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Ezekiel 47 and 48 definitely deals with the millennial temple and future Israel; it clearly speaks of "Dan" meaning in the future the tribe of Dan is there along with Ephraim. Even the borders of Dan in the millennial kingdom are so different then the boundaries in the Torah. I do not believe God is done with Dan thus the explanation of Revelation and ...


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Look at the big picture. God sent His Son into the world to save the world from sin, not to condemn it (John 3:16). This scripture makes it clear that God did not create man to be destroyed at the first offense of His law, not until they have had a chance to repent and seek redemption through the Gospel of Christ (faith, repentance, baptism, confirmation). ...


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1- We are called in 1 Thes. 5:17 to "pray without ceasing" 2- We are called in Philip. 4:6 to "but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God." 3- In 1 Tim 5 Paul could not heal Timothy & 2 Tim 4 Paul could not heal Trophemus. The Timothy letters were written around AD 62-66 and James around AD 62. We ...


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Based on commentators, there are several views on the significance of Moses being asked to carve the second set. 1. Punishment for Moses Moses having to carve the new tablets out of rock is a punishment for his anger and destruction of the first set. 2. Recognition for Moses Yahweh grants Moses recognition of his role: It is much more natural to seek ...


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I think the answer can be summed up with Jeremiah 13:14-17, "I will not pity nor spare nor have mercy, but will destroy them. Hear and give ear: Do not be proud. For The Lord has spoken. Give glory to The Lord your God before He causes darkness, and before your feet stumble on the dark mountains. And while you are looking for light, He turns it into the ...


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John Piper passionately argues in his 2003 sermon Palm Sunday Tears of Sovereign Mercy that this doesn't contradict the doctrine of foreordination: There is something not quite right about this objection to Jesus’ sovereignty. He can make praise come from rocks. And so he could do the same from rock-hard hearts in Jerusalem. What’s more, all this ...


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Because he was human? Jesus wept over Jerusalem, but he was also amazed, appalled, in wonder, surprised, astonished, and couldn't get over the unbelief that his fellow Nazarenes exhibited (see Mark 6:6). Underlying all these descriptors is a particular kind of emotion, but it is only one of many which Jesus experienced, and a careful study of the Gospels ...


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I can answer this question from the perspective of the theology of Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772), and the denominations that accept his theology. This answer is extracted from my article, "How God Speaks in the Bible to Us Boneheads." For a fuller explanation of these passages about the Ten Commandments, and of the giving of the Ten Commandments in general ...


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Given that we know the damage that divorce can have, its not hard for us to imagine why God would be against divorce in a general sense. Jesus affirming the idea that people shouldn't divorce. The fact that God would allow divorce (Exodus 21:1,21:10–11) in spite of not agreeing with it (Malachi 2:16) reveals something about God's character and divorce ...


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My interpretation of Joel 2 is an army possessed with demons. If you look at Joel 2:9 it says they come in at the windows. Jesus comes in at the door. Demons come in any way but the door. Snakes and scorpions are demons also. There are many types and shadows to know in Scripture. In Luke 11:11-13, Jesus explains that if you ask for something of God, why ...


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I would try to present an emotional approach to explain this situation. First of all, I guess it's sensible to describe disciples' feelings about their life and their Master. Let me try: 1. Dissapointment - their faith in Jesus was touched by events of His death, taking into account: hope for continous friendship with Master, elevating words of Jesus that ...


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Joel 2:28-32 is quoted by Peter in Acts 2:17-21. He says in verse 16 "this is that which the prophet Joel spoke of". So in other words, Joel 2:17-32 were being fulfilled in front of their very eyes at that moment. Now notice Joel 2:28 says, "after this..." So the events leading up to Joel 2:28 had to be fulfilled before Peter spoke in Acts 2. The only ...


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We should not so much look for what the disciples were afraid of, but look at how the story in Mark's Gospel unfolds and why the disciples are being described as afraid, without apparent reason. David Rhoads, Joanna Dewey and Donald Michie say in Mark as Story, page 1, that the composer of Mark's Gospel has used sophisticated storytelling techniques, ...


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Unlike in Catholicism, there is no unified and singular Protestant body of doctrine, so a “Protestant answer” to your question cannot be given. I can, however, provide an answer given by the popular Protestant theologian, scholar, and commentator Matthew Henry who in his commentary of Malachi 1, says: In these verses, they are charged with ingratitude, ...


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I would suugest 4 reasons that Jonah was alive and not dead, then resurrected. 1) as Scacewater posted, the Hebrew is poetic, and " up to my neck" and Sheol references underscore the poetry/literary style of Jonah 2. As an example of the poetic nature, God "spoke to the fish" (spoke is wayomer וַיֹּ֥אמֶר) Jonah 2:10 as in Gen 1. 2) If he were dead, then ...


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One of the hardest verses for a young believer to understand is in Matt. 5:48 "Therefore you shall be perfect, just as your Father in heaven is perfect." Immediately most believers take this as a matter of trying to be a better person, attempting to remove old sinful habits that don't match their new calling to be sanctified in Christ. This isn't the first ...


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Doesn't Proverbs 2: 21-22 disprove “once saved, always saved”? Proverbs 2:21-22 For the upright shall dwell in the land, and the perfect shall remain in it. But the wicked shall be cut off from the earth, and the transgressors shall be rooted out of it. I see three ways to look at these verses. Practical. In context the preceding verses talk ...


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As Christians, our righteousness-or 'uprightness' in this context comes from us being In Christ, and thus having His Righteousness, His uprightness. Therefore, the wicked are those who are not in Christ. Otherwise we would be left with the problem of how righteous/upright do we have to be to live in the land?


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"If we interpret it as referring to all rulers at all times this statement does not seem to agree with reality." Absolutely right, it does not. And that's your first clue that the statement doesn't mean that. It means rulers in general "are not a terror to good conduct, but to bad". Talking in the general like that was perfectly normal and would have ...


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In the New Testament, there is a line of thought concerning reward. In Matthew 5 and 6 the Lord Jesus speaks repeatedly concerning reward (5:12, 46; 6:1-2, 5, 16). In 1 Corinthians 3:8 Paul says, Each will receive his own reward according to his own labor. Then in verse 14 he goes on to say, If anyone's work which he has built upon the foundation ...


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I just wanted to add to what timf so beautifully put in reference to 1 Corinthians 3:11-15 the works of our own, are "wood hay and stubble" they will get burned up, the flesh has been crucified. It os no longer us that live but Christ in us. (Galations 2:20) The Gold Silver and Precious Jewels are works of the Spirit of Jesus in and through us. ...


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In first century Greek parlance, ego eimi (ἐγώ εἰμί "I am") was used to refer to the God of the Jews, in the belief that this was the meaning of the Hebrew Tetragrammaton, YHWH, which was thought to mean "I am that I am." John's Gospel, written in Greek, often uses plays on words and, in this case, has Jesus say "I am" when the priests think he is telling ...


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Here are a few commentaries on this verse from Christian Bible scholars. To a large extent, they agree with your suspicion that the men were reacting to Messiah's use of the words "I AM," and the authority with which he spoke them. Parenthetical notes are the original authors'. From Elliot's commentary for English Readers: They went backward, and fell ...


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This question stems from a lack of understanding of what the ancients believed "heavens and earth" mean, or what they believed the whole of creation looked like. The Ancients weren't aware of other planets. Just earth, hence they are referring to the Earth when they say "earth". It was not out of neglect that they don't also say "and other planets", but out ...


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If the human race evolves to such a state that we can colonize other planets. In my opinion no land will be necessary. As the humans can create living space anywhere in space. We could create our own artificial planets (mother-ships) that would hold millions of people and actual 'Earth'(planet) will not be required. I would suggest that all living space ...


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We were never meant to be perfect because Jesus Christ wants us to be completely dependent on him. We we not meant to sin constantly and constantly do that because we would never enter into God's Kingdom. We would all never enter into God's Kingdom because of not repenting and changing from sinning to doing righteousness. Holy Bible quotes: I am the ...


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The only good answer to this is "We don't know". And we don't know because the people writing the book had no concept of 'land outside of our planet'. For them there were only three parts to creation: Heavens, Earth and the Underworld, floating on a cosmic ocean. It is completely impossible to definitively state whether their words were intended to include ...


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Jude 1:9 appears to be quoting from Assumption of Moses, an apocryphal, pseudepigraphical work written or last edited by a Jew in the first century CE. Origen stated in De principiis, III,2,1: "We have now to notice, agreeably to the statements of Scripture, how the opposing powers, or the devil himself, contends with the human race, inciting and ...


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"Weaker" Can Also Be Interpreted Physical Strength The Greek word used for weaker is asthenos, which comes from the prefix "a-", meaning not coupled with the root "sthen[os]" for bodily vigour. To say women tend to have less bodily vigour or physical strength seems much more reasonable than the false suggestion woman are somehow morally inferior. ...


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As @fredsbend has said, each group has their own "go to" theologians that they lean on heavily, at least for theological interpretations. Because of this, you would need to specify a denomination or group that uses a particular source or foundational texts as a guide to interpreting the Bible from a theological perspective. You ask about the process through ...


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Jesus is talking about the time when Jesus is back to the world as King. The second coming. Time of grace is over by that time. That time, whoever is willfully against his kingdom will be punished because they know that Jesus is God and still do not want to acknowledge him. Jesus is talking about the guardians of faith who rejected Jesus. To prove the ...


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According to the Gospel of John Jesus was probably crucified on Nisan 14, the preparation Day, Thursday. John 19:14, John 19:31 and John 19:42. There was an extra Sabath that week on Friday the start of Feast of Unleaveded Bread. I doubt that there was ever a preparation day before the weekly sabath, Saturday. But I could be corrected.


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According to reputable scholars the Sabbath was always on a Saturday. And, the day of the Passover Feast (which lasted a whole week ) would always be governed by the Hebrew calendar, a lunar calendar, and thus the Passover started on different days each year. However, we know from John's gospel that in the year Christ was crucified, the Passover AND the ...


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"Heaven and earth shall pass away; but my words shall not pass away" - (Matthew 24:35; Mark 13:31; Luke 21:33). The Bible records it three times for double emphasis. It simply means that all created matter may pass away (because the heaven and earth were created by God (Genesis 1:1), but the Word of The Omnipotent God (Revelation 19:6), The Only Potentate (1 ...


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In the Greek weaker vessel can mean not weaker as in physically but weaker in morals. From an English/Greek Lexicon: “ἀσθενής,” Def 2c. from: A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature (3rd ed.) Walter Bauer, revised by F.W. Danker. University Of Chicago Press, 2001.



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