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I'm reading the Lenten Triodion, and in this particular version there is a forward by Archimandrite Kallistos Ware, where he states: Until the fourteenth century, most Western Christians [i.e., Catholics], in common with their brethren in the Orthodox East, abstained during Lent not only from meat but from animal products, such as eggs, milk, butter and ...


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I'm reading "A hunuger for God: The Sacred Discipline of Fasting in the Orthodox Church" by Fr. Peter A. Chambers. In part 1, Chapter 4 "The Development of Fasting in the Early undivided Church", starting on page 46: The text of the Teaching of the Twelve Apostles, written in the early second century, says, "Let not your practice be with the hypocrites ...


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Did Nero "sitteth in the temple of God, showing himself as though he were God" (1 Thessalonians 2:4)? Before Nero, was there "a revolt [αποστασια = apostasy] first," after which "the man of sin be revealed, the son of perdition" (ibid. 2:3)? Cardinal Manning writes: St. Jerome, with some others, interprets this revolt to be the rebellion of the nations ...


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I'm not a scholar, but as I understand it from 40 years as an Orthodox Christian: We as Christians must strive to become ever more like Christ in every facet of our lives. Being only human, though, we are subject to temptation and may backslide. So, while Sin is seen in Orthodoxy as "missing the mark" or turning away from God, rather than as a specific ...


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Yes. The Eastern Orthodox Church uses leavened bread. Leavened bread has always been used in the Eastern Church. In fact, at one point in time, a great controversy raged over the fact that in the Eastern Church leavened bread was used, while in the Christian West unleavened bread was the norm. (Orthodox Church in America) The Orthodox Church ...


-1

I'm Orthodox, but not a scholar by any means. I can only share how I understand things, and invite correction from the more erudite! The Sacraments, or Holy Mysteries, are asked from God, for the People of God (Laity), by and with clergy ordained (set apart from among us) to service these needs that we have (baptism, Eucharist, repentance, marriage, ...


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The question is imprecise. It can be read as asking the existence of Christ before His incarnation (which is about the divine person) or about the existence of His human soul before incarnation (which is about His human nature). If it's the former the answer is definitively no. Even Arius of Alexandria while denying the Son is of the same essence with the ...


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In Latin theology original sin does entails inheriting the burden of Adam's sin (in Latin reatum) referring to penalty (in CCC, stain of original sin) not guilt (lat. culpa). Therefore there is no substantial difference. People tend to conflate Protestant's original guilt into St. Augustine's original sin. With this being clarified there is no substantial ...


2

I'll answer your two questions simultaneously. Trinitarian baptism is canonically valid, always. Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, and Moscow Patriarchate within Eastern Orthodox communion accepts the validity of baptism under the Trinitarian formalism. Because the validity is rested on the formula not on the professed faith. St. Athanasius initially ...



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