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15

Prolegomenon There is an assumption that needs to be addressed before an answer can be given, namely that 'scripture' is the basis for practices and beliefs in the Eastern Orthodox Church. It is not. Scripture is a part of Holy Tradition (the preeminent portion indeed), but not everything comes from this. Most important is maintaining and passing on the ...


13

The differences are almost too great to list in an answer like this! The real problem in answering your question is that it isn't just a list of "things Roman Catholics believe" and "things Greek Orthodox believe". (NB that "Greek" Orthodox probably isn't accurate here: it's more accurate to talk in terms of "Eastern" Orthodox.) The problems are much more ...


12

Plus one for a decent, albeit unusual, question. After reading your question for the first time, I thought immediately of Jesus' words to his disciples in the context of His teaching on divorce: "'For there are eunuchs who were born that way from their mother's womb; and there are eunuchs who were made eunuchs by men; and there are also eunuchs who ...


8

Origen was a great teacher, but he also had some non-Orthodox positions on Scripture and the faith in general. His teachings were specifically anathemitized by the Second Council of Constantinople in 1553, which inherently means you can't be a saint, since you are condemned, at least according to the Roman Catholic Church. That said, he was also an ardent ...


8

Yes, there are lots of examples! There are still professional Iconographers who go around painting Iconography for a living! In the Orthodox Church the Temples are traditionally fully covered in frescoes. Here is an example: Since this is a great part of the Orthodox Church, there are many people who have been trained in this Holy Art and are going around ...


6

Is an English translation of the letter publicly available, and where can I find it? If you are talking about finding it online, you aren't going to have any luck. These letters, as far as I know, are not available to read online. However, if you are willing to spend some money, an English book compilation of the letters by George Mastrantonis can be ...


6

I won't be able to give a complete answer as I'm not that familiar with the Catholic and Orthodox church structure, but Biblical church structure is something I've been looking into recently so here is what I've found out. The Pope I believe the argument for having one man overseeing the entire church comes from Jesus statement to Peter in Matthew 16:18 ...


5

There are certainly modern iconographers. I have a small icon I bought in Walsingham (in Norfolk, UK), which is painted and uses gold leaf in the traditional Orthodox style. Not a particularly good photo of it, but here it is: about 8" × 5". And Sergei Fyodorov (b. 1959) has executed a number of commissions for English cathedrals: an icon of Saint ...


5

The origins of this tradition can be found as early as 120AD in the practice of fermentum, whereby a piece of consecrated bread was broken off and sent to another community in another place for a separate - yet now connected - Eucharistic celebration, thereby expressing the unity of the Church through communion. (The Roots of the Catholic Tradition) When ...


4

I assume that your question is not about the exact usage or origin of the phrase First Among Equals rather the primacy of the bishop of Rome. i.e., The office of the bishop of Rome is considered preeminent. The Orthodox Churches did not begin to assert this title after the Schism nor did the Catholic Church reject it after it. Both the churches always ...


4

It is called as Aër. is the largest and outermost of the veils covering the Chalice and Diskos (paten) in the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches which follow the Byzantine Rite. It is rectangular in shape and corresponds to the veil used to cover the chalice and paten in the Latin Rite, but is larger. There was the following in ...


4

It's probably important to emphasize here that Calvin, as far as I know (and I think we are in agreement on this point), did not believe "Original Sin" to have been completely absolved by the birth of Christ. Indeed it was also in Romans(9:18-23) that one of the early Calvinists' favorite quotes appears: Therefore God has mercy on whom he wants to have ...


4

Official Orthodox doctrine is covered by Orthodox Dogmatics. The good book on it is Orthodox dogmatic theology by protopresbyter Michael Pomazansky. All except written in the book, could not be treated as a real Orthodox Doctrine, but only as intepretations. There are no simply rogue theological opinion in Orthodoxy, except that is condamned as a heresy on ...


3

I know very little about the Orthodox church, but I am familiar with Lenten practices of other churches. Lent is not a time for giving up things which are sinful. Things which are sinful are bad for you, and should be 'given up' all the time. In other words if movies (or music) 'perpetuate sinful activity', then they should be avoided at all times, not ...


3

There seems to be a thin line of differences between Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy on the doctrine of Immaculate conception and seems to be in relation to the interpretation of doctrine of Original sin as seen here. I though find hardly any difference between these two views, after reading this article. Here this work however indicate that ...


3

Yes, for example, the vesica pisces is a newer invention. Sure some will argue that the fish has always been a Christian symbol, however the modern / Christian usage of the vesica pisces is not the same symbol used in the early church as seen below. vs


3

Firstly, you will need your Bishop's approval. However, before that (sorry if that is ironic), you will need to make sure that you have enough people in the area who would like to be in a mission. Enough people? Hmm... Here is a link that has some info. Quoting from it (member David): Here is how most OCA missions have been established in our diocese for ...


3

The churches your speaking about are all the same in faith and are all Eastern Orthodox. The reason they have different names is because of the ethnicity/culture of the Orthodox who attend that Church, but they are all united in one faith. In my opinion the ethnic denominational churches will slowly change their name to Eastern Orthodox Church because once ...


3

Heretic are they who restricting belief to certain points of Christ's doctrine selected and fashioned at pleasure. They believe not what Christ really taught, but the suggestions of his own mind. - (Summa Theologica - Second Part of the Second Part - Question 11) Schismatics are they who of their own will and intention separate themselves from the unity of ...


3

Air kisses are totally fine. The purpose of the kiss is to show reverence to that which the icon portrays, whether it is of Christ, the Theotokos or a Saint. Depending on the ethnicity of the Church you attend, you may see people prostrate (bow fully and touch their hand to the floor), or kneel down and fully touch their head to the floor. Some do this ...


3

I don't know if you've ever read Baruch, but it's the only instance of the word mitre I could find in the Bible Jerusalem, take off your robe of mourning and misery; put on the splendor of glory from God forever: wrapped in the cloak of justice from God, bear on your head the mitre that displays the glory of the eternal name. For God will show ...


3

[NOTE: At the time I answered this question, where the title and third paragraph now refer to "Eastern Orthodox", they formerly specified "orthodox protestantism", and my answer was tailored to the question as it then stood (that is, after the first revision of the question by Flimzy. Bruisedreed's claim in his explanation for his editing the question ...


2

In Eastern Orthodox Christianity certain paintings of Jesus or one of the saints are called Icons. Depending on the church these are venerated to a lesser or greater degree, and such veneration is rejected by Protestants. In and of themselves the paintings are not sinful, but if they are venerated that is considered sinful, just as veneration of relics in ...


2

As others pointed out Synagogue had painting in them as early as 250 A.D. But Catholics and Orthodox Justify having statues because God did not forbid Jews the religious usage of statues; He forbade the worship of statues. God commanded Jews to make statues, “You shall make two cherubim of gold, make them of hammered work at the two ends of the mercy ...


2

According to Wikipedia: The time and type of fast is generally uniform for all Orthodox Christians; the times of fasting are part of the ecclesiastical calendar, and the method of fasting is set by the Holy Canons and Sacred Tradition. Sacred tradition could mean just about anytime (well, within reason...), but I found some things on fasting within the ...


2

Your can read the whole chapter about this in "An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith" of saint John of Damascus (675-749 AD). He said: When, then, we speak of His divinity we do not ascribe to it the properties of humanity. For we do not say that His divinity is subject to passion or created. Nor, again, do we predicate of His flesh or of His ...


2

The problem with all these analyses is that they erroneously conflate the fundamentals of the orthodox faith with theological systems, theological opinions, ecclesiology and rules of the Church. The fundamentals of the orthodox faith as proclaimed by the first seven ecumenical councils are fundamentally the same as the fundamentals of the Latin Church (Roman ...


2

I would like to recommend what lonesomeday wrote, but with a few minor adjustments. Authority Part of the reason Orthodox do not like to pin down the question of infallibility is because it is understood among them that we live in a broken, sinful world. But the question of infallibility does not concern the Pope of Rome alone. A certain type of ...


2

Jesus didn't want Mary (and others) touching him as they had before the crucifixion, because he would no longer be with them as he had been. John Chrysostom explains this in his Homilies on the Gospel of St. John. [emphasis mine] Some assert, that she asked for spiritual grace, because she had heard Him when with the disciples say, “If I go to the ...


2

As pointed out in that question, the differences were originally in Christology. Generally the fourth-century Christological debates were about how the relationship between the nature(s) of Christ and the person of Christ. The "Nestorian" party held that there were two natures in Christ, the divine and the human, with very little relationship between them. ...



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