Hot answers tagged

9

It's actually both. Bear with me; I'll explain. In the first half of Ezekiel 28:1-19, Ezekiel seems to be referring to a human man. Ezekiel 28:1-10 (ESV)  1The word of the LORD came to me: 2 "Son of man, say to the prince of Tyre, Thus says the Lord GOD:     "Because your heart is proud,    and you have ...


8

The way I understand it (and the way I've always seen it taught, whether at my Church, or in various other sermons/articles) is: We inherit a sinful nature, meaning that we have a predilection for sin. The evidence is pretty clear from observation. Nobody has to teach a baby how to be selfish, it's part of our nature. (Some would call it evolutionary ...


8

That's a very good question, and the answer is, we really don't know. We have a single reference in Genesis to widespread practice of sexual immorality, but remember that this is based on one single event that took place after God had already decided to destroy it. What we do know is that not even ten righteous people could be found in the entire region. ...


8

I believe the reason people remember Sodom & Gomorrah for the sexual immorality may be due to: (1) The account in Genesis 19 where the men of the town wanted to have relations with the two angels that were spending the night at Lot's house. (2) The word sodomy creates a huge link to Sodom & Gomorrah. So yes, the traditional interpretation as you ...


6

I am a professional archeologist. Many end times aficionados believe that Magog represents Russia and that Russia will soon come to invade Israel. However, the ancient Assyrians had dealings with Magog, which was also called Lydia, and their Court records clearly identify Magog and it is not Russia. For decades Christians have been deceived and have been ...


6

I find that in a subject like this it is good to compare Christian speculations with Jewish speculations and see if there is any common ground. I found that both Jewish and Christian sources think the most likely location was present day Turkey. For example here is a Jewish source I'm finding more and more useful for Jewish things: “the most reasonable ...


6

Ezekiel 20:25 is not referring to any laws which God had decreed, but the laws which the people had made on their own. Since the people would not follow God's laws, he left them to their own laws. For instance, the NLT says "I gave them over to worthless decrees and regulations that would not lead to life." The laws he is referring to here are the ones ...


4

Your citing of Genesis 6:6 and Ephesians 4:30 is good. That's probably as far as we can go in answering your question, however. I want to say God was indeed grieved by the sin of His chief angel, Lucifer. God had invested a great deal in Lucifer. Lucifer was beautiful to behold, and he perhaps had a special place, or ranking, in the third heaven. Perhaps ...


4

Not everyone in Christianity believes that the third temple will be built as a physical temple. Many believe the ginormous dimensions given for the temple in Ezekiel indicate that it is actually just a spiritual temple being referred to. Some passages indicting that the view of the NT writers was that the third temple was spiritual are Acts 7:48 and ...


4

Magog is included in the "Table of Nations" in Genesis 10 as one of the sons of Japheth after the Flood. It's generally accepted by conservative scholars that the descendents of Japheth were mostly caucasion people who ultimately settled in Europe, so Magog would likely be white and European. The ancient Jewish historian Josephus says that Magog is the ...


4

It is generally a very bad idea to be basing any kind of argument on a single bible verse. The meaning of verses depends very much on the context in which they are written. You always need to be looking at the surrounding passage, and often the whole book that they are written in. In this case the passage from Ezekiel is talking about punishment for ...


3

God makes a distinction between your (the people to whom the prophecy is directed) prophets (e.g. 1 Ki 22:23, Jer 27:9, Jer 27:9, Ezek 13:1-7) and my (God's) prophets (e.g. 1 Chr 16:21-23).1 God's prophets are the only true prophets. The others are false prophets (e.g. De 13:1-5, 2 Ki 18:19, 1 Ki 22:1-28, Jer 2:8, Jer 5:31). Regarding Ezekiel 12:27 ...


2

I guess according to the new site rules, I should declare that this answer is derived from common Protestant interpretations of the King James Bible. I then extend into some programming analogies where I may lose people, these are my own attempt to convert these basic, commonly held Protestant theological ideas into a form that might make understanding ...


2

Original Sin Sin is essentially a rejection of (or deviation from) God (or His ways). I tend to think of the event of Adam's disobedience as the "original sin", which resulted in mankind being separated from God... as opposed to mankind possessing a particular kind of ("original") sin due to Adam's mistake - if that makes sense. In other words: We are ...


2

I grew up in a Methodist church. I don't know if the following is the official theology of the Methodist church, but it is the understanding I have from my years in that community. Original Sin is a big phrase that has more or less import depending who one is talking to; sometimes it simply means "the first sin, committed by Eve and then Adam," and ...


2

This is something I am currently wrestling with. What strikes me is that every Christian has far more knowledge than Ezekiel had. We know what the plans of the the Lord are for the future of every individual we meet - that he has appointed a day when he will judge the world by the man he has appointed, and that he has given proof of this to all men by ...


2

Marriage is a Metaphor for/Illustration of Christianity/Judaism/Religion In numerous places in the Bible, you will see a marital relationship (something we can understand—at least a little) used as a metaphor for or illustration of (genuine) religion, that is, a relationship with God. In the New Testament, Paul talks like this in Ephesians 5:22-33, when he ...


2

Mawia did an excellent job of explaining the meaning of the passage. Let me address the issue of 'adult language'. The Bible wasn't written for children. There is absolutely no reason to expect that everything in it should be 'family friendly'. If God wants to talk about people's sexual behaviour, then he is going to have to talk about sex, and there's not ...


2

You are misreading those Scriptures, they are not all prophesies which were to be fulfilled during Jesus lifetime or even during the Church age. All Scripture is quoted from the King James translation, unless otherwise noted. Isaiah 52:13 through 15 Behold, my servant shall deal prudently, he shall be exalted and extolled, and be very high. As many ...


2

Ezekiel’s Vision is essentially divided into three main parts, according to this Bible study from a Baptist source: Ezekiel’s Vision of the Lords Glory (1:10-28) The Prophet’s Commission and the Hardships He Would Encounter (2:1-10). The Prophet’s Message (3:1-27). And the intention of the vision can be viewed as the following, according to ...


2

The included commentaries include references to the following verses, among others (the citations in each have been preserved in this answer). Daniel 7:13-14 In my vision at night I looked, and there before me was one like a son of man,[a] coming with the clouds of heaven. He approached the Ancient of Days and was led into his presence. 1He was given ...


1

The second part of your question - relating to Ezekiel 18 - is a very good question. I struggled with this when I was a new believer. This chapter talks about personal responsibility - which I needed to hear - but then the New Testament talks about Jesus taking our punishment. I found it confusing. Here is how that chapter ends (Ezekiel 18:30-32): ...


1

It doesn't matter if the prophecies are short or long term; the only thing that matters is if they are truly speaking the word that God gave to them: Behold, I am against them that prophesy false dreams, saith the LORD, and do tell them, and cause my people to err by their lies, and by their lightness; yet I sent them not, nor commanded them: therefore ...


1

all Israel will be saved The phrase above lends itself to several possibilities. Every descendant of Jacob will eventually end up in heaven. All those of Israel who were "blinded" will be saved. Israel is a metaphor for all those of faith who are Abraham's children. The Israel that will be saved is the faithful remnant that remains at the end of the ...


1

You are misreading those Scriptures, because they are not prophecies. First, there is nothing in Isaiah 52:13-53:5 (KJV) that can be considered a prophecy that nations will end up recognise the wrongs they did to Israel. Written towards the end of the Babylonian Exile, this is one of the 'suffering servant' songs and refers to an unknown hero of the exile: ...


1

One can't give a Catholic Opinion on the bible, but you can at least quote what the comments of the New American Bible state without becoming a heretic: So corrupt and depraved are the two sisters that their executioners win the esteemed title “righteous,” for they have acted appropriately as agents of the Lord’s judgment. Comments on Ezekiel 23:36-49 ...


1

Ezekiel 23 25 I shall direct my jealousy against you; they will treat you with fury; they will cut off your nose and ears, and what is left of your family will fall by the sword; they will seize your sons and daughters, and what is left will be burnt. 37 They have been adulteresses, their hands are dripping with blood, they have ...


1

God makes or determines the Prophet and sets a “Prophet (as) a Watchman”. The Prophets are the Son’s of Adam, which Jesus Christ identified Himself also as the “Son of Man” or the Son of Adam. 1 Corinthians 12:29 Are all apostles? are all prophets? are all teachers? are all workers of miracles? Within Christianity there are many perspectives in ...


1

Ezekiel Gog and Magog are described in the Book of Ezekiel. Here, Gog can not be a place, as Gog was the putative king of Magog, prophesied to be defeated by Israel, as we see in Ezekiel 39:11: And it shall come to pass in that day, that I will give unto Gog a place there of graves in Israel, the valley of the passengers on the east of the sea: and it ...


1

Great question! First let's take in the whole chapter. In chapter 20 God is speaking to Ezekiel of the story of how he chose Israel. God tells how gave them good rules, to take away the idols of the other nations from their midst and they would continually disobey. Read Exodus and see how many times they fudge up. "*We should notice this, again, about ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible