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14

In order to interpret what Jesus is saying in Matthew 19:4, you must first understand the reference he is making. From Matthew 19:4: 4 He answered, "Have you not read that he who created them from the beginning made them male and female, 5 and said, 'Therefore a man shall leave his father and his mother and hold fast to his wife, and the two shall ...


13

Logically, there are two possibilities: either Jesus himself said such things or they were added to the tradition at a later date. Neither view offers a clear-cut explanation, so a wide variety of ideas for the "secretive" passages have been offered by Christian commentators and Bible scholars over the years. Jesus did not tell anyone to remain quiet ...


13

This is not a very good Trinitarian objection for a number of reasons. First, the incarnation occurred at a definite point in history. As the Nicene/Constantinopolitan creed states, "[He] was made man." At the point Numbers became canonical, the Son of God was not yet incarnate. But perhaps more fundamentally, we should not read the Bible in a rigidly ...


12

This question spawns from a misunderstanding of why the genealogy is there in the first place. The genealogy is not a benign collection of facts, much like our own western approach to the topic would have it listed. Instead, Matthew provides Jesus' genealogy to legitimize him for any Jewish readers. First, consider that everyone is from Adam. It means ...


11

Here are a few commentaries on this verse from Christian Bible scholars. To a large extent, they agree with your suspicion that the men were reacting to Messiah's use of the words "I AM," and the authority with which he spoke them. Parenthetical notes are the original authors'. From Elliot's commentary for English Readers: They went backward, and fell ...


11

What lies below is certainly not the only way to interpret this scripture, but it is one way I find extremely compelling, and to my knowledge, provides a reasonable historical understanding. This passage in scripture is built on a long foundation of culture and history, which is largely lost on a modern audience. First, a reminder about the immediately ...


10

Summary: Calvinists interpret these passages as referring to God's righteousness and justice — that he is a fair judge, consistently judging sin as wrong, whether committed by rich or poor, strong or weak, native or foreigner. They do not indicate that God's gracious gifts – wealth, strength, and even salvation – are distributed equally to all. Calvinists ...


9

More of the biblical basis side of things than an overview, but we've just been looking at an answer to this question tonight, as found in Hebrews 4:14-5:10 - Jesus the Great High Priest 14 Therefore, since we have a great high priest who has ascended into heaven, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold firmly to the faith we profess. 15 For we do not ...


9

Unless you only have sex once it can be hard to pinpoint exactly when the child was conceived. Normal term pregnancies range from 37 to 41 weeks, a full month's time. Bathsheba presumably contacted David as soon as she realised she had missed her period and was pregnant. David tried to get Uriah to go home and sleep with her immediately, so that he would ...


9

Beelzebub or Beelzebul? The word "Beelzebub" occurs seven (7) times in seven (7) verses in the 1769 edition of the King James Version translation.1 It is transliterated from the Greek word Βεελζεβούλ which is an indeclinable proper noun (i.e., a name). The accurate English transliteration of Βεελζεβούλ is not "Beelzebub" but "Beelzeboul" (or "Beelzebul"). ...


9

Having chased up the account provided in the answer that follows, I now find there is a full-blown and properly specialist study of precisely this question. Gratifyingly, the main contours are the same, and it looks like Benecke is indeed one of the "heroes" of the tale. Interested readers should therefore consult: Benjamin Schliesser, "‘Exegetical Amnesia’ ...


8

The Veil: Its meaning Most scholars are in agreement on the ultimate conclusion and meaning of the tearing of the curtain. Perhaps none are so succinct as Ezra Palmer Gould in A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Gospel According to St. Mark stating: The rending of the vail would signify therefore the removal of the separation between God and the ...


8

This question at first seemed like a non sequitur to me, but it actually comes from an interesting place. The Eastern Orthodox churches use the Greek word μυστήριον (musterion) to refer to sacraments, but the word actually means 'mystery', and many Orthodox would prefer the term Sacred Mystery over sacrament. Ephesians 5:31-32 says that the joining of a man ...


8

TLDR; In this passage, Jesus uses language claiming God as a personal father; a begetting father, rather than in an abstract, "God is the Father of Humanity" sort of way. From here, the Jews performed simple deductive logic; the son of God is a god, therefore Jesus is claiming to be a god. More specifically, Jesus was claiming to be as divine as God, and ...


8

The most commonsensical explanation of the Messianic Secret is simple self preservation - not necessarily self preservation in the literal sense, but in terms of the mission of Jesus. He couldn't do what he was trying to do if it became well known that he was the messiah. In the time in which Jesus lived, Palestine was under Roman occupation. Jesus was ...


8

Earlier in John is a verse that could potentially help provide an answer to your question: Jesus answered, “The work of God is this: to believe in the one he has sent.” - John 6:29 NIV Another verse in John a little later (after the resurrection) gives further insight: Then Jesus told him, “Because you have seen me, you have believed; blessed are ...


8

As a supplement to David's answer, and in response to your second bullet in particular, let me offer the following. In "ΠΙΣΤΙΣ ΧΡΙΣΤΟΥ: Witness of the Fathers" (1994), Roy A. Harrisville reports on an examination of all the occurrences of this and similar phrases in the Greek Fathers. He lists a number of ambiguous cases, several examples of subjective ...


7

As another answer alluded to, Jesus almost certainly was speaking Aramaic, not Greek when he spoke these words. As such, it is probably a mistake to automatically assume that Jesus was making a philosophical point by using two different words based on the Greek. Instead, we should see what explanations are available as to how the Greek came from the ...


7

The phrases you point out indicate to the Catholic Church that the Holy Spirit was responsible for Jesus' conception: The Annunciation to Mary inaugurates "the fullness of time," the time of the fulfillment of God’s promises and preparations. Mary was invited to conceive him in whom the "whole fullness of deity" would dwell "bodily." The divine response ...


7

I think it's necessary to separate this question into two parts: Why did Judas need to lead the mob to Jesus? and Why did Judas need to kiss Jesus to identify him? I will attempt to answer the first question. Some possible explanations for the second question can be found here: ...


7

We can identify several views regarding the suffering of Jesus. (1) That he did feel fear and grief, but did not sin. (2) That he did not feel fear, per se, but did feel grief. Within (2), there are differing understandings of why Jesus felt grief and agony. Those who (a) accept penal substitution will argue that he was suffering on behalf of his people, ...


7

As someone else stated in an answer to a similar question of yours, "The Catholic Church does stand behind the verse, but insists that it be read in context, and in the context of the literary genre of the passage." In fact, that would be the answer to any question about whether the Catholic Church "stands behind" a particular verse. There's a similar law ...


7

Two prominent advocates of this view are Rudolf Stier (1800–62) and Lloyd John Ogilvie (1930–). They argue both that the apostles erred, and that ultimately the evidence points to Paul being the true 12th apostle. They make several arguments: The method of selection, particularly the casting of lots, was improper The selection was unnecessarily hasty The ...


7

Simon Peter's reaction was inline with his previous self-trusting and impulsive nature, a tendency to rely on self to do what seemed right, rather than a faith that relied on God's promises. This cumulated to the point where he denied the Lord three times, having relied on his own abilities. It was not until the rooster struck that he finally recognized his ...


7

Yes, indeed, the repetition of her name does have significance; Jesus utters no word in vain. St. Thomas Aquinas, in his Catena Aurea (Golden Chain) of the Fathers' commentaries on the Gospels, reports what St. Augustine wrote commentating on Luke 10:38-42: AUG. Martha was as well engaged in ministering to the bodily wants or wishes of our Lord, as of ...


6

The Old Testament and Hebrew linguistic background of this passage should be kept in mind. Recall: Matthew (or his source) was likely translating words that were spoken in Hebrew or Aramaic. Both Jesus and Matthew likely had a Semitic mother tongue. The Hebrew bible (both in its Hebrew and Greek forms) was frequently referenced explicitly by both, ...


6

The bread and wine we offer at Mass do become, in Catholic understanding, "truly, really, and substantially, the body and blood together with the soul and divinity of our Lord Jesus Christ"1, and this is what we consume in the Eucharist. However, this does not mean—as I mentioned in this answer—that the sacrificial offerings are no longer like ...


6

In reality, John 15:26 supports both the Eastern Orthodox and the (Western) Catholic positions, because (at least as far as the Catholic Church is concerned) both positions are valid and complementary. (Note that Eastern Catholics—those who follow the same rites as the Eastern Orthodox but are in communion with the Bishop of Rome—continue to favor the Greek ...


6

I'm sure much could be written about the specific meaning of the Hebrew word for gods, but let me focus on one important interpreter's take: Paul the apostle. In 1 Corinthians 8:4–6, he quotes Isaiah and Deuteronomy to make his case that eating food sacrificed to idols is not inherently wrong: Therefore, as to the eating of food offered to idols, we ...


6

A number of different answers to this question have been given by Christians through history. Broadly speaking, the reasons for the extensive detail given by Moses might be categorized as follows: (1) to foreshadow future events and entities, (2) to demonstrate the importance of religious worship, and (3) to display God's glory. Foreshadowing Christians ...



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