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28

Note: This answer comes from the perspective of the Old Testament alone, since the question was in regard to the Ten Commandments and gives no indication that it's seeking a "Christian" perspective, but does give indication that it's seeking a historical perspective (since it references the Ten Commandments). History of the ten Commandments Why is rape not ...


27

Not every sinful act is spelled out in the ten commandments, but every possible sinful act does fall under one or more of the umbrellas. Rape is adultery as well as theft and envy and does not honor the Lord. That's at least four "counts". How much does one need to know that it's wrong? In the NT we find the ten commandments expounded to include thoughts ...


15

In one sense, I don't think we should be "pleased" that he is dead. God is not "pleased", which should be our ultimate example: Ezekiel 33:11 (NIV) 11  Say to them, ‘As surely as I live, declares the Sovereign Lord, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn from their ways and live. Turn! Turn from your ...


14

The commands God gave to Ancient Israel are normally divided into three kinds: moral, civil and ceremonial. This question and this question have more information. This one, and any of the others invoking the death penalty, certainly fall into the 'civil' category. The state of Israel (loosely speaking) would have the authority to impose the death penalty for ...


14

In the sermon of the mount, Jesus teaches about the sixth through tenth commandments, deepening their meaning. For example, "Don't kill" he expands to "Don't have unresolved anger or conflict". "Don't commit adultery" becomes "Don't lust". For "Don't bear false witness", Jesus says (not quoting one of the ten commandments directly, but a related passage ...


12

The most word used is "porneia" (πορνεία), and according to Strong's means "illicit sexual intercourse" - particularly fornication, or sexual intercourse outside marriage. This of course is the real point here - Paul isn't slamming sexual desire and intercourse as a bad thing - look at Song of Solomon. What he is warning against is sex in the absence of the ...


11

There are many different Christian perspectives and some may disagree, but it's arguable that at least a majority of Christians would agree that: A Christian should respond as Jesus would and according to what He taught: 38 “You have heard that it was said, ‘Eye for eye, and tooth for tooth.’ 39 But I tell you, do not resist an evil person. If anyone ...


10

The idea that "the ends justify the means" admits that there is something inherently wrong with "the means". Indeed, it admits that "the means" are actually unjustified by themselves. The claim, then, is that although "the means" are unjustifiable in themselves, that a particular outcome that is achieved by them results in the justification of the ...


10

When I hear Libertarians talking about how each person's only responsibility is to themselves, I tend to think of Cain. When God asked him where his murdered brother was, he flippantly responded, "Am I my brother's keeper?" (It's not my responsibilty to look after him! He ought to take care of himself!) I don't think most Christians would consider him good ...


10

Short Answer, No. 1. The model of Jesus argues against it In laying down His life for creatures he made, Jesus had absolutely nothing to gain. Being God, he is in no way contingent upon us. Despite this, he willing gave up the perks of being God, humbled himself, and became obedient unto death - even the death of a cross! Now, yes, because of this, at the ...


9

A few points: The "bunch of kids who made fun of Elijah's bald spot" were not a bunch of kids, (the KJV's translation is quite unfortunate here,) but a bunch of youths (meaning teens or young men.) It was Elisha, not Elijah, that they were making fun of, and laughing at him for being bald wasn't their offense. This incident took place soon after Elijah's ...


9

The answer is... "sort of". It seems the admonition against lying would be better explained as "Do not bear destructively false witness". While some might point to the ten commandments and leave that as their answer, saying that the rule is, "don't lie... ever" is easily refuted: In the beginning of Exodus, the midwives are told to kill the Jewish boys but ...


9

The "Just War" is a concept very widely accepted by Christians - at least in the sense of acknowledging that there are conditions when Christians are called to fight. Catholics accept it, Anglicans do in principle (though some disagree), so do Lutherans, and many Baptists. They may not all agree on the conditions for fighting a 'just war', but they do ...


9

I will try to answer the question entirely from a Catholic perspective, as that seems to be what the question demands. The classic determination of a moral act has three parts (CCC 1749-1761): Is the act intrinsically immoral --- which is to say, wrong in every circumstance --- by its very nature? Is the intention good, or bad? Would the circumstances ...


8

There are a couple of issues here to consider; one is the concept of creating a life form artificially, and the other is how it's being done. Regarding the concept, there may be a wide variety of viewpoints and several arguments that both support and oppose the concept. These include (not an exhaustive list): Arguments against: When God created the ...


8

I spent most of my formative years in a Mennonite church, and identify with the Mennonite concept of pacifism. So I will attempt to answer from a Mennonite Pacifist perspective, based primarily on my understanding, as taught to me by Mennonites, of this view (as opposed to my personal opinion on this view, which does vary slightly on a few points), and when ...


7

No, and this isn't surprising considering the state of medical knowledge in Old Testament times. (And it really hadn't advanced all that much by NT times.) There was no way to diagnose that carrying a pregnancy to term would put the mother's life in danger, the way we can today with electric-powered technologies such as ultrasound imaging.


7

Let's take the extreme example of Germans hiding Jews in their houses during WW2. (inspired by this question) When asked if they are hiding Jews, what do they say? Do they lie to protect them, or do they tell the truth knowing they'll be sent to a concentration camp? I can think of 3 possibilities: Choose the outcome that is the most loving. I ...


7

Matthew 7:12 (NIV) sounds a lot like the Golden rule: So in everything, do to others what you would have them do to you, for this sums up the Law and the Prophets. But it also says it's only a summary of the Law and Prophets, not that it's actually a hard-and-fast rule. The problem with your example is it puts "others" at odds with each other... There ...


7

Proverbs 6:16-19 These six things doth the LORD hate: yea, seven are an abomination unto him: A proud look, a lying tongue, and hands that shed innocent blood, An heart that deviseth wicked imaginations, feet that be swift in running to mischief, A false witness that speaketh lies, and he that soweth discord among brethren. There's no Biblical ...


7

I'd like to stand by by statement that it is an anachronism to judge the Scripture from modern biases. One of the first rules of hermeneutics is that a text cannot mean today what it could not mean to the people who received it. This is a simple enough postulate, buttressed by the fact that not every word of God was for every time, and that the canon we ...


7

The most important reaction to this should be that Osama bin Laden died without Christ, at least we presume he did, as he gave us no evidence of accepting Christ as his Savior before his death. 2 Peter 3:9 The Lord is not slack concerning his promise, as some men count slackness; but is longsuffering to us-ward, not willing that any should perish, ...


7

Its not necessary for a person to have a religion to have good moral codes. Hammurabi (1792-1750 BC) was a Babylonian King who gave one of the First Law in the World. The law was very similar the Mosaic Law, "Eye for eye, tooth for tooth". Exodus 21:24 Eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot, 25 burn for burn, wound for wound, ...


6

The old testament has a story relating to this question. Exodus 1:15-21 ( in my translation, available on Wikisource, And the king of Egypt said to the Hebrew midwifes, one of whose names is Shiphrah, and the second Poo'ah. And he said, "When you deliver for the Hebrews, and you saw upon the paired rocks, if it is a son, and you killed him, and if it ...


6

No, it is not compatible with Christianity. Consider this verse: Heb 8:5 Who serve unto the example and shadow of heavenly things, as Moses was admonished of God when he was about to make the tabernacle: for, See, saith he, that thou make all things according to the pattern shewed to thee in the mount. If we do not do things according to the word, it ...


6

If you restrict libertarian rules to the realm of governing and not personal responsibilities, then these views do not necessarily conflict. Ayn Rand would propose that it is everyone’s personal responsibility to earn what they receive which is hard to reconcile with the view that you should love thy neighbor and the Golden Rule. Sure you can help others too ...


6

During the medieval European persecution of witches, there were a lot of arguments about this topic: what is a witch, and what should the church or state do about them? Of course, there were plenty of writers that found Biblical justification from Exodus 22:18, and other passages. There was also an opposing side. One of the most important works from that ...


6

I would like to add to the ltcomdata's excellent exposition of classic Catholic ethical theory with a couple of considerations. TL;DR The Church condemns contraception—that is, impeding the fecundity of an otherwise fertile sexual act—because it is harmful in various ways to the persons (particularly the married couples) who take part in it. In particular, ...


6

Yes, it appears from the description that Jeremiah was not completely honest with the officials. They probably were asking about Jeremiah's prophecies, and he did not tell them what they wanted to know. Whether this is technically lying depends on exactly what questions were asked and exactly what answers Jeremiah gave, but it's pretty clear that Jeremiah ...



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