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18

I believe that your question is very closely related to the one of "How could an omnipotent God who hates sin allow sin? If He's omnipotent, couldn't He have prevented us from sinning?" The answer to that, of course, is that God gave us free will because He loves us, and because He wants to be loved in return. Our love for Him wouldn't be real love if it ...


17

The answer to the question regarding the first book of the Bible actually comes from the last book of the Bible: And the great dragon was thrown down, the serpent of old who is called the devil and Satan, who deceives the whole world; he was thrown down to the earth, and his angels were thrown down with him. Revelation 12:9 NASB And he laid hold of ...


17

Per Genesis 2: 10 A river watering the garden flowed from Eden; from there it was separated into four headwaters. 11 The name of the first is the Pishon; it winds through the entire land of Havilah, where there is gold. 12 (The gold of that land is good; aromatic resin[d] and onyx are also there.) 13 The name of the second river is the Gihon; it winds ...


15

Good question because that scripture screams that question every time it is read. I don't believe that Adam and Eve successfully hid from God. How could they if God is omniscient? Hebrews 4:13 And there is no creature hidden from His sight, but all things are naked and open to the eyes of Him to whom we must give account. Psalm 139:4 Even ...


9

I like the Pulpit Commentary on this. It says that God called Adam because God wanted to bring him to confession. Adam's absence was a clear proof that something was wrong. Hitherto he had always welcomed the Divine approach. "And said unto him, Where art thou?" Not as if ignorant of Adam's hiding-place, but to bring him to confession. You can't ...


8

I don't have enough information to speak about the Southern Baptist Convention, where each congregation is a separate entity, and some could accept what the OP cites as the "serpent seed" doctrine, nor can I address the issues of the Assemblies of God. I do have some familiarity with the beliefs of the Methodist and Presbyterian Churches, and am a ...


7

On the surface, the teaching that 'the original sin' was Eve having sex with the serpent/Satan and that this resulted in Cain could seem to most Protestants to be bizarre, nonsensical and offensive. They may think that someone promoting such a line would be mocking the scriptures and Christianity and not be in any way serious. On further investigation, ...


6

The crux of this question is really How long was it before Adam and Eve sinned? The biblical record only has the following facts: Adam and Eve's first child was Cain, and the second Abel, by virtue of Genesis 4. Genesis 4 also suggests that Seth was not born until after Cain killed Abel, an act that could not have occurred in the Garden. Genesis 5 says ...


6

Well, let's have a look at the actual text. Genesis 2: 16-17 16 And the LORD God commanded the man, saying, Of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat: 17 But of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it: for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die. Verse 17 is particularly ...


5

Assuming it was a literal garden in the physical world, and not a metaphor, it was most likely somewhere between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, close to the border between modern day Iraq and Iran, or maybe the Eastern region of modern Turkey. Just Googling for Tigris, Euphrates and Eden will give you more sources you can probably read in a lifetime :)


5

This is an interesting question. The simple answer is that we are really told explicitly whether or not physical pain was possible. We do know, however, that in the judgment of Eve, pain is mentioned: To the woman he said, “I will surely multiply your pain in childbearing; in pain you shall bring forth children. Your desire shall be for your ...


4

At your suggestion lets take a longer look at 2nd Corinthians chapter 11. As with most Scriptures, it is extremely difficult to extract the true meaning from a verse or a couple of verses without considering other verses not only around that verse, but in other verses in the Bible which lend explanation to the verses in question. All Scripture is taken ...


3

I think this question reflects a common error in our thinking which I call temporal lock - that is, we have a great tendency to reason about the eternal things of God from a temporal and limited perspective. God is the great "I Am" - the eternal present. God's eternity certainly is more complex than time continuing forever; it's timelessness. God is not ...


3

The story of the Garden of Eden is only 3 chapters in Genesis. These should be read thoroughly, for as Walter Bruggeman said, one cannot over interpret them. In a plain reading, however, the sense is that there was no one other than Adam and Eve. The idea that there were others has no basis and nothing to suggest itself. Indeed, Adam was alone, and God ...


3

John Sailhamer proposes a rather novel idea in his book Genesis Unbound: The second chapter of Genesis provides a closer look at God's creation of the first human beings. We are told that God created them from the ground and put them in the garden of Eden to worship and obey God (not merely to work the garden and take care of it). The boundaries of that ...


2

God’s question: “where art thou” certainly proves that man’s position in relationship with God was altered from the original. Hiding from God does not necessitate that man was physically hiding, but more likely a spiritual hiding. We know that the "death" God warned against was not only physical death because Adam did not immediately die. Nor was Adam or ...


2

God planted the tree for the same reason he has done everything else on this planet. So that he might be glorified all the more. God is an intensely selfish God. He demands worship and honor and glory. He has created this world as a vessel so that he might be worshiped. He ordained the rebellion of Satan so that he might have an enemy and show his power ...


2

The views of Christians on this matter can basically be divided into two. A key passage here is Romans 5:12-21, which says: Therefore, just as sin entered the world through one man, and death through sin, and in this way death came to all people, because all sinned— To be sure, sin was in the world before the law was given, but sin is not charged ...


2

Your question really about the tree (to which I think screams being a metaphor) or is it about the nature of GOD and what his motives were/are? A very basic tenet of Christian theology and of what we know of GOD through the self revelation in Jesus is that GOD is love and knows how to love without showing favoritism or with any dubious motive. Would we who ...


1

How do you know how fabulous the Garden of Eden was? There's no description of it where it appears, and we have many places on earth that are just "heavenly" to stroll through. I believe the phrase is being used the same way we use it today to describe beautiful scenery. If the location of this destruction is in Israel (scholars are not unified in a ...


1

No they did not, here is the timeline as I see it: The commandments: Genesis 1:28 And God blessed them, and God said unto them, Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it: and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that moveth upon the earth. Genesis 2:16-17 And the ...


1

If we study the book of Romans where it teaches that sin is the outcome of law, it meant that eating that particular fruit of the knowledge of good and evil was not a sin until God made it a law not to eat it. It also teaches that where there is sin, grace is much more abound. As a Christian we all know that God is too wise to make a mistake and too loving ...



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