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To be clear: 1. Does she consider RCC herectical? In what matters? - The Orthodox Church considers the RCs to have left the historic Church (i.e. the Orthodox Church), having introduced the idea that one man (i.e. the Pope of Rome) has authority over all Church Councils. Later doctrines - such as the filioque in the Creed, the created fire of purgatory, and ...


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If an Orthodox spouse were to agree to a marriage ceremony in a Roman Catholic church (either before or after an Orthodox wedding), the Orthodox spouse would place themselves outside the Communion of the Orthodox Church - i.e. they would (knowingly or unknowingly) excommunicate themselves. If this was done knowingly, it would likely take a long time and ...


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Augustine is found on the calendar of saints of the Orthodox Church, although some of his teachings are viewed as simply theological opinion, and these are generally rejected by the Orthodox Church. For further reading, see Father Seraphim Rose, The Place of Blessed Augustine in the Orthodox Church, from Saint Herman Press.


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1917 Canon 1244 (1983 Canon 1244) says: It is only for the supreme ecclesiastical authority to establish, transfer, or abolish feast days and days of abstinence and fast common to the whole Church. 1983 Canon 1245 says: Without prejudice to the right of diocesan bishops mentioned in ⇒ can. 87, for a just cause and according to the prescripts of the ...


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Each and every one of the first Seven Ecumenical Councils are recognized as valid councils by the Catholic Church. No Roman Pontiff has ever decreed it otherwise. You will not find any Papal Bulls or any other decrees of condemnations on this point! In fact, any truly orthodox Catholic website will always list the first seven Ecumenical Councils in the list ...


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Within the Orthodox Church, there is no formal, centralized process for determining whether or not an individual should be included in the list of the saints. A good description of what is "required" is on the Orthodox Church in America website: While the glorification of a saint may be initiated because of miracles, it is not an absolute necessity ...


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The short answer is no. Not every saint is expected to have an incorruptible corpse. Although incorruptibility is recognized as supernatural, it is no longer counted as a miracle in the recognition of a saint (The Incorruptibles). Embalmed bodies were not recognized as incorruptibles. For example, although the body of Pope John XXIII remained in a ...


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I think the simplest answer, which @Ken Graham alluded to, is that we have no such title in the Orthodox Church. In fact, although the Wikipedia article cited is entitled "List of Eastern Orthodox saint titles", I would call these appellations instead of titles. There is no process for deciding, for example, who should be called a "Confessor" and who ...


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Your raise a lot of interesting points that are sources of great controversy between different Christian groups, but I'll try to focus on your question: What is an overview of the theological differences that led to distinct approaches to unwanted State innovation and overreach in the West and East? I don't think there really was much distinction ...


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Although you are directing your question specifically towards Roman Catholics, I would point out that Eastern Orthodox also believe in transubstantiation as you define it, although different terms are sometimes used. So I will also comment on your question from an Eastern Orthodox perspective (to the best of my ability, God being my helper). In answer to ...


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In writing about this particular verse in his Exposition on the Psalms, Augustine understands that those who tell us "Well done, Well done" are flatterers, whom he classifies as a different sort of persecutor: Two are the kinds of persecutors, revilers and flatterers. The tongue of the flatterer doth more persecute than the hand of the slayer: for ...



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