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Starting with the common understanding [no pun intended]/characteristics of wisdom: Generally it is associated with a noble ripe old age. Grasp what works and doesn't. Enables the possessor to make good judgments and arrive at sound decisions i.e. judge wisely, and make wise decisions. Etc. The fear of the Lord, one of the seven gifts of the Holy ...


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The gifts of the Holy Spirit are briefly explained in the Catholic Encyclopedia's article on The Holy Ghost The gift of wisdom, by detaching us from the world, makes us relish and love only the things of heaven. The gift of understanding helps us to grasp the truths of religion as far as is necessary. The gift of counsel springs from supernatural ...


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To understand Leviathan, the reader of Job must understand the spiritual conflict that is going on between God and Satan. I have taken some time and license setting the stage. For the suspicious among you, you may wish to jump to the last summary paragraph. For the less hurried, hardy among you, bring your best thinking about the poetic conflict. You must ...


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This was a demon-possessed person and it was known by most everyone in town that she had the spirit of divination. Think about this hypothetical. If you were to go outside and preach about the gospel to people at the park, and Charles Manson started saying and shouting that you are preaching truth, people automatically doubt what you are saying. Not only ...


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I guess I take a slightly different view. To me, the parable of the workers in the vinyard in Matthew 21:1 ff. is about human attitudes about entitlement, than anything else. At the end of the day, settlement was made first with those who went out at the eleventh hour, and last with those who went out the first hour. When those who were engaged the 11th hour ...


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OK, I admit these are not explicitly Christian examples, but I would submit that they clearly demonstrate the difference between knowledge, understanding and wisdom. Example 1: Knowledge: you know when you press the "on" button, that the computer activates. Understanding: you know that after pressing the "on" button, the electricity from the power grid ...


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Isaiah 14:21 is not a commandment. It seems like the principle actor in each portion of this passage is God, not man, and this is certainly in God's purview. v 5 "The LORD has broken the staff of the wicked," v 12 “How you have fallen from heaven," v 15 "Nevertheless you will be thrust down to Sheol," The verses following 14:21 are a ...


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A possible answer to this parable can be found by looking at two passages. Matthew 19:27-30: "Peter answered him, “We have left everything to follow you! What then will there be for us?” Jesus said to them, “Truly I tell you, at the renewal of all things, when the Son of Man sits on his glorious throne, you who have followed me will also sit on twelve ...


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Is there a difference? The words in question in Is 2 are chokmah (2451; wisdom, skill, shrewdness) and biynah (998; understanding, discernment). tabuwn (8394; understanding, intelligence) is a close synonym, also used in conjuction with "wisdom" (e.g. Ex 31:3, Job 12:13). If there is a meaningful difference between the two, it is subtle and there might not ...


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I love this parable. The labourers symbolize humans, so you and me and everyone else. The householder is God. Working in the vineyard represents being faithful to God in your lifetime. And the money symbolizes Heaven/God's Glory. The first group of people work for the whole day. So this means that the first group are faithful and obedient to god for their ...


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God always and continually calls people, some very early on in their lives (e.g. Samuel), through to some in the twilight of their lives, even on their death beds (e.g. the good thief). The reward is the same though there is a variation in degrees [of glory]. Just as the denarius is stamped with an image, the reward of the elect who have worked in the ...


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Although I am not comfortable thinking of the account of God's creation of Eve as being in any way allegorical or mythical, I do, however, think of the account as a kind of artistic and symbolic version of what actually transpired when God created another human being--a female human being--in His image who would complement the male of the species whom He had ...


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God is more amazing than we will ever comprehend. We still don't know what all is a part of this planet we live on, and yet He was able to create it all just by speaking. (Genesis 1) He knew how to make everything work together to sustain life. He knew how to form us so that we could function the way we do. All the intricacies that "make us tick" that ...


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It doesn't really make sense to try to reconcile DNA and Genesis. The only way to combine them is to awkwardly shoehorn our understanding of DNA into the Genesis account, and simply say, God made the DNA to look different than Genesis says it should look. For example, Genesis 1 has land plants being made first, then water creatures and birds, then land ...


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There are at least two possible answers to the question. Some Christians consider the stories in Genesis to be allegorical, describing what God did in language and concepts that the original audience would understand. Since the original audience was neither aware of DNA, or mitochondria, this would have been a detail that obscured the message. Those who ...


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The Catholic Church does stand behind the verse, but insists that it be read in context, and in the context of the literary genre of the passage. As such it applies only to the children of the King of Babylon at the time the passage was written, and was long ago made moot, no longer applying to living persons. Further it does not command anyone to commit ...


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From the Catechism of the Catholic Church: Catechism of the Catholic Church 1825 Christ died out of love for us, while we were still "enemies." [Rom 5:10]. The Lord asks us to love as he does, even our enemies, to make ourselves the neighbor of those farthest away, and to love children and the poor as Christ himself. [cf. Mt 5:44; Lk 10:27-37; ...


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Jesus himself shows us that we should not interpret the Bible literally, but must always apply context ie. account for factors like genre, historical situation, cultural background, audience and author's intent. He cures a sick woman rather than upholding an uncompromising law: ...whoever does any work on the sabbath day shall be put to death. (Exodus ...


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1 Corinthians 13 is one of those chapters that tends to be read at weddings and get taken out of context. Because of its association with weddings, many associate it with romantic love, and David Stratton is right to say clearly that this is not what Paul was thinking about. If you look at chapter 12, you'll see that Paul was addressing the issue of the ...


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Since Paul didn't expand on this, the best we can do is to review what noted theologians have said about this. To get some good answers, you really need to look no further than Bible commentaries. Bear in mind that the type of love here is agape love, which is also translated as charity, or selfless love. It's not speaking of romantic love as on "love ...


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By studying Christ's teachings on love, we can get a better understanding of the belief of love. He gives us an idea of how strong his love us for us in John 15, as well as guidance on how to love one another. He loves us as the Father loves him. If we obey, we remain in his love. He states we're his friends and that everything he's learned from his ...


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I believe that all the suggestions for the 3 different types of period of time are possible. A day in the Lord is different to the day of man being a thousand years in our time. If a reference to God doing something would more likely relate to his time than to mans meaning a thousand years. When Adam was naming the animals would be in the lords time as the ...


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The Bible can be understood in two ways: Factually Every sentence is assumed to be literally true. For this to be the case, then it must be possible to pull out any two verses without them giving different accounts or contradicting each other. However, there are counterexamples such as: These are the names of the warriors whom David had: ...


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I'm glad to hear you'll take non-Catholic responses. People tend to think of the lake of fire when they think of hell (or hades). Thing is, the Bible states "And death and hell were cast into the lake of fire. This is the second death." (Rev 20:14 KJV) A few verses before that it says, "And the devil that deceived them was cast into the lake of fire and ...


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I will take a different approach to the whole idea of hell than the catholic and many protestant directions choose to take and point out these things: Giving the devil his own place to live and torture people to enternity, because he rebelled against God makes little sense. That would be a gift to a creature who left, and started a war to dethrone God. ...


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It appeared that Jeremiah was not committing an offense in the sight of God, by not disclosing the whole truth to the officials, who were seeking his life. Jeremiah's account is similar to Samuel's (1 Samuel 16:1-5). In fact, it was the Lord Himself who advised Samuel not to tell the whole truth in that situation: The LORD said to Samuel, "... Fill your ...


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Approaching it from this angle: In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. So hell is not part of the original creation. We also know that [Now] war arose in heaven, Michael and his angels fighting against the dragon; and the dragon and his angels fought, 8 but they were defeated and there was no longer any place for them in heaven. It is ...


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According to the vision of Brother Pacificus, the throne of Lucifer was reserved for the St. Francis of Assisi. From this I infer that the other thrones of the fallen angels are available to other saints. Excerpt from "The Mirror of Perfection by Brother Leo of Assisi" In the morning Brother Pacificus returned to him. Blessed Francis was standing ...


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I have always understood it as being connected with the Mystical Body of Christ. If we endure, stay firmly connected to the Mystical Body, then just as Christ is the King of the Universe, we are also part of that kingship by our connection to Him.


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Yes, it appears from the description that Jeremiah was not completely honest with the officials. They probably were asking about Jeremiah's prophecies, and he did not tell them what they wanted to know. Whether this is technically lying depends on exactly what questions were asked and exactly what answers Jeremiah gave, but it's pretty clear that Jeremiah ...


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To be in Christ is the safest place we can be. Outside of Christ--in other words, standing in our own merits--is the most dangerous place we can be. Paul tells us in 2 Corinthians "Therefore if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creature; the old things passed away; behold, new things have come. Now all these things are from God, who reconciled us to ...


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The Water and Blood represent the two great Sacraments of the Church, Baptism and Communion. Their flowing from Christ's side at His death tell us that His Bride, the Church, is born on this day just as Eve, Adam's bride, was born from his side at the dawn of the pre-Christian world. The symbolism here is very profound, which explains why John is so moved by ...


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To believe in Jesus is not the same as to believe about Him. To believe in Jesus means to trust Him, to entrust and commit ourselves to Him, to lay hold, to lean, and to rely upon Him. This includes believing that whatever He says is the truth.


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Since there are tons of different places in which Paul uses the phrase, some specific references might help here. In Acts 24:24, for example, Paul refers to "faith in Christ Jesus." Faith here refers not to the pseudo-power claimed by the "word of faith" movement, but rather having faith in the testimony of Christ. Romans 6:3, on the other hand, refers to ...


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The New American Bible (Revised Edition) is the translation that I have; this is the only translation which is authorized to be used in Catholic worship in the United States. The NABRE offers this as the dialogue (Mark 10:21–22): Jesus, looking at him, loved him and said to him, "You are lacking in one thing. Go, sell what you have, and give to ...


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The one thing he lacked was actually the most important thing - saving faith in God. That he lacked this is evidenced firstly by his failure to put his trust wholly in Christ to follow Him no matter what, but also by his failure to obey the first (and greatest) commandment evidenced by him prioritising his wealth over the will of God. No one can serve ...


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My Revised English Bible, [Oxford Press 1989] says: 'slain since the foundation of the world'. This seems to be a more logical and historically accurate translation. I see Proverbs 8:22-31 as the story of Jesus at the beginning.


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You're going to find mixed opinions about what this means, but the most common thing you will find is that this is referring to Christ being destined to die for us since before the creation. We must remember that God is not confined to our perception of time - He is limitless, almighty, all knowing. He knows all things that have been, are, and are to come. ...


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To me, it seems the parable of the sower relates to all born again believers. Since the natural man does not comprehend, nor does he seek the things of God (Ps 10:4), because they are foolishness to him (1 Cor 2:14), it is not in the soil's power to live or die spiritually in response to the seed. Only God can enable a man to hear. Faith is a spiritual ...


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I believe that He stripped Himself of His divinity, to be born the most humble and helpless thing in the universe...a baby. I believe that He had to have laid it aside to become as human as you and I. The only difference in His birth...He was born with a living spirit...the same as Adam had before he fell, whereas, all humanity are born with a dead ...


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No man can serve two masters: for either he will hate the one, and love the other; or else he will hold to the one, and despise the other. Ye cannot serve God and mammon. (Matthew 6:24) Money is a means of exchange. It is essential that we use money in our day to day activities. Usage of money does not mean we worship money. It is the love of money ...


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In the following verse Jesus mentions another prophecy to be fulfilled: Luke 22:37: For I say unto you, that this that is written must yet be accomplished in me, And he was reckoned among the transgressors: for the things concerning me have an end. A transgressor is, by definition: One who transgresses; one who breaks a law, or violates a command; ...


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What made Hebron special? There are a number of reasons. Because God chose it! God's having chosen Hebron made Hebron special to God, and thus to David. God always knows best. Always. God sometimes tells us to go to go in a specific direction or to places that simply do not make sense to us. That is His prerogative, and our response should be ...


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Catholic understanding Food noun any nourishing substance that is eaten, drunk, or otherwise taken into the bbody to sustain life,provide energy, promote growth, etc. more or less solid nourishment, as distinguished from liquids. a particular kind of solid nourishment: a breakfast food; dog food. whatever supplies nourishment to ...


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Treating on the issue of celibacy: there is evidence that the Gnostics (a group claiming the title Christian but were far from (I do not have my copy of Pagels's The Gnostic Gospels to give a more specific example at this time)) denounced sex, sexuality, as well as the consumption of meat as "of this world" and forbade it to all members for all time. That ...


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Don't trust a Catholic layman's interpretation of the Bible because if you get one, you're getting it from a heretic! Nevertheless, you can probably figure out that the word abstain is not the same as anathematize. The message, that I get from reading GK Chesterton in a louder fashion than 1 Timothy I think is essentially the same. Don't mix piety with ...


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I don't see this particular passage referred to in, for example, the Summa Theologica (where I might expect to see it in an Objection to a discussion of whether priests should be celibate). In fact, I don't see in the Summa (though surely it must be somewhere) any discussion of the question of priestly celibacy. In the (standard Catholic) New American ...


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Unfortunately, there's no contextual verse where God says to David "...and this is why I want you to go blah blah blah." Therefore we must infer what the reason is based on the surrounding context and circumstances. We know, from the text, that David had just finished doing battle. We also read that at the time all of Israel was under one King, Saul, who ...



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