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17

Evangelicalism is not in itself a "confession". It is more of a general grouping of similar confessions. As such, it is a bit hard to pin down on a specific point of doctrine like your question calls for. That being said, we could paint with a broad brush and describe some of general leanings. Every one of these will be wrong for at least some Evangelicals. ...


14

Born-again protestant Christians are not "against" Mary of Nazareth. Every one of them accepts Mary as the Mother of Jesus, and while few would use the phrase, they have no issue with the concept of Mary as the Mother of God. That said, all but a few protestants, including nearly all who would self-identify as "born-again" reject most of the teachings about ...


13

This is at least one modern evangelical view... It is true that the New Testament really does not prescribe tithing, that is, giving 10% of your income. It does, however, prescribe giving: Each one must give as he has decided in his heart, not reluctantly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver. 2 Corinthians 9:7 The church at Phillip ...


13

It is problematic to spiritualize verses too quickly. Recall that the Proverbs were written by Jewish people living in the Jewish homeland of Israel under the Mosaic Covenant--not the New Covenant spoken of by Ezekiel and identified by Jesus at the Last Supper. This proverb is speaking about upright and wicked people living in the land of Israel at that ...


11

The "Evangelical" movement spreads across an incredibly wide range of beliefs, so it will be hard to nail this down, but a few things come to mind that ought to have broad acceptance and make at least some form of answer possible. For convenience in the rest of this answer, please treat the word "Evangelical" merely as broadly representing "Most ...


10

"Evangelical" is certainly difficult to pin down! The Encyclopedia of Christianity says [In America] it covers a wide range of not completely harmonious uses, from the Pentecostal churches to the peace churches, Missouri Synod Lutherans, Southern Baptist Convention, Holiness movement (eg Church of the Nazarene), charismatic groups (including Roman ...


8

The Practice of the Presence of God is one of a variety of different Christian "classics" which really cross denominational boundaries (Imitation of Christ might be another). Since the truths it discusses are universal to Christianity and because there is very little in the document which must be Catholic, its benefits are generally considered to far ...


8

Note that this doesn't apply to all groups that adhere to Sola Fide. Plenty of groups believe that we have no part in our own salvation, even in choosing to believe, but this is one perspective that's relatively common among Evangelicals. Short version: These verses are simply Jesus teaching on the true definition of what God's standard for "good" is. ...


7

Outside of the Roman Catholic context, genuflection is simply kneeling or bowing to show respect. There's no right or wrong time to do this; the Bible doesn't say we must be on one knee before we take communion, nor that we must not genuflect at any other time. In evangelical meetings, genuflection is sometimes used; sometimes as a result of an invitation ...


7

Simply put Evangelicals differ over at least three primary things: 1. The Nature of Jesus Evangelicals believe Jesus to be God - of one being with Father, God from God, Light from Light, true God from true God, etc... Mormons do not. Mormons believe Jesus to be divine, but a separate person from the Father. Evangelicals tend to subscribe to the historic ...


7

It depends what you mean by "once saved, always saved" (OSAS). That is usually a catch phrase of the Free Grace brand of evangelicals (Zane Hodges, Charles Stanley, et al.). That sort of doctrine is refuted better with regard to a James 2-type argument that true faith necessarily results in good works. The other brand of evangelicals that OSAS might ...


6

One of the founding ideas of Protestantism was "sola scriptura", meaning that we view the Bible as the only ultimate authority. That doesn't mean that we refuse to read any other books. The existence of thousands of Baptist bookstores should be adequate proof that that's not true. What it means is that we do not view any book other than the Bible as having ...


6

The phrase "God-breathed" is a translation of the etymological roots of the Greek θεόπνευστος. Most English versions of the Bible translate this Greek word as "inspired by God". ("Inspire" is derived from the Latin word inspiratio, which like πνευστος, originally denoted breath or spirit.) There is no consensus on what it means to say that all Scripture is ...


6

Protestants regard Mary as an honored servant of God. Generally they think the Roman and Orthodox churches are somewhat excessive with doctrines which are not found in the Bible and which place Mary above the status of a righteous person who nevertheless had faults. My apologies for those who are argumentative about it. Mary is a blessed woman who was ...


5

It seems in your question your assumption is that Protestantism is something akin to Contra-Catholicism. This is not the case. What distinguishes protestants from Catholics and what identifies different denominations both as protestant is the doctrine of Justification by Faith. If you take that as the working definition of what is to be protestant then it ...


5

A little bit of apples and oranges here, so if you don't mind me clarifying a few terms here. Protestantism In the West, most Christians assume that Protestant means anything "not Roman Catholic." Yes, we're ignoring the Orthodox, but I think a strong working definition of Protestantism would be as follows: Any non-Roman Catholic denomination that split ...


5

Much depends here on your definition of Protestantism. You don't have to be an expert lexicographer to discern the etymology of the word, its roots being in "protest" against Roman Catholicism. But while I know many evangelical Christians who disagree with Catholicism, I know very few who actively protest against it, or for whom Catholicism is "weighing ...


5

Evangelicalism is a kind of Protestantism. From wikipedia: Evangelicalism is a Protestant Christian movement which began in Great Britain in the 1730s and gained popularity in the United States during the series of Great Awakenings of the 18th and 19th century. Its key commitments are: The need for personal conversion (or being "born ...


5

I think the short answer that's easiest to give to another person is that if you really believe the message the Christ brought to mankind, it will change you, and that change will show in your actions. Not that you must do change your behavior to attain salvation, but that coming to believe what saves us by faith cannot but change your behavior. By ...


5

Pentecost, for Christians, marks the birth of "the Church." For evangelicals, however, church history generally means when their local congregation was founded. As a body of believers with no history, by design, historical holidays (I.e. Anything not explicitly about Jesus) fall to the wayside. From an historic viewpoint, the Church Universal is an amazing ...


5

For purposes of this question, protestants can be divided up into three main political camps: Those that align closely with Catholics, such as Anglicans, older Lutheran groups, and other highly-centralized and liturgical groups. This category tends to either vote exactly as the denomination suggests, or will discount religion in their voting patterns ...


5

As covered in From a Fundamentalist standpoint, what does the phrase "Inspired, infallible, inerrant Word of God" mean? Definition of the term "Inspired": The doctrine of the inspiration of the Bible means that the Bible in the original documents is God-breathed, that it is a divine product, and, because it is divine, the original documents are ...


5

Apologize for he length, the question is so good that I am answering not just for you but digging up worthy references for myself. A good place to start for an evangelical answer is with two evangelical theologians famous for having an acute sense of the sinfulness of man and the nature of God's grace in the Christian. John Owen and Jonathan Edwards both ...


5

Of course the answer will depend on which Christian tradition the answerer comes from, but since you requested passages from Scripture on the matter, here are a few to consider: Is Jesus your Lord? if you confess with your mouth Jesus as Lord, and believe in your heart that God raised Him from the dead, you will be saved -Romans 10:9 Do you live for ...


5

Perhaps your mind will be eased by considering the origin of the phrase, the blasphemy against the Holy Spirit. In Matthew 12:22, Jesus performed several miracles. The people were amazed. But the jealous Pharisees said, "This fellow doth not cast out devils, but by Beelzebub the prince of the devils." This is the remark that prompted Jesus to talk about the ...


5

Asuming that there is one objectively True form of Christianity, the mere existence of the wide array of beliefs, some exclusive and contradictory to others means that some forms of Christianity must be false. Simply logic tells us that two mutually exclusive things can't both be true. Therefore, it follows that if some forms of Chrisianity must be false, ...


5

The gospel never promises anyone with fake faith salvation. Rather it uses both encouragements and warnings as a means to preserve all the elect into everlasting eternity. This sort of question can be asked from many verses in the Bible because it rests upon a sometimes-unconscious assumption that ‘God would never warn someone of something, that according ...


5

The doctrine of Prevenient Grace is seen by those who adhere to it as a natural outcome of sound Biblical exegesis. In one respect it's akin to the doctrine of the Trinity in that it resolves apparent discrepancies. With the Trinity, we have clear teachings in Scripture that there is only one God, other clear teachings that Jesus is God, and others ...


4

faith by itself, if it is not accompanied by action, is dead. Doesn't this seem to say that since true faith is accompanied by action, and faith unaccompanied by action is dead, that the dead faith isn't really faith at all? From your comment on asfallows's answer: But James seems to argue that people can legitimately believe (as the demons do) ...


4

Of course when we see a tree we see God holding together, beneath the subatomic level, all the elements necessary for a tree to be. If God ever decided no longer to sustain the tree, a flower, a cloud, the Devil, then it would cease to exist. The Son is the radiance of God’s glory and the exact representation of his being, sustaining all things by his ...



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