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18

As noted in the question, these are layman's terms. However, I am providing links to more official definitions, which have been used as source material. Definition of the term "Inspired": The doctrine of the inspiration of the Bible means that the Bible in the original documents is God-breathed, that it is a divine product, and, because it is divine, the ...


16

My first answer wasn't very good; I want to take a different angle. I hope this approach helps make this issue more clear. TL;DR You don't have to stage a protest to be Protestant. It's a matter of heritage. Of fallacies and analogies... Your question commits some basic fallacies that can easily be addressed. cite an accurate historical reference ...


9

Evangelicals stem from fundamentalists, but have diverged since the 1950s. Theologically, they hold much in common, but primarily differ in their approach to dealing with society at large. It should be noted that neither is a "denomination" but rather a reforming trend that is cross-denominational, but bound by common purpose to reform the church, stripping ...


8

This is going to be a difficult, if not impossible question to answer to everyone's satisfaction for precisely the reason you say it should be defined. It's bandied about so much, not only by the press, but by just about everyone,that I doubt there is a universally accepted definition. There are, however, certain characteristics that could be listed that ...


8

There is a teaching that is very common in Baptist Churches that the Baptist Church has its origins in the New Testament Church, long before the Reformation. A fair representation of the teaching is found at Providence Baptist Ministries. A summary of the teaching consists of the following points: There have always, since the time of the New Testament ...


7

I believe you're confusing etymology with history. "Protestant" while it may have originally referred to a limited subset of non-Catholic Westerners (specifically, a very small group of Lutherans around the Diet of Speyer in 1529), now (generally) means "non-Catholic Christian" (Rome is not necessarily the definitive standard, however: "Protestant" or may ...


6

Hmm, I think Ignatius Theophorus has the most historically accurate answer, and yet as of my visit here he has the fewest votes. :-) Let me build on Ignatius. The term "Protestant" was coined when the Lutheran delegates to the Diet of Speyer protested against the pro-Catholic, anti-Lutheran decisions of that council. But from there the word "Protestant" ...


6

The modern Baptist denominations and adherents descend from the Anabaptist movement which was part of the 16th century Reformation. Several Baptist churches hold to similar creeds to the Nicene (or, more commonly in my experience, confessions of faith or faith statements). There are also hundreds of Baptist churches which call themselves "Reformed" (I grew ...


6

The idea behind the term "protestant" may have originated in those who literally protested the Catholic Church, but today it has a somewhat broader meaning. It has come to mean that a church believes that the Catholic Church lost its way, and that it is necessary to teach correct doctrine as described in the Bible, instead of Biblical doctrines mingled with ...


6

Disclaimer - I'm not saying that you have to be a fundamentalist to be a Christian. I'm simply explaining the Fundamentalist perspective on this issue. it's likely to offend someone. That's not my intent. Biblical Literalism, from a Fundamentalist perspective dies not mean hyper-literalism. Instead, we tend toward historical-grammatical method of ...


5

There's a belief among Baptists known as the "Trail of Blood," which traces Baptist beliefs back through the Anabaptists, Waldensians and various other groups all the way back to the pre-Nicene church. Take a look at "The Pilgrim Church" by E.H. Broadbent for more info on that. As far as I understand the claim, there's really no way to authenticate it one ...


5

"God is not controlled by laws of science" I don't know whether you can share this idea with me or not. The truth is, science cannot explain everything. Simple things like dreams, thoughts, feelings and emotions cannot be explained by science. Science can only understand the things that human can see, touch, feel and hear. I don't think the law of science as ...


4

It depends on the literalist. A Young Earth Creationist would directly challenge the scientific method used to define the speed of light and therefore the light year. Other literalists might shrug and say who can know the mind of God. (Romans 11:34) Also, when arguing the age of the universe old/young universe proponents often argue that it is a cumulative ...


4

Wikipedea gives an apt enough definition, but speaking as a fundamentalist, I'll put it in my own words. The defining characteristic of fundamentalists is that we hold fast to the fundamentals of the faith. Inerrancy of the Bible As a result of this point, we take the bible literally (usually including the genesis account of creation, and young-earth ...


4

The hardest part in this answer is to distinguish Evangelicals from Fundamentalists, who share the same doctrines, but a different culture. The Fundamentalist movement itself takes it's name from a set of books called "The Fundamentals," published in 1925 as a reaction to modern liberalism in church polity. It basically called for a return to literal ...


4

To answer all three questions at once: Holy men spake to scribes to write it down as they were moved by the Holy Ghost. 2 Pet 1:21. We have the Holy Spirit (God) spoken words of those Holy Men (Prophets), in complete form, properly translated, and without mistakes today. Longer Answer Inspired means that a scribe penned it as a prophet spoke what the ...


3

You might be a fundamentalist if … … you're mean. The term fundamentalist has a broader usage even beyond Christianity or even Theology in some circles. I've been hearing some people (tending towards the liberal end of the spectrum) trying to label Al Qaeda as Islamic fundamentalists. The not-so-transparent idea is that if terrorists are fundamentalists, ...


3

To take the Bible literally is to take the verses which are plain in meaning to you, with the aid of a dictionary if need be, and only those verses. It's extra-biblical teaching that is all the trouble, in my Fundamentalist opinion, not the figurative speech in the Bible. It's true that some scripture is hard to be understood, the scriptures even say that. ...


2

This is due to fundamentalist having acquired a notion for "a guy with all the right answers" amongst some groups. No one wants to be labelled as fraudulent. My personal belief is that the labeling is misapplied by the media, Churches, and individuals. I refer to the Dictionary: often capitalized : a movement in 20th century Protestantism emphasizing ...


1

Historically, Creationists when confronted with this issue have often subscribed to the "Apparent Age Theory". Al Mohler, for example is an advocate. Also called the "Omphalos Hypothesis," the idea is that when God created the universe, he did so in such a way as to make Creation appear to have a certain age. Thus, Adam had a belly button (even if he ...


1

I think because of Islamic terrorists being called 'fundamentalists' the term will eventually phase out among Christians, as fewer Christians will say 'I am a fundamentalists' as the media demonizes the term, more and more. The term probably has its original real meaning in the U.S. and that partially related to the conservative right in American politics. ...



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