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24

Faulty Premise #1: John the Baptist was a reincarnation of Elijah When Jesus asked Peter who people said he was, he answered that some people thought that Jesus was Elijah come back. Peter knew better and said Jesus was the Christ. In any event, John the Baptist himself directly denied the claim (see John 1:19-21). What Jesus more likely was saying in ...


19

In addition to Affable Geek's answer, I would like to add this verse clearly showing that reincarnation is incompatible with Christianity, Hebrews 9:27: ... man is destined to die once, and after that to face judgment...


10

Just because there was only one prophet does not mean there were no priests or followers - prophets were messengers from God, priests actually served in the Temple, and adherents, well, they adhered. In Isaiah, the notion of the Remnant God's select people who remain true even when most fall away is well understood. Additionally, it does not diminish the ...


7

It is quite explicitly mentioned as a miracle from God. How else can verse 16 be interpreted? For the jar of flour was not used up and the jug of oil did not run dry, in keeping with the word of the Lord spoken by Elijah. I've highlighted "the jar" and "the jug", both singular. And it says, in keeping with the word of the Lord. So this was God's ...


7

John 5:39 You study the Scriptures diligently because you think that in them you have eternal life. These are the very Scriptures that testify about me... A common refrain in sermons (and I've used this myself!) on the Transfiguration is that Jesus is being shown to be "the Word." Historically, Jesus referred to the Scripture as "the Law and the ...


7

Jesus is called "Israel" (Isa. 49:3) and "David" (Ezek.37:24), both notable patriarchs. Would you also think that Jesus is a reincarnation of both Israel and David? John was prophetically referred to as "Elijah." It has nothing to do with reincarnation. John 1:21 And they asked him, What then? Art thou Elias? And he saith , I am not. Art thou that ...


5

The Bible teaches that the Spirit of Elijah would be sent to the earth a total of 5 times (5 is the number of grace1). By Spirit of Elijah, I mean God's spirit anointing a man to bring a message, in the same way that the first Elijah was anointed (a straight shooter, hard hitter, come out of the wilderness, etc). First, Elijah Himself An examination of ...


5

Because John 3:13 says, "And no man hath ascended into heaven, but he that descended from heaven" (Douay) I am inclined to believe that they went to Abraham's bosom. That is the easiest interpretation of that verse without going through some severe theological hoops. Additionally, and this is admittedly out of the scope of the question directly, but there ...


5

According to Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament, Vol. II, "ascended" in John 3:15: "Equivalent to hath been in. Jesus says that no one has been in heaven except the Son of man who came down out of heaven; because no man could be in heaven without having ascended thither" (italics in the original). It appears that Jesus' emphasis was not the trip ...


3

According to some religions Malachi is speaking literally about Elijah coming to the Earth. Some Jewish sects believe that Elijah would come before the Second Coming and Wikipedia states that: In the Talmudic literature, Elijah would visit rabbis to help solve particularly difficult legal problems. Malachi had cited Elijah as the harbinger of the eschaton. ...


3

In Matthew 11:13-14 Jesus says John the Baptist is "the Elijah who was to come" before the Messiah.


3

John Calvin says (Commentarium in epistolam ad Hebraeos, translated by John Owen in 1853): Were any one to object and say, that some had died twice, such as Lazarus, and not once; the answer would be this, - that the Apostle speaks here of the ordinary lot of men; but they are to be excepted from this condition, who shall by an instantaneous change put ...


3

Jesus exact words were "Eli, Eli, lama sabacthani." (Matt 27:46) Eli-jah (literally YHWH - jah is God (El) of mine (i)) would be shortened as "Eli". Since they are the same word, in the bustle of a crowd, it is not at all unlikely that this "prophet" would be thought to be calling Elijah. Remember, just because the words were in Psalm 22, doesn't mean the ...


3

Heaven has multiple meanings: the atmosphere/sky, the realm of the stars, and the abode of God. What Jesus is speaking of in John 3 is about "heavenly things," in reference to God. He says that no one has been with God in heaven (to understand the "heavenly things") except the Son of Man (himself). The kind of closeness that Jesus is talking about is ...


3

It's really very simple. John was not Elijah by name or body, but the flesh profits nothing; he had the spirit of Elijah. Thus, literally he was and was not Elijah. Malachi 4 is speaking of John the Baptist only in the biblical phenomenon sense of dual prophetic fulfillment. The context of the chapter is actually about the time just before the great and ...


2

No, I think that It would instead means that It would be at the affected time a prophet like Elijah, not that Elijah himself will born again and walk on earth another time.


2

You ask for what groups besides the LDS have alternate views on the meaning of this passage. There is group knows as Branhamists (or by their own internal name of Message Believers) who, like me, believe that the fourth Elijah mentioned in Malachi came to earth in the person of William Marrion Branham. Like the LDS, this is a reconstructionist faith and we ...


2

I've read articles which interpret the word translated as "spirit" in Luke 1:17 to mean something like "motivational attitude" as in "team spirit." I don't think that is what Luke 1:17 means. Let's compare the language of Luke 1:17 with other scripture: Luke 1:17 - [Angelic messenger speaking to Zacharias] - And he (Gk. autos) shall be coming first in ...


2

John the Baptist was Elijah. But "spiritually." This was confirmed by Jesus Christ in Matthew 17 and by the angel in Luke 1. Matthew 17:9-13 (NIV)- "As they were coming down the mountain, Jesus instructed them, “Don’t tell anyone what you have seen, until the Son of Man has been raised from the dead.” The disciples asked him, “Why then do the teachers of ...


2

There is a vast difference between ascending and being taken up. Taken up as in the case of Elijah means that he was taken to Heaven by another power, in this case by a whirlwind. To the contrary when Jesus ascended it was own power. So John's statement is correct both Elijah and Enoch were taken to heaven alive: Genesis 5:24 KJV And Enoch walked with ...


1

) There are options Went to heaven Stayed on earth Went to heaven Elijah went from earth to the Heaven where God is, just like it is inferred for Enoch in Gen 5:23, i.e. they "died" (in like a very weak sense of the word) or went to heaven alive. Some believe that Elijah was later reincarnated as John the baptist Matthew 11:13-14, which he also denied ...


1

Fofole, I dearly love this chapter as for me, from my point of view, I see that this is a common strand that moves through scripture and has many functions in revealing Y'shua (Jesus) to us. At the beginning of this chapter, Elijah (My Elohim is Yah) is told by Yah that he is to prophecy to Ahab neither dew nor rain will come until I say so. Then he is told ...


1

The following is a Bible based answer. This is what Jehovah's Witnesses believe. Your question is a great case for letting scripture interpret scripture. The word translated heaven can refer to all or part of the physical heavens including the earth's atmosphere, outer space, etc. (Genesis 27:28, Proverbs 30:19) It can also refer to the spiritual heavens of ...


1

To understand this, you must understand what Elijah's mission was, what he did and also what John the Baptist did as Jesus said: “Assuredly, I say to you, among those born of women there has not risen one greater than John the Baptist; but he who is least in the kingdom of heaven is greater than he. And from the days of John the Baptist until now ...


1

Some theologians believe that Enoch and Elijah will come back again as the Two Witnesses of Revelation 11:1-12. According to Hebrews 9:27 all men must die once, or at least once. Since Enoch and Elijah are the only two people who have not face death yet, excluding those people at the Rapture (1 Corinthians 15:51-53), some theologians believe that they are ...


1

I think that the answer to this question must lie with the reason that Moses and Elijah, specifically, are here. From the earliest times, it has been recognized that their role is to point to Jesus as the culmination of Law and Prophecy, since Moses is the pre-eminent figure with respect to the Law, as Elijah is the archetypal prophet. Moreover, there are ...


1

I suppose if you read those couple of verses in isolation, you could interpret it as reincarnation. But we must ask, In what sense would Elijah return? As Elijah never died but was taken up bodily into Heaven, he could return by coming back from Heaven. Presumably he could be reincarnated, as you mention. Or this might be meant in a non-literal sense, that ...



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