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18

Short Answer: The Book of Enoch is not Scripture. As such, the Holy Spirit did not lead the church to include it in the canon of Scripture. The Controversy Jude 1:14-15 says this: It was also about these men that Enoch, in the seventh generation from Adam, prophesied, saying, “Behold, the Lord came with many thousands of His holy ones, to execute ...


16

No. Enoch sinned just like the rest of us. He was taken to heaven because Christ's righteousness was imputed to him, just like it is imputed to us. Christ's death and resurrection saved all believers past and present, there is no need for any other explanation of righteousness.


13

Abstract The Jewish canon was still in a state of flux when the New Testament was being written. Therefore, early Christian authors drew freely from a wide variety of works, some of which were excluded from both the Jewish and Christian scriptures at a later date. 1st Enoch falls into that category. The early church probably held theological views ...


12

The best answer that I've ever heard was from Paul Washer who said this: Enoch walked with God for so long that when it was time to go home, God said: "You know what Enoch, you've been walking with me for so long, look we're closer to my home then yours. Why don't you just come home with me." We know that All men have sinned and all men fall short of ...


8

I think that the easiest answer is that it was excluded because it was never properly included. None of the groups who formed a version of the canon felt that this book accurately reflected Jewish values sufficiently to be included in the Tanak or the LXX. Christians just followed suit. Just because a book is cited by the Bible, that does not make for ...


5

Because John 3:13 says, "And no man hath ascended into heaven, but he that descended from heaven" (Douay) I am inclined to believe that they went to Abraham's bosom. That is the easiest interpretation of that verse without going through some severe theological hoops. Additionally, and this is admittedly out of the scope of the question directly, but there ...


3

Genesis 5:24 tell us a brief narration of a patriarch. Details are not available because the historical rigor was not important in the OT. Life and acts of Enoch were not mentioned by the author of the Epistle to the Hebrews (11:5), who notes only the faith of the Patriarch the price to pay to "not see death". We can take the example of Eliah in 2 Kings ...


2

Canonization has nothing to do with whether something "is" scriptural, contextual, or whatever. Canonization is simply agreement that a book is considered "most profitable" by most of the church. Even if you convince "me," you have about 2.1 billion more people to go. Two thousand years on, it is simply too late for the 'whole church' to change it. By ...


2

As far as the Bible is concerned about the Nephilim, it seems quite clear that they are annihilated in the Flood, but somehow they survive. The Flood story starts in Genesis six and seems to indicate that the Nephilim were a major reason for sending it. The Nephilim were on the earth in those days—and also afterward—when the sons of God went to the ...



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