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St Thomas Aquinas asks in Summa Theologica 3.1.3, "If man had not sinned, would God nevertheless have become incarnate?" (Latin: Si homo non peccasset, nihilominus Deus incarnatum fuisset?). His answer is "no", while acknowledging that God could have still chosen to become incarnate for other reasons; although he recognizes a diversity of thought on the ...


7

I'm not sure if the Church has an explicit doctrinal position on this question, but I can give you the view of classical philosophy, as originally expounded by Aristotle and then developed chiefly by St. Thomas Aquinas. This view undergirds the thinking of most orthodox Catholic theologians, historically speaking. In this way of thinking -- assuming you ...


5

Because some things cannot be accomplished by the application of power. Suppose I asked you to draw a 4-sided triangle. You would presumably reply that this is impossible, because a triangle by definition has only 3 sides. Suppose I then say, Well, what if you had 10 really strong men to help? Then could you do it? Of course the logical reply is that it ...


4

God did not create man with an evil nature, He created us as children, innocent and not knowing the good from evil, this knowledge was gained when Adam and Eve ate from the Tree of Knowledge. By partaking of the fruit, it allowed Adam and Eve to know what is good and bad, what is virtue and vise, and what is pleasure and pain, which is why, in Genesis 3 of ...


4

The doctrine of Prevenient Grace is seen by those who adhere to it as a natural outcome of sound Biblical exegesis. In one respect it's akin to the doctrine of the Trinity in that it resolves apparent discrepancies. With the Trinity, we have clear teachings in Scripture that there is only one God, other clear teachings that Jesus is God, and others ...


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The quote is from C.S.Lewis in "Mere christianity", book 4, chapter 3 "Time And Beyond Time".


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When you say: “when people get to heaven they are no longer capable of sinning” not all Christians would agree with this response. There is no evidence that any “free will” creature who has been reborn and experienced the wholeness of God’s love, would then rebel against that love. Can’t and won’t are two different things. Romans 4:16 Therefore it is ...


3

I am understanding your use of the word prevenient grace to be not only God's influence upon men before actual justification but also joined with the assumption that his intended influence upon men to draw them to salvation by the Holy Spirit can be rejected and is resistible. In this sense the grace you imagine is something opposed to Calvinism. To answer ...


3

You are not the first thoughtful person ever to have thought what you think about the "free will of man" and the sovereignty of God. (I put the free will of man in quotation marks, because I think it more accurate to say "man's ability to decide," or "man's ability to make decisions." The only will which is truly free belongs to God, and He alone is free to ...


3

I haven't personally read Alvin Plantinga, but I've read that he tried to answer question of "natural evil" in a very interesting way. See some short description here http://www.iep.utm.edu/evil-log/#H6 and more in his books: "The Nature of Necessary", "God, Freedom, and Evil". What I personally think is that there is a great problem of perception. I think ...


3

A friend of mine who has been reading a great deal of John Calvin's Institutes said something to me a couple months ago which has been resonating within me ever since. At this point (as of today, that is) I'm beginning to think that what my friend had to say--thanks, in part, to Calvin--is probably closer to the truth than what I believed previously. What ...


3

Here are some potentially relevant passages: Proverbs 16:9 (NASB) The mind of man plans his way, But the LORD directs his steps. Jeremiah 10:23 (NASB) I know, O LORD, that a man's way is not in himself, Nor is it in a man who walks to direct his steps. These two passages suggest than humans have the power of choice, though not the power to ...


3

I'm going to take the middle of the road and say that free will (or agency) is the ability to choose between good and evil; those who consistently choose the former will, in the end, be saved. Choosing, like you said, requires knowledge of good and evil options. It seems that different opinions on the meaning of agency stem from opinions of whether ...


3

The idea that God draws and offers salvation to all men, not only a chosen elect, comes from passages such as John 3:16-21 (emphasis mine (note that this passage can just as easily support a Calvinist view)) - “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. For God did not send ...


3

God did not create us with a sinful nature. God created Adam and Eve with freedom of choice, and put the tree of knowledge of good and evil in the garden to test their obedience and loyalty to Him. There had to be a choice in order to show true free will. His character had been put into question by Lucifer in the rebellion in heaven. So God gave them a ...


3

The exact meaning of "free will" is greatly contested, especially as it interacts with the sovereign power and foreknowledge of God. I understand your question as seeking evidence for early Christian thought, other than in the content of the Bible itself. In the early church, several authorities wrote on the topic, in support of human freedom, including the ...


2

ACC: In the Garden of Eden, God gave freedom of choice to Adam and Eve. This was His greatest gift to them, since they had been created. Until Adam ate of the tree of good and bad, he had no idea that he was separate from God, or that he could do something on his own (without God telling him to do it.) This idea comes from Midrash (3rd. cent. C.E.,) and was ...


2

I had to research this more before answering. I had never heard of the term before. Really what you are looking for then is "Do you believe that God draws us to him with Holy spirit?". I am no expert on the matter, but with my knowledge of the scriptures my answer is an emphatic yes! God is known to draw those who have qualities he desires. He opens their ...


2

This is an issue with the translation. See eg the NIV: Since an overseer manages God’s household, he must be blameless – not overbearing, not quick-tempered, not given to drunkenness, not violent, not pursuing dishonest gain. Furthermore, the word the KJV translates as selfwilled can mean: self-pleasing, self-willed, arrogant "Self-willed" would ...


1

There are some basics which you need to consider here; that change the whole precept of the question. All Scripture is quoted from the King James translation. God is omniscient! God knew from before he created the Angels; exactly how all things would unfold for Eternity. God is Omnipotent! God is all powerful, he has the power to ...


1

Some older puritan writers used to talk about a sinner being awakened (not saved, just awakened). This would involve conviction of sin. It is pertinent to the discussion on pre-venient grace (as in the question) as this was the term used by the Puritans for it. e.g. from John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress (emphasis mine): 'This miry Slough is such a place as ...


1

Read Luke 15:11-31. The younger son did not seek to leave because he was evil. He sought to leave because he had not yet learned to appreciate what he had on the farm. The father might have been able to physically prevent the younger son from leaving, but he could not have made the younger son happy on the farm. It was only after the younger son had ...


1

You raise a good question, and a profound one at that! I'm glad you acknowledge God created us in His image by giving us a free will. Some Christians believe that "free will" does not really exist. They reason if God is truly in control of His creation, if He is truly sovereign, then free will is simply an illusion. According to them, regardless of what ...


1

Firstly God's punishment is being held until the judgment due to the sacrifice and atonement of Jesus Christ. Secondly our free will is given to allow us to make our own choices so that God will know at the judgement bar who loved him and who did not as John 14:15 says "If ye love me, keep my commandments." Just because we can choose doesn't mean ...


1

Some of the old testament had to be written by word of mouth. the first 5 books of the old testament were written by Moses. Adam was created around 4000 B.C.E. Moses wrote Genesis in 1513 B.C.E. The other 4 books he was present for, but everything up to then he must have learned from word of mouth. Table of the Books of the Bible The problem with the whole ...



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