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The Catholic Church certainly teaches that the good thief—often traditionally called St. Dismas—did in fact merit and receive salvation: The parable of the poor man Lazarus and the words of Christ on the cross to the good thief, as well as other New Testament texts speak of a final destiny of the soul—a destiny which can be different ...


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The Son of Man was standing because the throne was already occupied. In the apocalyptic belief of the time, the Son of Man was God’s divine agent who would one day bring judgment on God’s enemies and inaugurate God’s reign on earth. The clearest picture of the role of the Son of Man in canonical scripture is in Daniel 7:13-14: “In my vision at night I ...


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Yes, these do appear to be inconsistencies, but only because we often think of the history of ancient Israel and Judah backwards. The broad consensus of scholars is that the Book of Deuteronomy – though set by its authors in an earlier era – was actually written after the period of the judges and the kings. Worshiping Yahweh in the many temples and 'high ...


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Many places in the Old Testament show the people of Israel either being directed by God, or of their own accord, building altars to Him that were not either in the tabernacle, or (much later) the temple. A sampling of passages: Deuteronomy 27:4ff, "So when you have crossed over the Jordan, you shall set up these stones, about which I am commanding you ...


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In the case of "Eloi, Eloi, lama sabachthani" (Mark 15,34) the Aramaic is needed to explain the misunderstanding in verse 35 when some of the crowd think He is calling for Elijah. The mistake is explicable only because of the similarity between the sound Eloi and the sound Elijah. In the case of "Talitha kuom" (Mark 5, 41) the Aramaic phrase seems to have ...



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