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28

This is a major point of Romans 6. After arguing that the coming of the law increased the number of trespasses, and that subsequently "grace abounded all the more," Paul warns those who might twist his words: 6:1 What shall we say then? Are we to continue in sin that grace may abound? 2 By no means! How can we who died to sin still live in it? 6:15 ...


25

Christ is using his ability to perform miracles as evidence that he is God, and therefore has the right and the ability to forgive sins. He is saying, anyone can say "Your sins are forgiven," without any evidence that they have the authority to do so. But only God can heal a paralytic. So by performing such a miracle, Christ is proving that he has the ...


20

The general belief, that I think applies to most Christians, is that Jesus' death and resurrection opens the gates of heaven, saving us from sin in general, but that we must still choose to actually enter through the gate -- to repent of our individual sins and desire to sin no more. To put it another way, Jesus' death makes repentance and forgiveness ...


16

Actually, it never worked. Hebrews 10:4 (ESV) For it is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to take away sins. All the OT sacrifices were useless in an of themselves. What they did all along was not actually solve something but point people to the idea that something needed to be solved and the way that had to happen was through sacrifice. ...


15

Protestants basically fall into three main camps, claiming that the unpardonable sin is: asserting, during Christ's life on earth, that his works were of the devil; or, refusal to repent even to the end of one's life; or, hatefully and willfully slandering the Holy Spirit's testimony of Christ. Within (3), there are three views regarding who can ...


14

You must take verses 5 and 6 together, as they're a single statement. Christ has just told the paralyzed man that his sins are forgiven, and the teachers around Him that saw it believed His statement of forgiveness was blasphemy as only God can forgive sins. They failed to recognize that Christ was God. So, He then makes a point of showing them that it's ...


12

Depends, are they a believer or an unbeliever? Unbeliever (Mark 11:25 ESV) "And whenever you stand praying, forgive, if you have anything against anyone, so that your Father also who is in heaven may forgive you your trespasses.” When you forgive an unbeliever you are acknowledging that they have wronged you but you will not try to seek justice yourself, ...


11

I've heard a variety of theories on this topic: He "knew" (or hoped) the crowd wouldn't accept them (they were asking for men, after all) Females were considered a sub-class of society, and therefore were his "possession" wherewith to do as he pleased It was the offer of a desperate man trying to save the guests whom he suspected of being more than just ...


9

Let's start with your question title. For the sake of argument let's turn it around and ask "Why would God not be allowed for forgive us?" The problem lies in God's idea of justice. We could spend a lot of time one this one, but let's keep it it simple: Isaiah 61:8 (ESV) For I the Lord love justice; I hate robbery and wrong [...] In order for Him to ...


8

Building on @warren's response: Yes, righteousness does not indicate that he was perfect. Additionally, crimes against humans by humans are particularly abhorrent to both humans and God. So why, then, would Lot be considered righteous? There are also a couple of other factors that may influence our understanding of this: Context. Peter is addressing a ...


8

I think you are forgetting the next line (1 Corinthians 6:11): And this is what some of you used to be. But you were washed, you were sanctified, you were justified in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and in the Spirit of our God. It seems to me that Paul is listing those sins as examples of evils that one may do to another; however, the emphasis ...


8

Mathew 18:21-22 This verse says we should forgive seven times seventy "Period!" It doesn't say we should forgive seven times seventy, -asterisk- except for non- believers. Christians are called to (Love) even our "Enemies!" Mathew 5:44 But i tell you, Love your enemies an pray for those who persecutes you. (NIV) I'm pretty sure that conveys forgiving ...


8

There are a few verses in Romans that might be what you're thinking of: Romans 3:8 ESV And why not do evil that good may come?—as some people slanderously charge us with saying. Their condemnation is just. Romans 6:1 ESV What shall we say then? Are we to continue in sin that grace may abound? Romans 6:15 ESV What then? Are we to sin because ...


8

Jude 4 says: "I say this because some ungodly people have wormed their way into your churches saying that God's marvelous grace allows us to live immoral lives. The condemnation of such people was recorded long ago, for they have denied our only Master and Lord Jesus Christ." New Living translation


7

Short answer: Yes, sorta. Long answer: Murder is a very serious sin, and while it can't be forgiven it can be pardoned. Also it will stop you from doing or holding certain church offices. See paragraph 4 of this article for more on why D&C 42 says it is unforgivable. Now to address your scripture reference. Book of Mormon: Alma 24: 10) And I also ...


7

According to most Christian traditions, God cannot change His mind. There are those that teach that He can change His mind, a position inherent in Open Theism. However, this is seen as a heresy by most orthodox Christian traditions. It denies the omniscience of God. From http://www.reformationtheology.com/2011/07/does_god_ever_change_his_mind.php ...


7

Peter does not say "and if you don't get baptized you won't be saved". Almost all Christian denominations take the view that baptism is the normal thing to do, and that Christians should do it. That doesn't imply that failing to do so for some reason invalidates your faith or excludes you from salvation. Likewise there is nothing in the Acts passage that ...


7

The answer to your question is further on in the chapter. Hebrews 10:11-14 ESV And every priest stands daily at his service, offering repeatedly the same sacrifices, which can never take away sins. But when Christ had offered for all time a single sacrifice for sins, he sat down at the right hand of God, waiting from that time until his enemies should be ...


7

Hebrews 9:22 answers this question definitely: Indeed, under the law almost everything is purified with blood, and without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness of sins. (ESV) The author of Hebrews goes on from this verse to say that the spiritual things needed to be purified with greater sacrifices than that of animals, and pointed to the ...


6

It's important to remember that there were two separate things happening here. The Crucifixion was only the end of the Atonement, which needed to cover both aspects of the Fall: sin and death. When Christ was taken by the Roman soldiers, he wasn't still at the scene of the Last Supper, where Judas had been before he left to go betray him. He went up to ...


6

Just because Jesus forgives you, it doesn't necessarily mean that there are no consequences in the social sense. Forgiveness from God is a purely spiritual condition, that removes the blight of sin from your soul. However, if you have wronged another through your sin, it would be expected that you make some recompense (in your example, you'd return the money ...


6

The speaker is Michael Oh, the founder of Christ Bible Institute Japan. He is of Korean heritage but grew up in America. I found a video (plus transcript) that explains more fully his animosity toward Japan, and the process of forgiveness he underwent. The video is of a talk he gave on night 5 of the Urbana missions conference in 2009. The animosity ...


6

This question could also entail those who lived prior to the giving of the law, such as Abraham. Paul gives us the answer in his letter to the Romans. But now the righteousness of God has been manifested apart from the law, although the Law and the Prophets bear witness to it— 22 the righteousness of God through faith in Jesus Christ for all who ...


6

Jesus also said: “Behold, I am sending you out as sheep in the midst of wolves, so be wise as serpents and innocent as doves. (Matthew 10:16) and Do not give dogs what is sacred; do not throw your pearls to pigs. If you do, they may trample them under their feet, and turn and tear you to pieces. (Matthew 7:6) Wisdom would suggest that one choose ...


6

The OP asks: Catholics say that our future sins are not forgiven...and say that John 20:23...uses the past, i.e. "forgiven", so ask how future sins can be forgiven. What information there is on the verb "forgiven” here...? Since nobody seems to have addressed the issue of verb tense here, I’ll give it a try. The verb in question is infected as a third ...


6

According to this article: Has Martin Luther's "Snow-Covered Dunghill" Mystery-Legend Been Solved?! the answer to the question is, "No, he did not say that, but it sounds like something he would have said." Luther said: Conceived in sorrow and corruption, the child sins in his mother’s womb. As he grows older, the innate element of corruption ...


5

Outside of being offered by their father in this incident, there are really only two things we know about Lot's daughters: they were betrothed or in some translations actually married to men of Sodom (Gen. 19:14 - the latter option making Lot's claims to their virginity suspect), and after the destruction of Sodom, they get their father drunk and seduce ...


5

It is vitally important that you look at the previous few verses in order to get context. Let's take the whole passage in the NIV: Some men brought to him a paralyzed man, lying on a mat. When Jesus saw their faith, he said to the man, “Take heart, son; your sins are forgiven.” At this, some of the teachers of the law said to themselves, “This fellow is ...



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