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Ehud was a Benjamite and the phrase translated "left handed man" is a very interesting Hebrew idiom. It literally reads "a man bound/restricted in his right hand." The same phrase is used in Judges 20:16 to describe 700 slingers (also of the tribe of Benjamin). These two verses are the only places where this idiom is used. Judges 20:16 Among all this ...


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To TEs who don't believe in a literal Adam and Eve, Eve being the mother of living is metaphor, just as Eve existing is metaphor.


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Christian Pacifism does not imply that one does not get angry. It doesn't even mean that one doesn't stand up against oppression. It only suggests that one eschews violence and use the least force required to achieve justice. When the Pacifist Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King marched or conducted sit-ins, sometimes there were altercations. People on both ...


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Some quick, important notes about your references before answering your question directly: Moses is not clearly justified in killing the Egyptian. He fled as a guilty man because he committed murder. There are many instance of men taking justice into their own hands, but this does not mean it was good for them to do so. God continues to bring judgment and ...


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There are some difficulties with the chronology of Christ's trial and crucifixion, so I definitely cannot give you a specific day of the week and say it's certain. John 19:14 (EMTV) says, "Now it was the Preparation [Day] of the Passover ...". The other gospels do not state what day it was before the crucifixion, but all four gospels do mention it later, ...


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RadzMatthewCoBrown asks: "What does the phrase "saved as by fire" in 1 Corinthians 3:15 mean? If any man's work shall be burned, he shall suffer loss: but he himself shall be saved; yet so as by fire." Catholic Perspective 1 Cor 3:15 is a standard verse used by Catholic apologists to support their idea of purgatory. They say this verse spells out that the ...


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At the time of the writing of Paul's epistle to the Corinthians, Paul had served three missions, the most recent of which lasted several years. He is speaking to those men who would be called to the ministry, and likewise serve missions abroad, traveling and preaching away from home and loved ones. He is explaining that it is easier for an unmarried man to ...


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In these "What would an Arminian say about..." questions, it's important to first denote what kind of Arminian you're talking about. There are 5 points of Arminianism: Human Free Will - This states that though man is fallen, he is not incapacitated by the sinful nature and can freely choose God. His will is not restricted and enslaved by his sinful ...


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We often let ourselves get trapped by not searching for other Scriptures which may help to explain what we do not fully understand. This particular scripture is complicated by the part following which denotes his following lessening, because they did not understand that Jesus was not speaking of literally eating his flesh and drinking his blood. Today after ...


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(LDS) This scripture is meant to emphasize that there is only one doctrine of Jesus Christ. “One Lord, One Faith, One Baptism” The word “one” appears seven times in Ephesians 4:4–6. Oneness and unity are important themes in Ephesians and in Paul’s other writings. Paul constantly preached about unity and prayed for unity among Church members ...


2

As an Evangelical (with Wesleyan soteriology - a particular form of Arminianism), my perspective is that we actually 'become' sheep at the point of Regeneration. Though our election to 'sheephood' was done in God's foreknowledge before the foundation of the world and the basis for our entrance to that state was purchased by Christ Jesus at the cross, the ...


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From a Catholic perspective: The Catechism of the Catholic Church has a whole chapter on baptism. It begins by stating the Catholic belief that Holy Baptism is the basis of the whole Christian life, the gateway to life in the Spirit (vitae spiritualis ianua [that is, "the door to spiritual life", a phrase due to the Roman Catechism]), and the door which ...


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Ecclesiastes 12:11-12: "The words of wise men are like goads, and masters of these collections are like well driven nails; they are given by one Shepherd. But beyond this, my son, be warned: the writing of many books is endless, and excessive devotion to books is wearying to the body." The writer of Ecclesiastes (Solomon?) in looking back over his ...


2

Short answer: no. He does not have two kingdoms currently. John 18:36 "Jesus answered, My kingdom is not of this world: if my kingdom were of this world, then would my servants fight, that I should not be delivered to the Jews: but now is my kingdom not from hence." (KJV) Jesus' kingdom is, for right now, not on earth. His kingdom resides in the heavenly ...


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Is there any explanation for this in any doctrinal belief in any denomination which addresses this? Jesus was explaining the limitation of the law. God's standard is holiness and perfection. Paul tells us that the law was supposed to bring us to an understanding that we needed a Savior. Instead many contemporaries of Jesus felt they had been ...


2

At least one OEC organization -- Hugh Ross's "Reasons to Believe" -- clearly states that they believe in a literal Adam and Eve. This article from their site discusses DNA evidence that there is a single ancestral pair for the entire human race. [N]umerous studies indicate that humanity originated: (1) recently (around 100,000 years ago, plus or minus ...


2

The Significance of his being left handed is not that being left handed is an important message. It is significant because it shows the utter deception in the assassination. Throughout History emptying the right hand and presenting it to show that it has no weapon, has been a sign that they come in peace, with no ill intent. That signal is still in use ...


2

Most commentaries point toward the idea that the individual loses all, and because of this, is convinced of the need of salvation. Put another way, trials and tribulations make the individual realize the need for Christ. They burn away all the non-essentials, and leave only that which is pure and true. Some examples to back up that answer: Gill's ...


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An Evangelical perspective: This verse should be understood in its context (the whole chapter) and a key verse for putting it in the right perspective is verse 13: their work will be clearly seen, because the Day of Judgment will make it visible. That Day will appear with fire, and the fire will test everyone’s work to show what sort of work it was. - 1 ...


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Which day of the week was the 'day of preparation for the Passover'? The key gospel text is Mk 15:42: The Burial of Jesus 42 And when evening had come, since it was the day of Preparation, that is, the day before the sabbath, Thus the Gospel of Mark clearly defines the phrase "day of Preparation" as "the day before the Sabbath." With the ...


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A Catholic Sacred Scripture Interpretation bruisedreed's answer has the gist of it. 1 Cor 3:11-15 (RSVCE) 11 For no other foundation can any one lay than that which is laid, which is Jesus Christ. 12 Now if any one builds on the foundation with gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay, stubble— 13 each man’s work will become manifest; for the ...


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I'm not aware of any Christian denominations who hold such a belief, though there may be individuals or groups self-identifying as Christian who do. The Roman Catholic Church, most Orthodox churches, and most Protestant churches, hold to the Nicene Creed as an authoritative statement of the core of their faith. The Creed states that Jesus was "incarnatus ...


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Catholic and Scriptural Perspective Answer The Old is the type of the New, prefiguring it, with the New revealing and fulfilling the Old. cf. The unity of the Old and New Testaments - Catechism of the Catholic Church 128 The Church, as early as apostolic times,1 and then constantly in her Tradition, has illuminated the unity of the divine plan in ...


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two things: in the account in John, it mentions that Jesus used the whip of cords (which is different from the "lead-tipped whip" used on Jesus in Pilate's courtyard) and used it on the animals to drive them out. in the synoptic gospels, there is no mention of any whip or weapon used by Jesus, but He did "drive out" the bad guys in the temple. even if ...


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There are two or three ways this question is answered. The first kind of answer differentiates pacifism from non-violence. Some holders of Pacifist viewpoint distinguish war from legitimate police functions. For example, this article: God may use state violence, [...] to achieve God’s ends. Further, if God uses the violence of the state, then ...


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The answer to your question appears to lie in a single verse of Scripture: All Scripture is quoted from the King James translation, unless otherwise noted. John 18:36 Jesus answered, My kingdom is not of this world: if my kingdom were of this world, then would my servants fight, that I should not be delivered to the Jews: but now is my kingdom not from ...


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Before we start building theology on this statement, we need to make sure we've understood it in its original context first, and that our extrapolations are faithful to that original intent. Who were Jesus' "sheep"? In Jesus' original context, He was talking with people who had not yet embraced Him about those who had already (at that time) embraced Him. ...



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