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Here are a few commentaries on this verse from Christian Bible scholars. To a large extent, they agree with your suspicion that the men were reacting to Messiah's use of the words "I AM," and the authority with which he spoke them. Parenthetical notes are the original authors'. From Elliot's commentary for English Readers: They went backward, and fell ...


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This question stems from a lack of understanding of what the ancients believed "heavens and earth" mean, or what they believed the whole of creation looked like. The Ancients weren't aware of other planets. Just earth, hence they are referring to the Earth when they say "earth". It was not out of neglect that they don't also say "and other planets", but out ...


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The only good answer to this is "We don't know". And we don't know because the people writing the book had no concept of 'land outside of our planet'. For them there were only three parts to creation: Heavens, Earth and the Underworld, floating on a cosmic ocean. It is completely impossible to definitively state whether their words were intended to include ...


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John Piper passionately argues in his 2003 sermon Palm Sunday Tears of Sovereign Mercy that this doesn't contradict the doctrine of foreordination: There is something not quite right about this objection to Jesus’ sovereignty. He can make praise come from rocks. And so he could do the same from rock-hard hearts in Jerusalem. What’s more, all this ...


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I can answer this question from the perspective of the theology of Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772), and the denominations that accept his theology. This answer is extracted from my article, "How God Speaks in the Bible to Us Boneheads." For a fuller explanation of these passages about the Ten Commandments, and of the giving of the Ten Commandments in general ...


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In first century Greek parlance, ego eimi (ἐγώ εἰμί "I am") was used to refer to the God of the Jews, in the belief that this was the meaning of the Hebrew Tetragrammaton, YHWH, which was thought to mean "I am that I am." John's Gospel, written in Greek, often uses plays on words and, in this case, has Jesus say "I am" when the priests think he is telling ...


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As @fredsbend has said, each group has their own "go to" theologians that they lean on heavily, at least for theological interpretations. Because of this, you would need to specify a denomination or group that uses a particular source or foundational texts as a guide to interpreting the Bible from a theological perspective. You ask about the process through ...


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Unlike in Catholicism, there is no unified and singular Protestant body of doctrine, so a “Protestant answer” to your question cannot be given. I can, however, provide an answer given by the popular Protestant theologian, scholar, and commentator Matthew Henry who in his commentary of Malachi 1, says: In these verses, they are charged with ingratitude, ...


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I would suugest 4 reasons that Jonah was alive and not dead, then resurrected. 1) as Scacewater posted, the Hebrew is poetic, and " up to my neck" and Sheol references underscore the poetry/literary style of Jonah 2. As an example of the poetic nature, God "spoke to the fish" (spoke is wayomer וַיֹּ֥אמֶר) Jonah 2:10 as in Gen 1. 2) If he were dead, then ...


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"Weaker" Can Also Be Interpreted Physical Strength The Greek word used for weaker is asthenos, which comes from the prefix "a-", meaning not coupled with the root "sthen[os]" for bodily vigour. To say women tend to have less bodily vigour or physical strength seems much more reasonable than the false suggestion woman are somehow morally inferior. ...



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