Hot answers tagged

19

Unlike Judaism, Christianity has no rule prohibiting (or commanding) the eating of pork. In fact, in Acts 10:9-16, Peter has a vision where a sheet is lowered from Heaven with "all sorts of animals, reptiles, and birds" on it. He is then commanded to get up, kill, and eat the animals. To this, Peter is shocked and replies that he has never eaten anything ...


14

Some ambiguity in interpretation causes confusion. In addition to the passages you cited, I can think of one other in the Doctrine and Covenants with specific reference to meat: And whoso forbiddeth to abstain from meats, that man should not eat the same, is not ordained of God; For, behold, the beasts of the field and the fowls of the air, and that ...


14

There are a number of verses that talk about what you should or can eat and a few of them do concern vegetarian eating. There are a number of Christian sects that even have a "health message," where they prescribe a vegetarian diet. I think the most notable one is Seventh Day Adventists, but note that the diet is a suggestion in their mind, not Biblical law. ...


12

Protestantism and Tradition I'm coming at this answer from a Protestant perspective. Since I've seen a variety of folk in my branch of Christianity hold hands during prayer, I'll assume you've been observing my people. We've inherited from Paul a suspicion of traditional rites and practices. When we do observe some custom, we are very likely to either: ...


9

From Mormon.org: Our body is a precious gift from God. To help keep our bodies and our minds healthy and strong, God gave a law of health to Joseph Smith in 1833. This law is known as the Word of Wisdom (see Doctrine and Covenants 89:1-21). In addition to emphasizing the benefits of proper eating and physical and spiritual health, God has ...


9

Well, the word "manna" itself means "What is it?" so I'm not sure you're going to find a perfectly satisfactory answer to your question. :-) In addition, it was created supernaturally by God, and He didn't share the recipe. :-) Since it was a single miracle, and not something that people still eat today, no one really knows personally what it tastes like. ...


8

Not sure how definitive an answer I can provide to this question, but thought I'd contribute a few thoughts that came to mind. The "law," or "law of Moses," was codified by the Rabbi's in ancient times into the mitzvot, a collection of 613 laws compiled from a close reading of the Pentateuch. The mitzvot consists of "positive" (ie "do this") and "negative" ...


8

Canon Law 1251 says: Abstinence from meat, or from some other food as determined by the Episcopal Conference, is to be observed on all Fridays [...] (emphasis mine). In other words it is to be determined by the bishops exactly what constitutes abstinence. The bishops of Quebec can simply state that beaver meat is OK to eat on days of abstinence. They ...


8

Since you did not state which denomination you'd like to find out from, I will provide you an answer from a purely sola scriptura point of view. All verse emphasis mine. Taken wholly, the NKJV Bible does not contain the word vegetarian. However, there are a ton of verses about eating, the virtue of eating, what to eat and what not to eat. Let me give you ...


7

The supposed inconsistency here is clearly that some passages say it's OK to eat anything, but that in Acts 2:15, James judges that non-Jewish Christians should be "not troubled" with the Law except as follows: 19 “Therefore it is my judgment that we do not trouble those who are turning to God from among the Gentiles, 20 but that we write to them ...


7

The "good work" that one can do by eating fish on Fridays is penance. Perhaps it's hard to understand if you love fish and abhor meat, but that's not the case for most people. The following lines contain an excerpt of Keeping Friday, from the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops: Jesus invited to carry the Cross and do penance for the good of the Church ...


7

I find no reference to Leviticus 11:6 on the websites of the Vatican or the U.S. Council of Catholic Bishops (USCCB). The USCCB does maintain on its website the text of the New American Bible (Revised Edition), or NABRE, which is the only translation approved for public liturgical use in the United States. The NABRE translates Leviticus 11:4–6: 4 ...


6

The Encyclopedia of Mormonism article on Emergency Preparedness explains that this practice is about simple pragmatism. It really has little if anything to do with eschatology; rather, the concept that members should maintain a stored supply of food is based on the simple reality that disasters and emergencies, both personal and wide-scale, do happen, and ...


6

The Word of Wisdom refers both to Doctrine and Covenants section 89, and also to its interpretation. The scripture is listed here: http://www.lds.org/scriptures/dc-testament/dc/89?lang=eng As with many issues in LDS doctrine, some aspects are specified, and others are left open-ended. The official list from mormon.org posted above contains a few items that ...


6

There seem to be two different questions addressed by the New Testament relevant to this issue: Does eating certain foods defile a man? Should certain people abstain from certain foods? I don’t think the New Testament teachings contradict. Jesus’ teaching in Mark 7 declares that the first question is answered ‘no’: there is nothing inherent in certain ...


6

The Catechism of the Catholic Church has useful information on how we should treat the animals. [2416] Animals are God's creatures. He surrounds them with his providential care. By their mere existence they bless him and give him glory. Thus men owe them kindness. We should recall the gentleness with which saints like St. Francis of Assisi or St. ...


6

"Meat" in this sense means, and has historically meant, what used to be called "flesh meat", which St. Thomas Aquinas described as "the flesh of animals that take their rest on the earth" [including birds, who rest in trees on the earth] (Summa Theologica, Second Part of the Second Part, Question 147, Article 8). Exceptions to the rule of "no meat on ...


5

There never were any dietary Laws enforced in the New Testament aside from polite rules derived from brotherly love and the desire for peace during the time of transition between the shadows of the Old Testament and the realities found in Christ. Jesus called the crowd to him and said, “Listen and understand. What goes into someone’s mouth does not ...


5

A "potluck", in this context, is nothing more than a meal shared among members of a Church after a service. There's no doctrinal or ritual significance to it, as you know, and it's not ordained. it's simply sharing a meal amongst our Church family. Jesus often ate with His disciples, so an argument could be made that Christians can trace it there. You ...


5

The bible portrays that God's original perfect design for his creation included that for humans be vegetarian: God said, “Now we will make humans, and they will be like us. We will let them rule the fish, the birds, and all other living creatures.” - Genesis 1:26 CEV 'Rule' - neither constitutes killing nor eating, but rather governing and nurturing - ...


5

Isaiah 55 says: “Come, all you who are thirsty, come to the waters; and you who have no money, come, buy and eat! Come, buy wine and milk without money and without cost. 2 Why do spend money on what is not bread, and your labor on what does not satisfy? Listen, listen to me, and eat what is good, and you will delight ...


4

A great deal of this is copy-pasted from my answer to another, similar question. First off, Revelations 19 has a wedding feast. Revelation 19:9 (NIV) 9 Then the angel said to me, “Write this: Blessed are those who are invited to the wedding supper of the Lamb!” And he added, “These are the true words of God.” (Emphasis mine.) You ...


4

There's no literal indication. Apparently (correct me if I'm wrong on this), the humans knew which animals were pure and which weren't even before of the flood. You can observe this when God tells Noah to take the animals into the ark: 2 Of every clean beast thou shalt take to thee by sevens, the male and his female: and of beasts that are not clean by ...


4

Look at 1 Timothy 4:1-5 (KJV) (note verses 4-5): 1 Now the Spirit speaketh expressly, that in the latter times some shall depart from the faith, giving heed to seducing spirits, and doctrines of devils; 2 Speaking lies in hypocrisy; having their conscience seared with a hot iron;3 Forbidding to marry, and commanding to abstain from meats, which ...


4

Justin Martyr (100–165), unfortunately, doesn't provide much additional insight into his position here or in his other writings. However, his view was a common one in the 2nd and 3rd centuries, so we can better understand it by examining the writings of his contemporaries and immediately subsequent generations of church fathers. Those holding this view ...


4

I think Malachi offers a little more insight into this: When you offer blind animals in sacrifice, is that not evil? And when you offer those that are lame or sick, is that not evil? Present that to your governor; will he accept you or show you favor? says the LORD of hosts. - Malachi 1:8 ESV These are animals that would not be eaten or bred due to ...


3

In 1 Corinthians 11: 17-22, Paul is absolutely railing on the Corinthians: "For in eating, each one goes ahead with his own meal. One goes hungry, another gets drunk." (verse 21.) So far in my research, I've found that early Christians gathered together for love feasts, which was followed by the Lord's Supper. Unfortunately, some of the richer ones brought a ...


3

This question is similar to many questions that find a command in the Old Testament and ask if it should apply to Christians today. It is important to note that the Old Testament refers to the Old Covenant. God has made several different covenants with different people at different times. The covenant which is of note here is the one He made with ...


3

Ansari referred me to the Ethiopian Orthodox Church, which provides an example of this: The food taboos found in the Old Testament are observed by most people as the Ethiopian Orthodox Church prescribes them. The flesh of animals with uncloven hoofs and those that do not chew their cud are avoided as unclean. It is nearly impossible to get pork. Animals ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible