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13

The Bible in no place says that you can possibly pray too much. In fact, it says just the opposite. Not only in the passage in Luke, but also in 1 Thessalonialns 5:17, which says we should be praying continually. Like most "contradictions' this one is simple to resolve by showing that the problem arises from taking verses out of context. (See Rules ...


8

A catholic within the parameters set by the Magestarium can interpret this verse in the following ways: Sexual immorality can be a valid reason for civil divorce. But such divorced couples cannot remarry. The word used in Matthew 19:9 for sexual immorality is: porneia. This word can also mean marriage with close relatives. (Ordinary Greek word for adultery ...


8

Good question! In the New American Bible (Revised Edition), which is the translation authorized by the U.S. Council of Catholic Bishops for use in the United States, Matt. 19:9 reads: I say to you, whoever divorces his wife (unless the marriage is unlawful) and marries another commits adultery. (Note: you don't specify which translation you're using; ...


6

Since you pinged me on chat about this, I'll do my best to answer... But honestly, I think it's a very poor question. Therefore, I provide two answers: The one I think you're looking for, and what I believe is the proper answer. I think an OEC who uses this verse as a proof text is using it in the sense that to God time measurement is essentially ...


6

NEVER STOP PRAYING. (1 Thessalonians 5:17, NLT) Christians should dedicate their whole life in prayer and in holiness. There is nothing such as "Praying too much". But ... There is a difference between praying from the heart and vain repetitions. When we say prayer, many Christians misunderstand it as asking something from God. Asking is not the ...


5

This was a demon-possessed person and it was known by most everyone in town that she had the spirit of divination. Think about this hypothetical. If you were to go outside and preach about the gospel to people at the park, and Charles Manson started saying and shouting that you are preaching truth, people automatically doubt what you are saying. Not only ...


5

The Catholic Church does stand behind the verse, but insists that it be read in context, and in the context of the literary genre of the passage. As such it applies only to the children of the King of Babylon at the time the passage was written, and was long ago made moot, no longer applying to living persons. Further it does not command anyone to commit ...


5

I love this parable. The labourers symbolize humans, so you and me and everyone else. The householder is God. Working in the vineyard represents being faithful to God in your lifetime. And the money symbolizes Heaven/God's Glory. The first group of people work for the whole day. So this means that the first group are faithful and obedient to god for their ...


5

Although I am not comfortable thinking of the account of God's creation of Eve as being in any way allegorical or mythical, I do, however, think of the account as a kind of artistic and symbolic version of what actually transpired when God created another human being--a female human being--in His image who would complement the male of the species whom He had ...


4

God is more amazing than we will ever comprehend. We still don't know what all is a part of this planet we live on, and yet He was able to create it all just by speaking. (Genesis 1) He knew how to make everything work together to sustain life. He knew how to form us so that we could function the way we do. All the intricacies that "make us tick" that ...


4

There are at least two possible answers to the question. Some Christians consider the stories in Genesis to be allegorical, describing what God did in language and concepts that the original audience would understand. Since the original audience was neither aware of DNA, or mitochondria, this would have been a detail that obscured the message. Those who ...


3

It is possible that Jonah died in the belly of the fish, based on the language used in Jonah 2, but I think most probable that he did not. Notice Jonah 2:5 (2:6 in Hebrew) says "the waters encompassed me up to my neck." That same Hebrew phrase "up to my neck" was used by David in Ps 69:1, “Save me, O God! For the waters have come up to my neck.” The phrase ...


3

Probably not Jonah spoke of coming out of the belly of Sheol (Hebrew word for grave). Jonah could have been speaking literally or using a figure of speech. Jonah 2:1-2 ESV Then Jonah prayed to the Lord his God from the belly of the fish, 2 saying, “I called out to the Lord, out of my distress, and he answered me; out of the belly of Sheol I cried, and ...


3

Isaiah 14:21 is not a commandment. It seems like the principle actor in each portion of this passage is God, not man, and this is certainly in God's purview. v 5 "The LORD has broken the staff of the wicked," v 12 “How you have fallen from heaven," v 15 "Nevertheless you will be thrust down to Sheol," The verses following 14:21 are a ...


3

OK, I admit these are not explicitly Christian examples, but I would submit that they clearly demonstrate the difference between knowledge, understanding and wisdom. Example 1: Knowledge: you know when you press the "on" button, that the computer activates. Understanding: you know that after pressing the "on" button, the electricity from the power grid ...


3

Since Paul didn't expand on this, the best we can do is to review what noted theologians have said about this. To get some good answers, you really need to look no further than Bible commentaries. Bear in mind that the type of love here is agape love, which is also translated as charity, or selfless love. It's not speaking of romantic love as on "love ...


2

Jesus himself shows us that we should not interpret the Bible literally, but must always apply context ie. account for factors like genre, historical situation, cultural background, audience and author's intent. He cures a sick woman rather than upholding an uncompromising law: ...whoever does any work on the sabbath day shall be put to death. (Exodus ...


2

Hebrew and Greek Words Translated as 'Wine' When the Bible referes to "wine" it does not necessarily refer to the same thing every time, there are at least 18 different words that have all been translated as "wine" somewhere in the bible, they are listed below. It is interesting to note that in the N.T., which was composed in Koine Greek, all occurrences ...


2

The implication of Numbers 4:15 is that God forbids non-priests from touching holy things like the Ark of the Covenant. Apparently, God killed Uzzah because he, not being a priest, touched a holy thing contrary to God's commandment.


2

It seems that the issue here may be due to differing metaphorical purposes of burning coals. Coals can be used to burn and harm, but they can also be used to resharpen and temper as in a forge. From looking at the context of the verse from Paul, it would seem that his usage of the quote would have the latter purpose of to temper or reforge. Earlier he ...


2

Well, that's a very good question. Bible contains several verses to understand how often should we pray, how long should our prayers be, etc... Let's consider on a first hand Matthew 26:41 : Keep on the watch and pray continually, so that you may not enter into temptation. On first reading, one might think we might always pray, that's it : ...


2

If you read a little beyond vs2 in Ecl 5 you'll find this: 4 When thou vowest a vow unto God, defer not to pay it; for he hath no pleasure in fools: pay that which thou hast vowed. 5 Better is it that thou shouldest not vow, than that thou shouldest vow and not pay This is the reason for vs 2. Don't hastily make a promise to God. You may find ...


2

1 Corinthians 13 is one of those chapters that tends to be read at weddings and get taken out of context. Because of its association with weddings, many associate it with romantic love, and David Stratton is right to say clearly that this is not what Paul was thinking about. If you look at chapter 12, you'll see that Paul was addressing the issue of the ...


1

The gifts of the Holy Spirit are briefly explained in the Catholic Encyclopedia's article on The Holy Ghost The gift of wisdom, by detaching us from the world, makes us relish and love only the things of heaven. The gift of understanding helps us to grasp the truths of religion as far as is necessary. The gift of counsel springs from supernatural ...


1

Is there a difference? The words in question in Is 2 are chokmah (2451; wisdom, skill, shrewdness) and biynah (998; understanding, discernment). tabuwn (8394; understanding, intelligence) is a close synonym, also used in conjuction with "wisdom" (e.g. Ex 31:3, Job 12:13). If there is a meaningful difference between the two, it is subtle and there might not ...


1

I guess I take a slightly different view. To me, the parable of the workers in the vinyard in Matthew 21:1 ff. is about human attitudes about entitlement, than anything else. At the end of the day, settlement was made first with those who went out at the eleventh hour, and last with those who went out the first hour. When those who were engaged the 11th hour ...


1

A possible answer to this parable can be found by looking at two passages. Matthew 19:27-30: "Peter answered him, “We have left everything to follow you! What then will there be for us?” Jesus said to them, “Truly I tell you, at the renewal of all things, when the Son of Man sits on his glorious throne, you who have followed me will also sit on twelve ...


1

From the Catechism of the Catholic Church: Catechism of the Catholic Church 1825 Christ died out of love for us, while we were still "enemies." [Rom 5:10]. The Lord asks us to love as he does, even our enemies, to make ourselves the neighbor of those farthest away, and to love children and the poor as Christ himself. [cf. Mt 5:44; Lk 10:27-37; ...


1

By studying Christ's teachings on love, we can get a better understanding of the belief of love. He gives us an idea of how strong his love us for us in John 15, as well as guidance on how to love one another. He loves us as the Father loves him. If we obey, we remain in his love. He states we're his friends and that everything he's learned from his ...


1

How do you know how fabulous the Garden of Eden was? There's no description of it where it appears, and we have many places on earth that are just "heavenly" to stroll through. I believe the phrase is being used the same way we use it today to describe beautiful scenery. If the location of this destruction is in Israel (scholars are not unified in a ...



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