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The definitive difference between what St. Augustine believed and what Luther in all honesty came up with himself is quite different. It's like this: St. Augustine taught that grace is itself transformative and is infused into the soul of humanity, whereby changing their condition and makes the sinner righteous before God. So that when God sees the persons ...


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I think this is simply because English has changed. In modern English "faith of Christ" would mean that faith that Christ had, whereas "faith in Christ" expresses the need to put faith in Christ, i.e. to trust in Christ for salvation. I have no doubt that the translators of the King James were trying to express the same meaning when using "faith of Christ" ...


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The word "miracle" comes from a Latin word which might be translated more directly as "wonder". It's a thing which causes you to be amazed. In this broader sense, yes, both the atheist and the centurion can be said to have experienced something miraculous. There are four words in the Greek of the New Testament that give a more Christian nuance to the idea ...


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To your question of whether theology—what St. Thomas Aquinas calls sacra doctrina ("sacred doctrine")—is possible, see Summa Theologica I q. 1 a. 2 "Whether sacred doctrine is a science?"Sacred doctrine is a science. We must bear in mind that there are two kinds of sciences. There are some which proceed from a principle known by the natural light of ...



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