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No man can serve two masters: for either he will hate the one, and love the other; or else he will hold to the one, and despise the other. Ye cannot serve God and mammon. (Matthew 6:24) Money is a means of exchange. It is essential that we use money in our day to day activities. Usage of money does not mean we worship money. It is the love of money ...


6

Yes, it appears from the description that Jeremiah was not completely honest with the officials. They probably were asking about Jeremiah's prophecies, and he did not tell them what they wanted to know. Whether this is technically lying depends on exactly what questions were asked and exactly what answers Jeremiah gave, but it's pretty clear that Jeremiah ...


4

I don't see this particular passage referred to in, for example, the Summa Theologica (where I might expect to see it in an Objection to a discussion of whether priests should be celibate). In fact, I don't see in the Summa (though surely it must be somewhere) any discussion of the question of priestly celibacy. In the (standard Catholic) New American ...


4

The New American Bible (Revised Edition) is the translation that I have; this is the only translation which is authorized to be used in Catholic worship in the United States. The NABRE offers this as the dialogue (Mark 10:21–22): Jesus, looking at him, loved him and said to him, "You are lacking in one thing. Go, sell what you have, and give to ...


4

The one thing he lacked was actually the most important thing - saving faith in God. That he lacked this is evidenced firstly by his failure to put his trust wholly in Christ to follow Him no matter what, but also by his failure to obey the first (and greatest) commandment evidenced by him prioritising his wealth over the will of God. No one can serve ...


4

The Catholic Church does stand behind the verse, but insists that it be read in context, and in the context of the literary genre of the passage. As such it applies only to the children of the King of Babylon at the time the passage was written, and was long ago made moot, no longer applying to living persons. Further it does not command anyone to commit ...


4

Although I am not comfortable thinking of the account of God's creation of Eve as being in any way allegorical or mythical, I do, however, think of the account as a kind of artistic and symbolic version of what actually transpired when God created another human being--a female human being--in His image who would complement the male of the species whom He had ...


3

God is more amazing than we will ever comprehend. We still don't know what all is a part of this planet we live on, and yet He was able to create it all just by speaking. (Genesis 1) He knew how to make everything work together to sustain life. He knew how to form us so that we could function the way we do. All the intricacies that "make us tick" that ...


3

There are at least two possible answers to the question. Some Christians consider the stories in Genesis to be allegorical, describing what God did in language and concepts that the original audience would understand. Since the original audience was neither aware of DNA, or mitochondria, this would have been a detail that obscured the message. Those who ...


3

Since Paul didn't expand on this, the best we can do is to review what noted theologians have said about this. To get some good answers, you really need to look no further than Bible commentaries. Bear in mind that the type of love here is agape love, which is also translated as charity, or selfless love. It's not speaking of romantic love as on "love ...


3

Approaching it from this angle: In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. So hell is not part of the original creation. We also know that [Now] war arose in heaven, Michael and his angels fighting against the dragon; and the dragon and his angels fought, 8 but they were defeated and there was no longer any place for them in heaven. It is ...


2

Disclaimer: This answer is from a Charismatic Evangelical perspective with Wesleyan soteriology. Is receiving the Holy Spirit the completion of Salvation? The short answer is no. While it is true that Ephesians 4:30 ESV says And do not grieve the Holy Spirit of God, by whom you were sealed for the day of redemption. Given this, it would be easy ...


2

I will take a different approach to the whole idea of hell than the catholic and many protestant directions choose to take and point out these things: Giving the devil his own place to live and torture people to enternity, because he rebelled against God makes little sense. That would be a gift to a creature who left, and started a war to dethrone God. ...


2

1 Corinthians 13 is one of those chapters that tends to be read at weddings and get taken out of context. Because of its association with weddings, many associate it with romantic love, and David Stratton is right to say clearly that this is not what Paul was thinking about. If you look at chapter 12, you'll see that Paul was addressing the issue of the ...


1

Isaiah 14:21 is not a commandment. It seems like the principle actor in each portion of this passage is God, not man, and this is certainly in God's purview. v 5 "The LORD has broken the staff of the wicked," v 12 “How you have fallen from heaven," v 15 "Nevertheless you will be thrust down to Sheol," The verses following 14:21 are a ...


1

By studying Christ's teachings on love, we can get a better understanding of the belief of love. He gives us an idea of how strong his love us for us in John 15, as well as guidance on how to love one another. He loves us as the Father loves him. If we obey, we remain in his love. He states we're his friends and that everything he's learned from his ...


1

I'm glad to hear you'll take non-Catholic responses. People tend to think of the lake of fire when they think of hell (or hades). Thing is, the Bible states "And death and hell were cast into the lake of fire. This is the second death." (Rev 20:14 KJV) A few verses before that it says, "And the devil that deceived them was cast into the lake of fire and ...


1

I have always understood it as being connected with the Mystical Body of Christ. If we endure, stay firmly connected to the Mystical Body, then just as Christ is the King of the Universe, we are also part of that kingship by our connection to Him.


1

To be in Christ is the safest place we can be. Outside of Christ--in other words, standing in our own merits--is the most dangerous place we can be. Paul tells us in 2 Corinthians "Therefore if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creature; the old things passed away; behold, new things have come. Now all these things are from God, who reconciled us to ...


1

Since there are tons of different places in which Paul uses the phrase, some specific references might help here. In Acts 24:24, for example, Paul refers to "faith in Christ Jesus." Faith here refers not to the pseudo-power claimed by the "word of faith" movement, but rather having faith in the testimony of Christ. Romans 6:3, on the other hand, refers to ...


1

You're going to find mixed opinions about what this means, but the most common thing you will find is that this is referring to Christ being destined to die for us since before the creation. We must remember that God is not confined to our perception of time - He is limitless, almighty, all knowing. He knows all things that have been, are, and are to come. ...


1

Jesus himself shows us that we should not interpret the Bible literally, but must always apply context ie. account for factors like genre, historical situation, cultural background, audience and author's intent. He cures a sick woman rather than upholding an uncompromising law: ...whoever does any work on the sabbath day shall be put to death. (Exodus ...


1

What made Hebron special? There are a number of reasons. Because God chose it! God's having chosen Hebron made Hebron special to God, and thus to David. God always knows best. Always. God sometimes tells us to go to go in a specific direction or to places that simply do not make sense to us. That is His prerogative, and our response should be ...


1

Unfortunately, there's no contextual verse where God says to David "...and this is why I want you to go blah blah blah." Therefore we must infer what the reason is based on the surrounding context and circumstances. We know, from the text, that David had just finished doing battle. We also read that at the time all of Israel was under one King, Saul, who ...



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