suggest jumping ...


24

There is a third option - The prohibition on incest didn't come about until the covenant in Leviticus & Deuteronomy, and to accuse Cain, Abel, and Seth of incest is to accuse them ex post facto. As an aside, a Young Earth Creationist would date the Creation to 4004 BC, and the Exodus (and hence the Covenant) to about 1440BC. As such, you would be ...


23

Gen 6:20 reads as follows in the KJV: Of fowls after their kind, and of cattle after their kind, of every creeping thing of the earth after his kind, two of every sort shall come unto thee, to keep them alive. (emphasis added) The sense here is that the animals came to Noah, not that Noah went out and got each animal. I'm not sure that if I were a ...


22

First of all I live in the Middle East in the same country as Mt. Ararat where the ark landed. Note this is not in Palestine nor do we know where Noah started from. The problem could just as well have been that he was starting from the Siberian tundra and needed some African wildebeests. You're trying to solve a specific problem that you don't have enough ...


21

He created such complexity because it exists in Him as well, as we are explicitly created after His own image and in His likeness, as His children. Genesis 1:27 (KJV) 27 So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them. As for medical problems, those are inherently bound up with death and ...


21

The accuracy of the chronologies in Genesis 5 and 11 has been greatly debated. People have proposed various means of adjusting the figures to more realistic values, on the assumption that there has been some textual error. (This is partly motivated by differences between the Masoretic Text and the Septuagint, suggesting some confusion on the part of ...


21

Nobody in ancient times could have imagined that the earth was billions of years old, so you won't see any explicit attempts to reconcile the Genesis creation stories with an old earth. However, the early Christians did see discrepancies that made them question how literally the creation stories should be understood. Second century Christian apologist ...


18

I realize that what I'm about to put forward is not conclusively proven, but it is possible. It's specifically answering from the perspective of young-earth creationists, which isn't the only view out there. (But it is the one you specified you wanted in your question.) Noah didn't have to save the fish. Your question makes two assumptions that seem ...


17

The short answer is "To teach Jacob an important lesson." This all takes place, of course, in Genesis 32. First, to your first question: Jacob wasn't "good" by any means. If you look at Jacob before this, he has stolen the blessing that was Esau's birthright. (Genesis 27). He had several children with women he didn't love, and was certainly no great ...


17

Per Genesis 2: 10 A river watering the garden flowed from Eden; from there it was separated into four headwaters. 11 The name of the first is the Pishon; it winds through the entire land of Havilah, where there is gold. 12 (The gold of that land is good; aromatic resin[d] and onyx are also there.) 13 The name of the second river is the Gihon; it winds ...


17

When Adam and Eve sinned in the garden, God gave them skins to cover up with (Genesis 3:21). To get those skins, some animal had to die. In other words, God sacrificed an animal to cover their sin1. From the beginning, God has declared the payment for sin is death, and so blood must be shed to cover sin: Leviticus 17:11: “For the life of a creature is in ...


16

The problem was not with the building, but with the intent of the builders, as shown in verse 4: They said, "Come, let us build for ourselves a city, and a tower whose top will reach into heaven, and let us make for ourselves a name, otherwise we will be scattered abroad over the face of the whole earth." This is in direct opposition to what God had ...


16

Answers in Genesis writes about this topic a lot. Their primary arguments are: The Genesis narrative seems to be written as a historical one, and not allegorical. Adam and Eve are treated as historical figures, having offspring, a genealogy, and death. Thus treating it otherwise would be poor hermeneutics. The Genesis account of the order of things ...


15

Let's look more closely at your linked verses: 5 God called the light “day,” and the darkness he called “night.” And there was evening, and there was morning—the first day. (Genesis 1:5) This verse implies the creation of light and the implementation of it to create the first day. Darkness already existed, so only light was needed. 16 God made two ...


15

I believe that your question is very closely related to the one of "How could an omnipotent God who hates sin allow sin? If He's omnipotent, couldn't He have prevented us from sinning?" The answer to that, of course, is that God gave us free will because He loves us, and because He wants to be loved in return. Our love for Him wouldn't be real love if it ...


15

Jesus did not make an explicit statement on the matter, but he did seem to take Genesis as true and historical in some sense. Consider Jesus's words in Mark 10:6ff on divorce: "But from the beginning of creation, ‘God made them male and female.’ ‘Therefore a man shall leave his father and mother and hold fast to his wife, and the two shall become one ...


14

Quite frankly, there are several viewpoints on this. There is no one answer to your question. Some Christians see evolution as a complete non-issue (but you asked specifically about creationists, so this group is outside of the scope of our desired answer). Some hold what are sometimes called "compromise positions" by young-earth creationists, such as the ...


14

The Bible actually indicates that Adam and Eve did, in fact, have daughters. This is the book of the generations of Adam. When God created man, he made him in the likeness of God. 2 Male and female he created them, and he blessed them and named them Man when they were created. 3 When Adam had lived 130 years, he fathered a son in his own likeness, ...


14

Noah was command to take every animal that walks on the face of the earth - not those that "swim in the deep." From Genesis 6:19 - 20, via the Amplified Bible. And of every living thing of all flesh [found on land], you shall bring two of every sort into the ark, to keep them alive with you; they shall be male and female. Of fowls and birds according ...


14

God created the heavens and the earth as an expression of His glory. The heavens are telling of the glory of God; And their expanse is declaring the work of His hands. (Psalms 19:1 NASB) and The heavens declare His righteousness, And all the peoples have seen His glory. (Psalms 97:6 NASB) I think John Piper explains it nicely in Desiring ...


14

Traditionally, many liberal theologians (e.g. Walter Bruggeman) have separated Genesis into two parts - Genesis 1 - 11 and Genesis 12 - 50. The dividing point begins with Abraham, and the tone of Genesis does change significantly at that point. In the first 11 chapters, Adam through Noah and Babel represent nearly 2000 years of human history. A broad ...


13

The death promised and that Adam experienced the moment he chose to sin was not a ceasing to exist or a physical stopping to breathe, it was a separation: a rending apart of two things that were once closely joined. On the day that Adam ate the fruit, he died1. He was separated from God. The fellowship between them was broken. The reverse of this death ...


13

An ark isn't a boat - it is a place of refuge - a container that protects things. Jews place their Torahs in an "ark" - a special box made to preserve the contents. The ark of the covenant was a box that protected and preserved the 10 commandments, Aarons rod, and an omer of manna. More importantly, despite the fact that when you say "ark" most people ...


13

It's rather ironic — the thrust of your question is "Why did God wait so long?" Andrew Lloyd Webber asks the exact opposite question — "Why come so early?" As Judas sings in the finale: Every time I look at you I don't understand Why you let the things you did Get so out of hand You'd have managed better If you'd had it planned Now why'd you ...


12

In many ancient cultures, Hebrew included, the number seven often signifies completeness and/or perfection (for more information see either Numerical Sayings in the OT, W. Roth or IVP New Bible Dictionary, ed. Marshall, Miller, Packer, Wiseman, p834). Therefore, it is often used in an emphatic sense. This is seen in Peter's question: "should I forgive seven ...



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