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16

From Catholic Answers article Does "no salvation outside the Church" include non-Catholic Christians?, non-Catholic Christians are specifically addressed in the Catechism: The Church knows that she is joined in many ways to the baptized who are honored by the name of Christian, but do not profess the Catholic faith in its entirety or have not ...


13

It is worth pointing out that even if you take the stance that the verse is saying that Peter had some kind of special stance. There is nothing that indicates that that authority is continued in his line. Every other place I can think of where a lineage related authority is granted, it is pretty clearly laid out by God in scripture. (For example the ...


12

There is debate on the actual meaning of verse 18, particularly what "his rock" is. Is it Peter? Or is it the Truth that Peter told in verse 16? Many Protestants believe that it is referring to the thing Peter said - that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of the living God. Jesus will build His Church based on who He is. Barnes' Notes on the Bible ...


11

Short Answer: Schisms in the church are the result of sin. However, God can use even the schisms to serve His purposes, by making a distinction between those who are walking according to His ways and those who are not. First, it is important to distinguish between "the church" and "all the churches". (Compare 1 Timothy 3:15 and Romans 16:16 - same Greek ...


10

Protestants typically interpret this verse to be referring to Christ, the Chief Cornerstone, when he speaks of the rock upon which the church will be built. Greek Grammar One reason for this is that Peter as a proper name for Simon is masculine in form -- petros (Strong's G4074). When Jesus says "on this rock", the word for "rock" is feminine -- petra ...


9

Calvin dedicates an entire Book of his Institutes (Book IV) to the Church, and Chapters 1-2 are about the "true church" in which he mentions the marks of a true church. From 4.1.9: Wherever we see the word of God sincerely preached and heard, wherever we see the sacraments administered according to the institution of Christ, there we cannot have any ...


8

The Church is holy, but it is an institution which is populated by human beings, who can and do sin. This can be seen in the first few chapters of the book of Revelation where the Angel catalogs the sins of the seven churches. In his apology, the Bishop of Rome is merely acknowledging the sinfulness, individually and collectively, of members of the church, ...


8

Most of the cardinals don't live (most of the time) in the neighborhood of the Vatican. So, probably, once the Church as a whole got over the shock, they'd convene the college of cardinals in some appropriate place and elect a new Pope. Now if (as Caleb hypothesizes in his comment) the college of cardinals were largely or entirely wiped out as well, then ...


8

The ecclesiology of Augustine and the ecclesiology of the Reformers were both very much products of the times they lived in: In Augustine's case as well as sourcing a basic understanding on ecclesiology from scripture and tradition, any development of his thinking in this area was greatly influenced by the problems the Church had been facing - especially in ...


7

I'm not sure if this is precisely what you are looking for, but your question immediately reminded me of Augustine's City of God: Chapter 35.—Of the Sons of the Church Who are Hidden Among the Wicked, and of False Christians Within the Church. Let these and similar answers (if any fuller and fitter answers can be found) be given to their enemies by ...


6

I basically agree with last two of Jon's answers (here and here), but I'd like to add some Catholic perspective to it. As Jon interpreted Chesterton, there have always been different groups in the Church, approaching on extreme or the other. Rivalities between monastic orders within Catholic Church show this quite well: opposition between Franciscans and ...


6

Christians who consider each congregation to have no higher authority structures than its own elders or ministers do not think that these verses suggest anything else. These were new churches, having just been started by Paul and his associates, but without sustainable endemic leadership, so they needed to be kickstarted by Timothy and Titus. Once they ...


5

In Catholicism, the marks of the Church are that she is one holy catholic apostolic these words are taken from the second part of the Nicene creed, which is commonly prayed at every Mass and the tenents of which are generally accepted by mainline Protestant denominations. I think, but have very little basis for this thought, that Protestant reformers ...


5

One claim is that it's a translation issue. "Peter" means "rock", so when Jesus says, "you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church" there's a bit of a play of words going on. Pretty much everyone agrees on at least that much. However, depending on which manuscript set you trust and your interpretation, it's a different word for rock for Peter's ...


5

Short answer: no, it's not a fair assessment, particularly in light of what the Church itself professes. The assertion being made is much like asserting that the Soldiers aren't really the Army, but that the Generals are. As such, it takes on the character of a false dichotomy and is a flawed premise, since the Church as it exists isn't an either-or ...


4

The other apostles are associated with other Churches. St Mark, for example, was the founder of the Church of Alexandria; St Thomas is believed to have taken Christianity to India; and so on. Only St John the Evangelist did not die a martyr in a far-off place (at least, Patmos isn't as far as India). Accordingly, most of the other apostles do not have such ...


4

Because although Christians cannot lose their salvation, they can still appear before the Lord in shame rather than in confidence (1 John 2:28). The good shepherds who watch over the flock want them to enter into the best the Lord has for them, and not be "scarcely saved" (1 Peter 4:17-18). Not all Christians will inherit a crown and rule with Christ; that ...


4

Reformed theologians, including Reformed Baptists, typically believe that the church includes all true believers of all time, both Old Testament and New Testament. This view naturally follows from covenant theology, which argues that there is one covenant, a covenant of grace, that has been in effect ever since the Fall. Let's review the writings of a ...


3

Nothing in Catholic doctrine suggests that the Church is absent of sin, nor that its members or clergy are free from the need for forgiveness. To the contrary, it explicitly teaches in various formats that all people are sinful. From the Catechism of the Catholic Church: All men are implicated in Adam’s sin, as St. Paul affirms: “By one man’s ...


3

The Church can exist without a pope. It exists during interregnums after a pope dies and before a new pope is elected; these interregnums can and have lasted years. Catholicism would cease if the institution of the papacy were destroyed; assassinating a pope does not destroy the papacy. The papacy can in no way be destroyed because that would mean the ...


3

If it were God's will we (Catholics) probably wouldn't pray for reunification every Good Friday! For Unity of Christians: Let us pray For all our brothers and sisters Who share our faith in Jesus Christ, That God may gather and keep together in one church All those who seek the truth with sincerity. Almighty and eternal God, You keep ...


3

Apostolic succession applies to all successors of the original 12 apostles. Every modern day bishop and priest (including the Pope) has been ordained by Bishops, creating an unbroken lineage all the way back to the original 12. This wikipedia section has it right, as far as I've read. In Roman Catholic theology, the doctrine of apostolic succession ...


3

What a great question. The answer depends very much on what church we are talking about, where you are in the world, and what we mean by 'require'. Let's consider the slightly different question: "Can churches legally enforce the collection of taxes for themselves". The answer is strictly no. There is nowhere in the world where churches can collect taxes. ...


2

Addressing your question of salvation: Is "my salvation as a whole, outside the Catholic church,…recognized by my trust in Christ?"No, the Catholic Church, in the Council of Trent session VI, condemns the Protestant notion of sola fide ("saved by faith alone"): no one ought to flatter himself up with faith alone (sola fide), fancying that by faith alone ...


2

That's funny to see that we all lack of information (see my answer which asked exactly the opposite, that is to say if some protestant church believed that Catholics were pagans). In any case, reading the already mentioned CCC 838 and also other paragraphs, it's quite clear that Catholic church believes that everybody can find salvation if their heart ...


2

In Orthodoxy, G. K Chesterton argues that Christianity consistently strives to balance two sorts of opposite extremes. He mentions, for instance, that our religion has been criticized for being far too weak and submissive while being equally faulted for promoting wars and anger. The paradox extends all the way back to Jesus himself: he was a lion when he ...


2

C.S. Lewis actually made an argument in favor of the division of the church - namely, that an institution with a single earthly head could be far more easily swayed by the Devil. By fragmenting the church, Christ has protected it from the deceit of the Evil One. Additionally, as Paul says in 1 Corinthians 12: 12 Just as a body, though one, has many ...



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