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72

You certainly can, and some percentage of believers do believe in some form of (usually theistic) evolution in an effort to reconcile the findings of science with the revelation of God in his word. The essential breakdown for creation systems is (with lots of co-mingling and blurring): Naturalism: Old universe with evolution and no God at all, for which ...


39

The story of Judah and Tamar is an interesting one, to say the least. Judah and Tamar are both explicitly mentioned in Jesus' lineage (Matthew 1 - and Tamar is only one of four women mentioned, all of whom have sordid stories associated with them). In the end, Tamar is going to trick her father-in-law into getting her pregnant, and then avoids death by ...


36

While I have very strong beliefs on this subject, I cannot dogmatically say that if you believe evolution you cannot be truly saved. I am convinced that if you discount God's own eye-witness account of what He did during creation that you're greatly undermining your faith, but while it is an important truth to comprehend, I do not believe it is vital to ...


30

There are three primary views that explain the meaning of the word "day" in Genesis 1. I will describe each one, and some of the purported Biblical evidence supporting each, briefly here. After all, this is a topic on which many books have been written. 24-hour Day Theory This view, which is held by many Young Earth Creationists states that each of the 6 ...


28

Short answer: Yes. Longer answer: A theology that requires the early chapters of Genesis to be understood as a literal and historical narrative is not compatible with evolution; however, even in ancient times the first chapters of Genesis were often understood symbolically. The 2nd century apologist Irenaeus understood the six days of Genesis as six ...


28

As science suggests, the physical universe of time, space, and matter is not eternal. It had a beginning. Thus it was created. It was not arranged or mixed or reassembled, but created out of nothing. Genesis 1 repeatedly uses the phrase, "God said, 'Let there be...', and there was...". God spoke, and what previously did not exist began to exist. So, ...


25

There is a third option - The prohibition on incest didn't come about until the covenant in Leviticus & Deuteronomy, and to accuse Cain, Abel, and Seth of incest is to accuse them ex post facto. As an aside, a Young Earth Creationist would date the Creation to 4004 BC, and the Exodus (and hence the Covenant) to about 1440BC. As such, you would be ...


24

The issue is not that OECs have a "weak faith," but we believe we are taking a more appropriate view of the scripture. Indeed, if the text is written metaphorically (as we believe), then reading it literally is the weaker position. If you don't want to read my rather long (yet still way too short to pay true justice to this topic) answer, I suggest jumping ...


23

First of all I live in the Middle East in the same country as Mt. Ararat where the ark landed. Note this is not in Palestine nor do we know where Noah started from. The problem could just as well have been that he was starting from the Siberian tundra and needed some African wildebeests. You're trying to solve a specific problem that you don't have enough ...


23

Gen 6:20 reads as follows in the KJV: Of fowls after their kind, and of cattle after their kind, of every creeping thing of the earth after his kind, two of every sort shall come unto thee, to keep them alive. (emphasis added) The sense here is that the animals came to Noah, not that Noah went out and got each animal. I'm not sure that if I were a ...


23

The accuracy of the chronologies in Genesis 5 and 11 has been greatly debated. People have proposed various means of adjusting the figures to more realistic values, on the assumption that there has been some textual error. (This is partly motivated by differences between the Masoretic Text and the Septuagint, suggesting some confusion on the part of ...


22

There are a number of different theories as to the meaning of Genesis 6:3: 120 years to the flood One common interpretation is that it's not talking about lifespan, but the amount of time humanity has to repent before the coming of the Flood.1,2 Aside: Genesis 7:6 tells us that Noah was 600 years old when the flood came, placing the flood 1656 years after ...


22

The Nephilim are a subject of much debate. There are a number of views on what they were, the two prominent views being the Sethite view and the Angelic view. Both are an opinion on who or what the "sons of God" are. The Nephelim are most notably mentioned in Genesis and seem to be a driving decision to send the Flood of Noah. The Nephilim were on the ...


21

He created such complexity because it exists in Him as well, as we are explicitly created after His own image and in His likeness, as His children. Genesis 1:27 (KJV) 27 So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them. As for medical problems, those are inherently bound up with death and ...


21

The short answer is "To teach Jacob an important lesson." This all takes place, of course, in Genesis 32. First, to your first question: Jacob wasn't "good" by any means. If you look at Jacob before this, he has stolen the blessing that was Esau's birthright. (Genesis 27). He had several children with women he didn't love, and was certainly no great ...


19

I realize that what I'm about to put forward is not conclusively proven, but it is possible. It's specifically answering from the perspective of young-earth creationists, which isn't the only view out there. (But it is the one you specified you wanted in your question.) Noah didn't have to save the fish. Your question makes two assumptions that seem ...


19

Traditionally, many liberal theologians (e.g. Walter Bruggeman) have separated Genesis into two parts - Genesis 1 - 11 and Genesis 12 - 50. The dividing point begins with Abraham, and the tone of Genesis does change significantly at that point. In the first 11 chapters, Adam through Noah and Babel represent nearly 2000 years of human history. A broad ...


18

Let's look more closely at your linked verses: 5 God called the light “day,” and the darkness he called “night.” And there was evening, and there was morning—the first day. (Genesis 1:5) This verse implies the creation of light and the implementation of it to create the first day. Darkness already existed, so only light was needed. 16 God made two ...


18

No. Enoch sinned just like the rest of us. He was taken to heaven because Christ's righteousness was imputed to him, just like it is imputed to us. Christ's death and resurrection saved all believers past and present, there is no need for any other explanation of righteousness.


18

I believe that your question is very closely related to the one of "How could an omnipotent God who hates sin allow sin? If He's omnipotent, couldn't He have prevented us from sinning?" The answer to that, of course, is that God gave us free will because He loves us, and because He wants to be loved in return. Our love for Him wouldn't be real love if it ...


18

Per Genesis 2: 10 A river watering the garden flowed from Eden; from there it was separated into four headwaters. 11 The name of the first is the Pishon; it winds through the entire land of Havilah, where there is gold. 12 (The gold of that land is good; aromatic resin[d] and onyx are also there.) 13 The name of the second river is the Gihon; it winds ...


17

The death promised and that Adam experienced the moment he chose to sin was not a ceasing to exist or a physical stopping to breathe, it was a separation: a rending apart of two things that were once closely joined. On the day that Adam ate the fruit, he died1. He was separated from God. The fellowship between them was broken. The reverse of this death ...


17

Answers in Genesis writes about this topic a lot. Their primary arguments are: The Genesis narrative seems to be written as a historical one, and not allegorical. Adam and Eve are treated as historical figures, having offspring, a genealogy, and death. Thus treating it otherwise would be poor hermeneutics. The Genesis account of the order of things ...


17

When Adam and Eve sinned in the garden, God gave them skins to cover up with (Genesis 3:21). To get those skins, some animal had to die. In other words, God sacrificed an animal to cover their sin1. From the beginning, God has declared the payment for sin is death, and so blood must be shed to cover sin: Leviticus 17:11: “For the life of a creature is in ...


17

Names were considered to be meaningful in some way. For example, the younger of Isaac's twin sons with Rebekah was named Jacob ("supplanter") because when he was born he was holding on to Esau's heel, as if attempting to overtake him. (Genesis 25: 24-26) After Jacob's wrestle with the angel, when he demanded a blessing from the Lord, the angel pronounced ...


17

The answer to the question regarding the first book of the Bible actually comes from the last book of the Bible: And the great dragon was thrown down, the serpent of old who is called the devil and Satan, who deceives the whole world; he was thrown down to the earth, and his angels were thrown down with him. Revelation 12:9 NASB And he laid hold of ...


16

The problem was not with the building, but with the intent of the builders, as shown in verse 4: They said, "Come, let us build for ourselves a city, and a tower whose top will reach into heaven, and let us make for ourselves a name, otherwise we will be scattered abroad over the face of the whole earth." This is in direct opposition to what God had ...


15

Does the Bible tell us anything about how the animals acted on the Ark? No, it doesn't. Any other answer here would be purely speculation.


15

God created the heavens and the earth as an expression of His glory. The heavens are telling of the glory of God; And their expanse is declaring the work of His hands. (Psalms 19:1 NASB) and The heavens declare His righteousness, And all the peoples have seen His glory. (Psalms 97:6 NASB) I think John Piper explains it nicely in Desiring ...


15

Jesus did not make an explicit statement on the matter, but he did seem to take Genesis as true and historical in some sense. Consider Jesus's words in Mark 10:6ff on divorce: "But from the beginning of creation, ‘God made them male and female.’ ‘Therefore a man shall leave his father and mother and hold fast to his wife, and the two shall become one ...



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