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1

By asking, "Why do you call me good?" our Lord Jesus is saying either I am God and good or I am neither God nor good, as others have fully explained above. But what has so far been missed is that He is also pointing the finger at the young man, who thinks he is himself a pretty good guy. Jesus is saying "You are not good." This is the root problem for the ...


2

You appear to be misreading the Scripture, in order to understand a verse of Scripture we must also read and understand the other verses before and after the one we want to understand, and sometimes we even have to read and understand the Chapters before and after the one containing our verse. Sometimes we even have to understand what the entire book is ...


0

Well first lets start with the verse in question Those who are spiritual can evaluate all things, but they themselves cannot be judged by others. 1corinthians 2:15 basically since your not asking any specific denomination I will just give a general answer which I believe all denominations could agree upon. This verse is refering to the Children of God ...


0

About the Mathew reference to Hosea 6:6, I was surprised to see the word mercy used. In another translation (NASB) they use the word loyalty. The Strongs word used is #2617 kheh'-sed which uses such nouns as lovingkindness, goodness, faithfulness, love, acts of kindness. So it looks to me like a better word choice would have been loyalty or faithfulness.


-2

This answer takes a different approach. That God cannot contradict himself, that there is scriptural coherency regarding the indissolubility of marriage, and from Church Teaching, the teaching on the indissolubility of marriage comes through Scripture and Tradition. There is an actual example right there in the Gospel cf. Mk 6:18 (RSVCE): “It is ...


8

Good question! In the New American Bible (Revised Edition), which is the translation authorized by the U.S. Council of Catholic Bishops for use in the United States, Matt. 19:9 reads: I say to you, whoever divorces his wife (unless the marriage is unlawful) and marries another commits adultery. (Note: you don't specify which translation you're using; ...


8

A catholic within the parameters set by the Magestarium can interpret this verse in the following ways: Sexual immorality can be a valid reason for civil divorce. But such divorced couples cannot remarry. The word used in Matthew 19:9 for sexual immorality is: porneia. This word can also mean marriage with close relatives. (Ordinary Greek word for adultery ...


0

The most likely scenario: God said: “My Spirit will not contend with humans forever, for they are mortal; their days will be a hundred and twenty years.” About 20 years later God instructed Noah to build the ark. When Noah finished building the ark 100 years had passed, as it shows us in: Genesis 5:32: And Noah was five hundred years old: and Noah begat ...


0

The early church fathers explained the verses where Jesus claims to have a God as referring to both in his divinity and his humanity. It means that Christ has his own Father as God not only his human nature but also in his divine nature. The Son has his Father as his "God" because the Son's being "God" came from his Father via begetting. In other words, ...


1

First, to do an exegesis on the passage in question, I would not that there is a parallel passage to your citation from John in each of the other three Gospels: Matthew 21:12-13; Mark 11:15-17; and Luke 19:45-46. Comparing Jesus words in the three Synoptic Gospels, with those in John, one finds that John gives a more benign description of the activities in ...


1

One of the comments: "This is too long. Please try to make it more concise." Is this passage a "call to action" for Catholics? Not especially, we are sinners and Jesus was not. Should Catholics be on alert for those who may hijack and corrupt the Church for unsavory purposes? Yes, see Acts IV. And should Catholics feel compelled or obligated to ...


0

ANSWER FROM AN INDUCTIVE BIBLE STUDY PERSPECTIVE PRIOR TO THE INCARNATE WORD: God As Father are in regards to Israel, her King, and those who recognize Him as their Father (See Isaiah 63:16): Deuteronomy 32:6 Do you thus deal with the LORD, O foolish and unwise people? Is He not your Father, who bought you? Has He not made you and established you? ...


1

How do you know how fabulous the Garden of Eden was? There's no description of it where it appears, and we have many places on earth that are just "heavenly" to stroll through. I believe the phrase is being used the same way we use it today to describe beautiful scenery. If the location of this destruction is in Israel (scholars are not unified in a ...


0

Jesus was the last Adam. Adam was created in the image of God but being a created entity, obviously did not have the attributes of omniscience, omnipotence and omnipresence. In order to be the appropriate sacrifice Jesus had to be incarnated in the likeness of Adam, with all the same limitations Adam had. If Jesus had an advantage over Adam (maintaining ...


1

An excellent question, and one that I've pondered myself in the past. A pastor I knew once actually gave a sermon on the issue. His explanation paraphrased is that Uzzah thought that the ark touching him would not sully it, while it touching the ground would. Uzzah's actions, though seemingly innocuous enough, stemmed from a fundamental misunderstanding ...


0

Since nobody has mentioned this yet, let me add one other important point to the great answers already given (ie: that since it was from top to bottom, it shows it was God doing the ripping -@Waggers, that it meant God was opening His holiness to all men through Jesus -@Jonathon Byrd). With the tearing of the curtain, the atonement ritual for Yom Kippur ...


2

Hebrew and Greek Words Translated as 'Wine' When the Bible referes to "wine" it does not necessarily refer to the same thing every time, there are at least 18 different words that have all been translated as "wine" somewhere in the bible, they are listed below. It is interesting to note that in the N.T., which was composed in Koine Greek, all occurrences ...


1

We mustn’t read more into the text than the Bible allows. The Bible reveals Uzzah’s physical death the Bible does not reveal his eternal outcome. He may have passed into the presence of the Lord. The Arc of the Covenant was the dwelling place of God; Uzzah’s error was attempting to save God by steadying the arc. God is the Savior of mankind not the ...


2

The implication of Numbers 4:15 is that God forbids non-priests from touching holy things like the Ark of the Covenant. Apparently, God killed Uzzah because he, not being a priest, touched a holy thing contrary to God's commandment.


1

I would hate that the Church is still under the Roman Kingdom - iron and clay. Divided. Without getting into the discussion of the Millenium Kingdom, I thought it might be helpful to take a look at Daniel 2:43-45 (let's use the NIV): And just as you saw the iron mixed with baked clay, so the people will be a mixture and will not remain united, any ...


-2

Two questions. What is a vessel ? Is it not simply a container? Is a vessel physical or spiritual? I would believe physical. If not mistaken, the body, referred to here as a vessel, carries that which is spiritual. Keep in mind that in Peter's day most women were completely dependent on there spouse for everyday things on which to live. Not so today in this ...


-1

Coals when burning fire red and this is not literal but when you do good to an enemy or someone that hates you they become embarrassed and their face turns red because we are to imitate Christ. The woman caught in adultery, what did J esus say to the leaders,:who is without sin cast the first stone and they all walked away embarrassed. Now Jesus was trying ...


2

It seems that the issue here may be due to differing metaphorical purposes of burning coals. Coals can be used to burn and harm, but they can also be used to resharpen and temper as in a forge. From looking at the context of the verse from Paul, it would seem that his usage of the quote would have the latter purpose of to temper or reforge. Earlier he ...


-1

Most definitely. The passage makes it clear that the earthly sanctuary was modeled after another Sanctuary, the True Sanctuary made by the LORD Himself. This is what was shown to Moses in vision. Now this is the main point of the things we are saying: We have such a High Priest, who is seated at the right hand of the throne of the Majesty in the ...


2

Well, that's a very good question. Bible contains several verses to understand how often should we pray, how long should our prayers be, etc... Let's consider on a first hand Matthew 26:41 : Keep on the watch and pray continually, so that you may not enter into temptation. On first reading, one might think we might always pray, that's it : ...


2

If you read a little beyond vs2 in Ecl 5 you'll find this: 4 When thou vowest a vow unto God, defer not to pay it; for he hath no pleasure in fools: pay that which thou hast vowed. 5 Better is it that thou shouldest not vow, than that thou shouldest vow and not pay This is the reason for vs 2. Don't hastily make a promise to God. You may find ...


6

NEVER STOP PRAYING. (1 Thessalonians 5:17, NLT) Christians should dedicate their whole life in prayer and in holiness. There is nothing such as "Praying too much". But ... There is a difference between praying from the heart and vain repetitions. When we say prayer, many Christians misunderstand it as asking something from God. Asking is not the ...


13

The Bible in no place says that you can possibly pray too much. In fact, it says just the opposite. Not only in the passage in Luke, but also in 1 Thessalonialns 5:17, which says we should be praying continually. Like most "contradictions' this one is simple to resolve by showing that the problem arises from taking verses out of context. (See Rules ...


6

Since you pinged me on chat about this, I'll do my best to answer... But honestly, I think it's a very poor question. Therefore, I provide two answers: The one I think you're looking for, and what I believe is the proper answer. I think an OEC who uses this verse as a proof text is using it in the sense that to God time measurement is essentially ...


0

Isaiah Chapter 11 (and hence, the verse you quoted) are qualities of the Messiah - who we know to be Jesus Christ. These gifts are much different from those we see later in the NT (i.e. Paul's writings, the Pentecost). I realize this to be taught as things all people can possess, but I understand it as noted above - a prophecy detailing the very qualities of ...


0

This may be the answer: We Just don't know! 1 Jn 3:2 (RSVCE) 2 Beloved, we are God’s children now; it does not yet appear what we shall be, but we know that when he appears we shall be like him, for we shall see him as he is.


0

The literal vs. figurative paradigm is all-in-all a problematic way to do hermeneutics. It comes from bringing your own theological and philosophical frameworks to the text, rather than taking the text on its own terms and letting it be what it wants to be. For example, we may approach Genesis looking to establish truths about astronomy, biology, and ...


1

The Bible gives us many clues to indicate figurative events. For instance, Jesus clearly tells us when accounts are parables in Matthew 13, giving the parable, then giving the interpretation. Revelation tells us if something was figurative, such as 1:20. The "sign appeared in heaven" in 12:1 "and another sign" in 12:3 tells us that the whole account in ...


3

It is possible that Jonah died in the belly of the fish, based on the language used in Jonah 2, but I think most probable that he did not. Notice Jonah 2:5 (2:6 in Hebrew) says "the waters encompassed me up to my neck." That same Hebrew phrase "up to my neck" was used by David in Ps 69:1, “Save me, O God! For the waters have come up to my neck.” The phrase ...


3

Probably not Jonah spoke of coming out of the belly of Sheol (Hebrew word for grave). Jonah could have been speaking literally or using a figure of speech. Jonah 2:1-2 ESV Then Jonah prayed to the Lord his God from the belly of the fish, 2 saying, “I called out to the Lord, out of my distress, and he answered me; out of the belly of Sheol I cried, and ...


1

I once heard Paul Martini preach on this passage at a Randy Clark Healing ministry conference. He posed that this peace of which Jesus was talking about was a tangible presence that one could quite literally give away or have return to oneself. He also made reference to Mark 4 when Jesus calms the storm. Some translations record Jesus saying 'Peace, be ...


0

Starting with the common understanding [no pun intended]/characteristics of wisdom: Generally it is associated with a noble ripe old age. Grasp what works and doesn't. Enables the possessor to make good judgments and arrive at sound decisions i.e. judge wisely, and make wise decisions. Etc. The fear of the Lord, one of the seven gifts of the Holy ...


1

The gifts of the Holy Spirit are briefly explained in the Catholic Encyclopedia's article on The Holy Ghost The gift of wisdom, by detaching us from the world, makes us relish and love only the things of heaven. The gift of understanding helps us to grasp the truths of religion as far as is necessary. The gift of counsel springs from supernatural ...


-1

To understand Leviathan, the reader of Job must understand the spiritual conflict that is going on between God and Satan. I have taken some time and license setting the stage. For the suspicious among you, you may wish to jump to the last summary paragraph. For the less hurried, hardy among you, bring your best thinking about the poetic conflict. You must ...


5

This was a demon-possessed person and it was known by most everyone in town that she had the spirit of divination. Think about this hypothetical. If you were to go outside and preach about the gospel to people at the park, and Charles Manson started saying and shouting that you are preaching truth, people automatically doubt what you are saying. Not only ...


1

I guess I take a slightly different view. To me, the parable of the workers in the vinyard in Matthew 21:1 ff. is about human attitudes about entitlement, than anything else. At the end of the day, settlement was made first with those who went out at the eleventh hour, and last with those who went out the first hour. When those who were engaged the 11th hour ...


3

OK, I admit these are not explicitly Christian examples, but I would submit that they clearly demonstrate the difference between knowledge, understanding and wisdom. Example 1: Knowledge: you know when you press the "on" button, that the computer activates. Understanding: you know that after pressing the "on" button, the electricity from the power grid ...


3

Isaiah 14:21 is not a commandment. It seems like the principle actor in each portion of this passage is God, not man, and this is certainly in God's purview. v 5 "The LORD has broken the staff of the wicked," v 12 “How you have fallen from heaven," v 15 "Nevertheless you will be thrust down to Sheol," The verses following 14:21 are a ...


1

A possible answer to this parable can be found by looking at two passages. Matthew 19:27-30: "Peter answered him, “We have left everything to follow you! What then will there be for us?” Jesus said to them, “Truly I tell you, at the renewal of all things, when the Son of Man sits on his glorious throne, you who have followed me will also sit on twelve ...


1

Is there a difference? The words in question in Is 2 are chokmah (2451; wisdom, skill, shrewdness) and biynah (998; understanding, discernment). tabuwn (8394; understanding, intelligence) is a close synonym, also used in conjuction with "wisdom" (e.g. Ex 31:3, Job 12:13). If there is a meaningful difference between the two, it is subtle and there might not ...


5

I love this parable. The labourers symbolize humans, so you and me and everyone else. The householder is God. Working in the vineyard represents being faithful to God in your lifetime. And the money symbolizes Heaven/God's Glory. The first group of people work for the whole day. So this means that the first group are faithful and obedient to god for their ...


0

God always and continually calls people, some very early on in their lives (e.g. Samuel), through to some in the twilight of their lives, even on their death beds (e.g. the good thief). The reward is the same though there is a variation in degrees [of glory]. Just as the denarius is stamped with an image, the reward of the elect who have worked in the ...


5

Although I am not comfortable thinking of the account of God's creation of Eve as being in any way allegorical or mythical, I do, however, think of the account as a kind of artistic and symbolic version of what actually transpired when God created another human being--a female human being--in His image who would complement the male of the species whom He had ...


4

God is more amazing than we will ever comprehend. We still don't know what all is a part of this planet we live on, and yet He was able to create it all just by speaking. (Genesis 1) He knew how to make everything work together to sustain life. He knew how to form us so that we could function the way we do. All the intricacies that "make us tick" that ...


-2

It doesn't really make sense to try to reconcile DNA and Genesis. The only way to combine them is to awkwardly shoehorn our understanding of DNA into the Genesis account, and simply say, God made the DNA to look different than Genesis says it should look. For example, Genesis 1 has land plants being made first, then water creatures and birds, then land ...



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