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In asking this question, you have added a layer of interpretation onto the text that I do not see there. You introduce the word "want" which does not exist in the text. In fact I don't see any indication in the text that Paul has a desire for personal vengeance or that he wants Alaxander to get what's coming to him. In fact is is quite likely based on what ...


6

A better wording would be "Did Paul want God to repay Alexander the metalworker". For all we know, Paul is merely stating a fact that God will repay ("vengeance is mine, I will repay says The Lord") Alexander - but that repayment may or may not be "bad" ... it could just as easily be that Paul is leaving it up to God, and God may choose to save him. ...


4

This seems like an odd question. The only answer that seems reasonable would be that you read into Scripture the meaning you want it to have when you disagree with the actual meaning. To read into Scripture what is not there is to put oneself as somehow over Scripture as more of an authority on the matter than the Scriptures themselves. There are ...


3

The answer would depend on who you were asking. One man's "eisegesis" is another man's "orthodoxy," and it's not altogether uncommon to hear the former term levied as an accusation against any that disagree with a speaker's stance on any particular theological issue. The Westminster Confession of Faith, which many Christians believe to be entirely consonant ...


2

Perhaps Paul is saying that "God will repay him" meaning.....let God handle it. He warns them that he strongly opposed the message so they could not be harmed. Maybe one of the disciples was saying "let me at him" and Paul is saying "God will handle it.....don't try to handle it because of what he did to me." I remember once a girl stole my money at school ...


2

The sensus plenior would simply indicate that Paul was human. Ministry leaders have feelings, too! Paul is 100% committed, and when he gets crossed, I would assume he gets cross. Throughout the New Testament, all of the writers are forever on guard against false teachers. They talk about how much damage they do in the church. As one who loves his flock, I ...


2

Peter says pretty clearly that that's not ever a good idea: 2 Peter 1:20-21 20 Knowing this first, that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation. 21 For the prophecy came not in old time by the will of man: but holy men of God spake as they were moved by the Holy Ghost. So the scriptures should not be interpreted ...


1

I don't know that I've ever heard the term "eisegesis" used in anything but a polemical tone, so I suspect you aren't going to have anyone telling you that it's a good practice. That said, the exegetical approach that most Christians typically espouse (cf. Fee & Stuart How to Read the Bible for All its Worth), "The text can never mean what it never ...



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