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24

Answers in Genesis, an Apologetics site dedicated to defending the Bible as inerrant, gives five "reasonable" possibilities: Bear in mind that the real answer is, "we don't know for sure", and we can't answer what did happen. The best we can do is offer plausible explanations of what might have happened. Typically this is done using common rules behind ...


17

Of course this is more of a historical-archeological question as the Bible does not directly answer but I have stumbled across a fairly convincing argument that would place Thutmose II as the Pharaoh at the time of the Exodus. I first came across the argument in Alfred Edersheim’s Bible History. He typically pays attention to ancient monuments and secular ...


14

I can't speak for God, but here's an answer from a Conservative Baptist point of view. Why does Moses who is a mere mortal have compassion for the people of Israel while God, who is of infinite goodness lacks it? The question assumes that compassion = goodness, and that God's goodness would prevent Him from executing judgment. I believe that this ...


12

The better question may be "What is it that God is jealous of?" He is righteously jealous of the devotion and affections of His people. This is mirrored in our own lives as a married individual is righteously jealous for the affections and devotion of his or her spouse. Furthermore, a father or mother is righteously jealous for the affections of their ...


12

This issue will be debated for a long time. However, Henry H. Halley addresses this issue with great clarity. In his book, Halley's Bible Handbook, Zondervan Publishing House, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 113, "There are two leading opinions: Amenhotep II (1450-1420 B.C.), or Merneptah (1250-1220 B.C.). Merneptah was the son of Rameses II, who was a master ...


12

There are several issues you bring up that need to be addressed in this question, and it is going to take a little space. Only Israel? You are correct in your assumption that God loves the whole world and not just Israel. However, Israel was, indeed, specifically chosen as part of God's plan to proclaim His name throughout the world. Here is a general ...


10

It's not so much that sandals or slippers are considered to be unholy, it's that they're dirty, and removing them is a sign of respect similar to removing one's hat when entering a building, or perhaps removing a nose ring when entering a strict parent's house. From the United church of God's article on the subject: Taking off your sandals was like the ...


7

The method of deducing each date, along with the difficulties associated with each method, are documented at cresourcei.org In short: The older date (1440 BC) is primarily based on the assumption that the Bible is a reliable historical document, with the passage of time based solely upon dates and time periods given from within Scripture. Example: 1) ...


6

The field of Biblical numerology can be a pretty mirky pond. There are some clear trends (three for completion, seven for perfection, a thousand for a really big number, etc.) and a lot of speculation and conclusions that may or may not be warranted. In this case however, the answer is pretty much spelled out in another verse. The 40 years of wandering was ...


6

Numbers 14: 26-35 26 The LORD said to Moses and Aaron: 27 “How long will this wicked community grumble against me? I have heard the complaints of these grumbling Israelites. 28 So tell them, ‘As surely as I live, declares the LORD, I will do to you the very thing I heard you say: 29 In this wilderness your bodies will fall—every one of you twenty ...


6

The short answer is: No one knows. You might think it would be a simple matter of saying, "The Exodus occurred in such-and-such a year, look up who was Pharoah in that year, problem solved." But in practice scholars debate just when the various Pharoahs ruled, and they debate even more when the Exodus happenned. I've seen theories that range from Pepi II, ...


6

This is a really interesting concept in Christian theology, known as typology. Essentially, it is a method of interpreting the Old Testament as a long series of "types" that prefigure aspects of the revelation in Jesus Christ, which are known as "antitypes". This is mentioned in the Catechism of the Catholic Church: The Church, as early as apostolic ...


5

According to most Christian traditions, God cannot change His mind. There are those that teach that He can change His mind, a position inherent in Open Theism. However, this is seen as a heresy by most orthodox Christian traditions. It denies the omniscience of God. From http://www.reformationtheology.com/2011/07/does_god_ever_change_his_mind.php ...


5

Jehovah's Witness have a particular affinity for "Jehovah" as the proper name of God. One of the issues they often point out is that "the LORD," which translates the Tetragrammaton YHVH, is a Jewish superstition that has has somehow corrupted and dishonored the one of whom it speaks. In their understanding of the Godhood (which is assuredly ...


5

I don't have my notes on hand but the bible contains multiple examples of Satan performing God like signs to fool Gods people. The book of Revelations is the obvious example this, but there's more. As far as men performing magic, you also had Bar Jesus. Long story short, although it's not exactly a popular opinion, Satan is illustrated as a being with ...


5

I would like to off up also that Moses was acting as an intermediary between God and Israel. This foreshadows the work of Christ and, in my reading, is why Moses is always "sticking up for" the people by interceding with God and God only shows his justice before relenting to Moses pleas.


5

When? Acts 15 famously records what parts of the Jewish law is considered binding on non-Jewish Christians: 28 For it has seemed good to the Holy Spirit and to us to lay on you no greater burden than these requirements: 29 that you abstain from what has been sacrificed to idols, and from blood, and from what has been strangled, and from sexual ...


4

To understand these verses it's helpful to read them in context. I'm using the King James Version, which seems a bit easier to understand (in particular the part about "touching" Moses' feet). EXODUS 4:22-26 (KJV) And thou shalt say unto Pharaoh, Thus saith the LORD, Israel is my son, even my firstborn: And I say unto thee, Let my son go, that he may ...


4

Like many things Jesus said, the Jews would have found more than just the drinking of the blood offensive. They would have also been offended by the concept of eating Christ's flesh, which is akin to cannibalism in the Bible. The key verse here is this (Leviticus 17:10-14) “‘I will set my face against any Israelite or any foreigner residing among ...


4

The use of the word 'face' is different in these two contexts. In the first use God is said to speak to Moses 'face to face' that is not from some distant position as in a dream, or vision but speaking audibly to him while under some visible form. In other words, God spoke to Moses like a person does who is having a conversation. God spoke out of a ...


4

According to Paul, God is jealous of His own creation: For what can be known about God is plain to them, because God has shown it to them. For his invisible attributes, namely, his eternal power and divine nature, have been clearly perceived, ever since the creation of the world, in the things that have been made. So they are without excuse. For although ...


3

Ultimately, I believe scripture would say that they were stubborn because they were people. Their education and position had nothing to do with their rebellion against God. They were rebellious simply because it was in their character. This nature isn't limited to the Jews only, but also to everyone in the world. As Paul says in Romans 3:9-18: What ...


3

According to the text, yes. Exodus 11 (NASV) 4 Moses said, “Thus says the LORD, ‘About midnight I am going out into the midst of Egypt, 5 and all the firstborn in the land of Egypt shall die, from the firstborn of the Pharaoh who sits on his throne, even to the firstborn of the slave girl who is behind the millstones; all the firstborn of ...


3

I think that the best answer to this question is "Yes...and no." Yes God does not say "I have always been" or "I will always be" or "I am coming". He says "I am." This verse is often used as part of the common Christian understanding that God exists above and outside of the human understanding of time. This verse as a summary of God's universal, ...


3

At the time of Nero Egypt had 7.5 million men: This country is extended as far as the Ethiopians, and Arabia the Happy, and borders upon India; it hath seven million five hundred thousand men, besides the inhabitants of Alexandria, as may be learned from the revenue of the poll tax; yet it is not ashamed to submit to the Roman government, although it ...


3

I don't know about you, but I have seen people get engrossed in things and start excluding their significant others. I know one man who was an alcoholic and another addicted to computer games. In both cases, their significant others (one was married, the other dating) grew upset over this situation — they felt excluded and were jealous of the others on ...


3

If Moses had said: "Okay, go ahead", would God have done it? You can take a look at the narrative of Abraham and Sodom (Genesis 18:16-33) as an example of this opposite case. Abraham, of course, doesn't say "Okay, go ahead and destroy Sodom"—but he doesn't ask for mercy either. His intercession is based on justice instead: it would be unjust, he ...


3

The answer to this question depends on which broad system you accept when reading the Bible. Those systems that see a sharp discontinuity between Old and New Testament (e.g., Dispensationalism, New Covenant Theology, Progressive Covenantalism) will say something like, "The Old Testament laws are done away with in the different era of the New Covenant," or ...


3

Regarding the importance of shoes: Taking off your shoe and giving it to someone was a sign of redeeming and changing in the ancient world. You can find more in Ruth 4:7 KJV Now this was the manner in former time in Israel concerning redeeming and concerning changing, for to confirm all things; a man plucked off his shoe, and gave it to his ...


3

No. This is simply dramatic prose to summarize what what assumes Moses was feeling. It is completely made up by DeMille. The full extent of Moses' flight to Midian is a few verses in Exodus 2 15 Now when Pharaoh heard this thing, he sought to slay Moses. But Moses fled from the face of Pharaoh, and dwelt in the land of Midian: and he sat down by a ...



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