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11

"Jealousy" in colloquial English, means either (1) indignation in response to infidelity, or (2) covetousness of the belongings of others. We can immediately eliminate the second case, because God cannot be covetous; everything is his. (Psalm 50:12) “If I were hungry I would not tell you, for the world is Mine, and all it contains." This jealousy that ...


9

Two fourth-century fathers clearly make this connection.1 First, Cyril of Jerusalem: The multitude of the hearers was confounded;—it was a second confusion, in the room of that first evil one at Babylon. For in that confusion of tongues there was division of purpose, because their thought was at enmity with God; but here minds were restored and united, ...


8

The sword is an important symbol in Christian imagery, and does not always symbolize war and violence. In fact, the sword is a definitive symbol of the word of God. In the context of the passage you cite, history teaches us that the word of God is a source of discord among men. Consider these passages from the New Testament: (Hebrews 4:12 NASB) For the ...


8

Unlike envy, which is the desire for things you do not rightfully possess, jealousy is the fierce protection of that which is rightfully yours. As such, the premise that jealousy is inherently sinful in your comparison is not accurate. Consider the case of Phinehas: 1 While Israel lived in Shittim, the people began to whore with the daughters of Moab. ...


7

Hard Sayings of the Bible explains this simply: God's jealousy does not involve being suspicious or wrongfully envious of the success of others, or even mistrusting. When used of God, the word jealous refers to that quality of his character that demands exclusive devotion to all that is just, right and fair. Jealousy is the anger that God directs ...


6

Why did Christ say he came as a sword? Matthew 10:32-35 Whosoever therefore shall confess me before men, him will I confess also before my Father which is in heaven. But whosoever shall deny me before men, him will I also deny before my Father which is in heaven. Think not that I am come to send peace on earth: I came not to send peace, but ...


4

How do the early church fathers expound upon the “exaltation of Christ” (Philippians 2:9-11) in light of the immutability of Jesus Christ? The early church fathers uniformly believed that the pre-existent Word , by being the only-begotten from the Father, was and is fully God in essence (nature). “We acknowledge a God, and a Son (His Logos), and a Holy ...


3

I agree with gwofatlanta's conclusion and would put it in even stronger terms - it is highly unlikely that the servant in 1 Kings 18 refers to Obadiah. Firstly, "your servant" was a common polite form of address in biblical times, and it is extremely common for it to be used in this non-literal sense. Secondly Obadiah is specifically described as a palace ...


2

It seems more likely that Paul was referring to James the Just (Christ's familial "brother" or possibly a "brother" in name only), but we have no definitive way of knowing this. Some considerations: There is no agreement on whether or not Christ had a familial brother named James. Below is an excerpt from a commentary, "The Brothers and Sisters of ...


2

Balaam's second prophecy, from which you quote, may not be reliable. The context of this passage is the story of a Moabite king Balak and questionable prophet named Balaam. Consider the introduction to the story from Numbers 22-24. Numbers 22:4-7 And Balak the son of Zippor was king of Moab at that time. So he sent messengers to Balaam the son of Beor, ...


2

Now concerning virgins παρθενων I have no commandment of the Lord: yet I give my judgment, as one that hath obtained mercy of the Lord to be faithful. I suppose therefore that this is good for the present ενεστωσαν distress αναγκην, I say, that it is good for a man so to be. -- 1 Corinthians 7:25-26 Concerning this passage: It should be noted that ...


2

The answer to your question is hinted at in the scriptural verses prior to Matthew 10:34 (1-33) and in a tiny fragment from the NT that is the oldest part of the NT ever found. Matthew 10:1-33 These twelve Jesus sent forth... preach, saying: The kingdom of heaven is at hand... I send you forth as sheep in the midst of wolves... they will scourge you in ...


1

Probably not. This unnamed servant was left in Beersheba by Elijah ( I Kings 19:3). After naming Obadiah specifically and detailing his conversation with Elijah in the first half of I Kings 18, it would be unreasonable not to name him in the interactions with Elijah later on, if had been Obadiah again.


1

I regard this question and its answer so important that I think it merits some more attention and especially the implied question in the example given by Greg" "For example, are Jesus' words more important than Paul's?" A lot has already been said about the fact that the word "γραφή" or "graphē" can only refer to writings from the old testament. It is ...


1

Consider the man traditionally assumed to have penned Genesis - Moses (or a scribe like Joshua who wrote for him). Moses was a lawgiver who was intent on providing a reasoned defense of the Laws and customs he was delivering, so that the people would not revert to the religious practices that the Egyptians taught them. The basis for the authority of the ten ...



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