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20

First of all, Joseph was not Jesus biological father in any understanding since Mary conceived by a miraculous intervention of the Holy Spirit before she was joined to Joseph and the text tells us they refrained from intercourse until after Jesus birth. However in the eyes of the law of the time, Joseph was the father. More than just a legal guardian, by ...


15

Traditionally, many liberal theologians (e.g. Walter Bruggeman) have separated Genesis into two parts - Genesis 1 - 11 and Genesis 12 - 50. The dividing point begins with Abraham, and the tone of Genesis does change significantly at that point. In the first 11 chapters, Adam through Noah and Babel represent nearly 2000 years of human history. A broad ...


10

In many cultures, genealogy roots a person in who they are. By saying, "so and so is the son of so and so," you are establishing an identity. As the old saying goes, "we don't want nobody nobody sent." In the specific case of Genesis 5 & 10 (sometimes called "the Table of Nations"), however, there is a very interesting theological point being made. ...


10

The genealogy in the gospel of Matthew is definitely the genealogy of Joseph, and the genealogy in Luke's Gospel is most likely that of Mary. This coincides with the primary audiences of the two books (Mathew the Jews, and Luke the Gentiles). Mathew would want to show according to Jewish tradition that Jesus was both a Jew and a Son of David. Luke was trying ...


9

This is a great question. The Bible never provides a direct rationale for the seemingly long ages recorded in the Old Testament. It just states them as a matter of fact with no apology for them. As we look more closely at the ages, though, we find some very interesting things. The ages fall quite dramatically at a very definite point in biblical history ...


8

The focus of this invective isn't so much on the genealogies themselves as it is the way in which people use them to puff them themselves up. Even barring earthly lineages, the poor of the church of Corinth managed to put themselves into faction. In 1 Corinthians 3, Paul writes: Brothers and sisters, I could not address you as people who live by the ...


8

The books of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John can be seen to present Christ as King, Servant, Man, and God (in that order). See E.W. Bullinger's wonderful book Number in Scriptures for more on this topic (the chapter on the number seven). As Bullinger puts it, a king must have a genealogy, and a man should have one. You'll notice that Matthew's genealogy starts ...


5

Many people believe that there are gaps in the Genealogy listed in Matthew. This article addresses "the primary problems of the Genealogy in Matthew", and lists the gaps as one of the arguments for "unreliability" leveled by critics. Section I: What Are The Primary Problems Associated With Matthew’s Genealogy And How Are They Reconciled? There ...


5

Your answer seems correct. As God has never approved of being unequally yoked. Cain's descendants followed after Cain and dwelt in his city (Gen 4:17). God never wanted people to live clustered in cities, where sin would abound, and there are various examples of this throughout Genesis. God's people stayed in the wilderness, tilling the ground and doing the ...


4

I don't think we can ever know for sure as we can't ask them. However I think the answer is probably to do with who they are writing to and what is the purpose of their writing. Matthew is probably writing to a Jewish audience. For them the Christ has to have come from Abraham & David and so Matthew spends the time to show that Jesus has the credentials ...


4

Matthew and Luke had different purposes for their genealogies. Matthew wrote his gospel to present Jesus as King of the Jews. Therefore, his genealogy traces Jesus' descent from Abraham (father of the Hebrew nation) through the royal line of David and Solomon. Luke presented Jesus as the Son of Man and showed his descent from Adam (the first man). The ...


3

I'm not Catholic, but the Catholic Encyclopedia does a good job of outlining the importance of the genealogies here. There are several purposes for including the genealogies in Scripture, some theological, some merely cultural. On the cultural side: The Hebrews shared the predilection for genealogies which prevailed among all the Semitic races. Among ...


3

Even if Theistic Evolution does require rejection of the creation account as literal, this does not require either that the Flood be fictional (many ancient civilizations record a great flood event), nor that Adam be fictitious. Whether one is a literal-creationist or a Theistic Evolutionist, there must be a legitimate First Man in the genealogy. If ...


3

The Messiah and Joseph's genealogy? Both Matthew and Luke record the genealogy of Yeshua from different perspectives. Matthew's gospel gives us the legal lineage of Yeshua, while Luke gives us the bloodline. Matthew's focus is on Yeshua the son of David, the son of Abraham; thus the lineage of Yeshua in Matthew's gospel runs forward from Abraham, ...


3

Whether or not Cain has any DNA remaining in any or all of the humans now existant on earth, it can be unequivocally stated that Cain has no "descendants." A descendant - at least in a legal sense - implies legitimacy to which the Bible itself does not lend credence. Abraham, for example, is technically the ancestor of Ishmael, but after he was kicked out, ...


2

Joseph's lineage descended from Solomon according to the following passage: Matthew 1:6-7 (NASB) 6 Jesse was the father of David the king. David was the father of Solomon by Bathsheba who had been the wife of Uriah. 7 Solomon was the father of Rehoboam, Rehoboam the father of Abijah, and Abijah the father of Asa. Joseph was also descended from a ...


2

Dittos to Narnian's answer, I won't repeat his material, but let me add some further thoughts: I've heard theories that the word translated "year" in our Bibles is really referring to some much shorter unit of time. One writer suggested it should be translated "month", so the ages of 800 and 900 years become 800 and 900 months, or 70 or 80 years, and thus ...


2

Adam was created to live forever. However, Because of the fall, he had to die. He also forfeited his right to eternal life. The genetics of Adam were such that generations following would benefit exponentially, until the influence would be depleted. Thus, succeeding generations lived shorter periods of time. ...


2

There is nothing symbolic about those old ages they are there to remind us of just how continuing to sin sorrows God: All Scripture is quoted from the King James translation. Gen 6:1 through 6 And it came to pass, when men began to multiply on the face of the earth, and daughters were born unto them, that the sons of God saw the daughters of men that ...


2

To me, it sounds like a recounting of early civilization: domestication of animals, music, metallurgy, city building. A secular anthropologist would tell a story of hominids evolving over millions of years culminating with emergence of homo sapiens in Africa. Then the story shifts into high gear as humans migrated all over the world and culture, technology ...


2

Noah's Lineage Noah was definitely a significant figure, as it was he and his family alone who survived the flood. The purpose appears to be to show Noah's lineage from Adam. Adding in brothers and sisters at each level would be a bit tangential to that purpose. Enoch was certainly a man of note due to his close relationship with God. The Line of Cain ...


2

It is possibly a reference to the gnostic emanations (genealogies of angels) but in this case it seems to do more with Jewish folklore. Timothy does not really seem to attack gnosticism as is done in an Epistle like Colossians. It certainly has nothing to do with he genealogical records of Christ, which were so very important and which were clear enough ...


1

Matthew The Gospel of Matthew appears to be written to Jews in order to present Jesus to them as the King of the Jews. As such, it was necessary to trace Jesus' lineage through Joseph, His adopted father, through the lineage of the kings back to David, whom God promised would have an heir who would reign forever. It was also important to trace His lineage ...


1

In most ancient cultures, the letters of the alphabet doubled as numbers. The best known example today is Roman numerals. The Hebrew alphabet had its own numeric encoding. The reason Matthew chose 14 is simple: 14 is the sum of the letters of David's name. Matthew is tracing Jesus' genealogy to show he is the heir of David; by dividing the genealogy into ...


1

No disagreement with AffableGeek. As you mention in your question, another value to these geneologies is to allow us to establish a chronology for Genesis. Historians such as James Ussher and Isaac Newton calculated dates of OT events, including creation, based on adding up these ages until we get to an event that we can connect to a modern calendar. ...


1

As already mentioned by @Affable Geek, the identity of a person is an important thing in biblical times. The importance of identity is also to be able to trace your history back to the promises of God. So for a Jew, it is important to trace your origins back to Abraham to show that you are a child of Abraham and therefore part of the promises that God made ...


1

Short answer: because both the right to be king (which Matthew traces) and the legal guardianship (which Luke traces) came through the father. Long answer: Matthew's genealogy is traced through the right to be king. A theme in Matthew is the kingship of Jesus. This starts in ch1, where Jesus is called the "son of David" (Mat 1:1) - Joseph is called the ...



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