Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

I don't think I could improve upon the summary at the Orthodox Wiki: Objections on doctrinal grounds It is contrary to Scripture, particularly in John 15:26: "But when the Helper comes, whom I shall send to you from the Father, the Spirit of truth who proceeds from the Father, He will testify of Me." Thus, Christ never describes the Holy Spirit ...


5

Disagreement about the date for Easter goes back to the very earliest years of Christianity. Pope Anicetus and Polycarp are said to have disagreed about the correct date, as early as the middle of the second century, both finally agreeing that they could not convince each other to change. Irenaeus, bishop of Lyons in what is now France, mentioned this in a ...


4

I don't think there is any council-wide declaration about this, but most of the clergy will advise against such practices. To see why, we need to look into the traditional orthodox spirituality (hesychasm). The Holy Fathers put a complete and definitive set of spiritual practices which include fasting, remembrance of death, remembrance of own sins, Jesus' ...


4

Yes and no. The Catholic Church was initially considered by the Orthodox Church to be heretical, but as time passed and the term began to have strong negative connotations, the term was changed to heterodox, at least in official discourses. However, hardliners are still using the term heretic. In what matters? Well, the first one would be the filioque ...


4

The Chicago Tribune has an article that proposes some theories on why the observation of the supernova went mostly unnoticed in Europe. The article mentions the significance of the date with respect to the Church: Another reason the lack of records of the supernova is so puzzling is that 12 days after it first appeared in the sky, the Christian church ...


4

From a Catholic point of view, there is no problem with (a) a Roman Catholic attending an Orthodox Divine Liturgy and receiving communion or (b) an Orthodox attending a Roman Catholic mass and receiving communion. This is, however, restricted to circumstances when a Roman Catholic mass is unavailable. The Orthodox position is different; Roman Catholics ...


3

Christology basically, The Coptic Church (Also known as the Alexandrian Church) is part of a larger "[Old] Oriental Orthodox" group encompassing Orthodox Churches of Syria, Armenia, Malankara-Indian, Eritrea and Ethiopia - which are in full communion with one another. These do not accept the Christologies of the Arians, Apolinarians, Nestorians, ...


3

Yes this idea is found in Western Protestantism. You can find a (fictitious) example described in C.S. Lewis' The Screwtape Letters, where the senior devil is advising the junior tempter that "every time your subject shows real humility, show him that fact, and do your best to make him proud of having achieved it".


3

From the point of view of Catholicism, the first part of this question might be, "Why does anyone at all need to consecrate the Eucharist?" After all, if no one needs to consecrate it, then a fortiori it is not necessary for a priest to consecrate it. As usual, I went to the Summa Theologica to check out what the Church's greatest theologian had to say. I ...


3

[NOTE: At the time I answered this question, where the title and third paragraph now refer to "Eastern Orthodox", they formerly specified "orthodox protestantism", and my answer was tailored to the question as it then stood (that is, after the first revision of the question by Flimzy. Bruisedreed's claim in his explanation for his editing the question ...


3

Catechism of the Catholic Church 963 referencing Lumen Gentium 53 says, "She is 'clearly the mother of the members of Christ' . . . since she has by her charity joined in bringing about the birth of believers in the Church, who are members of its head." Lumen Gentium 53 The Virgin Mary, who at the message of the angel received the Word of God in her ...


3

Because it is Tradition. Exactly why the Tradition started, I don't know, but here is a present-day explanation for why to do it: In the Orthodox Church when a child is baptized they are also Chrismated, which I guess is similar to a Catholic Christening. It is for sealing them to protect against evil spirits and such. The Baptism / Chrismation is the ...


3

There will likely be as many different answers to your question as there are denominations. From an Evangelical perspective, I'd venture a guess that ecumenism is a "hard sell" in many Evangelical denominations of whatever stripe. (I would not even dare to give you a list of Evangelical denominations!) I happen to be a member of the Christian and ...


3

Yes John the Baptist or John the Forerunner is a revered Saint: he is considered the last of the Old Testament saints that went before Christ. There are numerous examples of iconography Saint John the Baptist icon and even Orthodox churches with John as their patron saint e.g. St John the Baptist Church, a parish of the Russian Orthodox Church in Canberra, ...


3

There is no obvious basis for the Assumption of Mary in the Bible. Mary is mentioned a few times outside the birth narratives of Luke and Matthew: Is he not the carpenter, the son of Mary... (Mark 6:3) Is he not the carpenter's son? Is not his mother named Mary ... (Matthew 13:55) Standing by the cross of Jesus were his mother ... (John 19:25) ...


2

Jesus didn't want Mary (and others) touching him as they had before the crucifixion, because he would no longer be with them as he had been. John Chrysostom explains this in his Homilies on the Gospel of St. John. [emphasis mine] Some assert, that she asked for spiritual grace, because she had heard Him when with the disciples say, “If I go to the ...


2

This issue gets super confusing, and you probably won't get "comprehensive." The one thing you got going for you is that if you ask any Orthodox Christian which calendar they follow, they'll have an answer for you lickedy-split, due to how divisive this issue has been historically and still continues to be. Okay. There is actually two distinct "new ...


2

I'll answer your two questions simultaneously. Trinitarian baptism is canonically valid, always. Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, and Moscow Patriarchate within Eastern Orthodox communion accepts the validity of baptism under the Trinitarian formalism. Because the validity is rested on the formula not on the professed faith. St. Athanasius initially ...


2

Wine and oil are both blessings from God: "wine to gladden the heart of man, oil to make his face shine," as it says in Ps. 104:15. We forego these with other pleasures on the strictest fasting days. With respect to wine, you are misinformed. In most Orthodox churches we abstain from all alcoholic beverages on strict fasting days. (The Russians seem to make ...


2

There are distinct differences in the tone of the two marriage rites of the Orthodox Church. The second is distinctly penitential, with the priest praying specifically for the Lord to have mercy on the couple who have come forward to be married a second time. An excerpt of the prayer following the exchange of rings during the betrothal: O Master, Lord ...


2

Admittedly I'm reporting mostly silence, but my copy of "Heresies" by Harold O. J. Brown mentions aphthartodocetism on page 185. He does not, however, mention anything about Justinian or any other emperor adhering to this doctrine. According to him: If monophysitism had not gone beyond Severus [presumably Severus of Antioch], it would at most have been ...


2

Yes. The Eastern Orthodox Church uses leavened bread. Leavened bread has always been used in the Eastern Church. In fact, at one point in time, a great controversy raged over the fact that in the Eastern Church leavened bread was used, while in the Christian West unleavened bread was the norm. (Orthodox Church in America) The Orthodox Church ...


2

Sounds like you are referring to the idea of the pre-existence of souls. This idea is lumped with "Origenism". Check this thread out here: What is " Origenism" This is an excerpt from orthodoxwiki.org/Apocatastasis: "The anathemas of the local Council of Constantinople in 453, which is understood by most commentators to be confirmed by the ...


2

The Nicene Creed originally had no filioque clause, which was a western innovation centuries later. The Creed simply said that the Holy Spirit proceeded “from the Father,” and the Council of Ephesus, 431, expressly forbade any alteration other than by another ecumenical council. The problem was not only that the eastern Church accepted the Nicene Creed in ...


2

For Catholics, one can read from the Catechism paragraphs 328-336. In terms of a guardian angel, we read the following, showing the Catholic Church believes children do not lose their angels: 336 From infancy to death human life is surrounded by their watchful care and intercession. [Cf. Mt 18:10; Lk 16:22; Pss 34:7; 91:10-13; Job 33:23-24; Zech 1:12; ...


2

This surprised me a lot. I was under the impression that church law prescribes when to hold a service, up to the time at which it must be held - but maybe I am mixing this up with the prescribed prayer times in monasteries. Or maybe there is really such a prescription for Orthodox churches. I grew up in an Orthodox country, but as an atheist, so my ...


2

In all books about dogmatics, ascetisism and/or mysticism of the Orthodox Church that I've read, or even web articles, there's no such thing as drawing parallels between the human sexual act and the Holy Trinity. In fact, the only comparisson of the Holy Trinity to something worldly*, that I know of, is made by Saint Athanasius of Alexandria: Adam is ...


2

According to the Catholic Church, your daughter's marriage to a non-Catholic, without her bishop's permission, is invalid; so she would absolutely need to marry in the Catholic Church. From the section "Mixed Marriages" of the Code of Canon Law: Can. 1124 Without express permission of the competent authority, a marriage is prohibited between two ...


2

The Catechism of the Catholic Church sums it up: The term "flesh" refers to man in his state of weakness and mortality.1 1Cf. Gen. 6:3 ["My spirit shall not remain in human beings forever, because they are only flesh"], Ps. 56:5 ["What can mere flesh do to me?"], Isa. 40:6 ["All flesh is grass, and all their loyalty like the flower of the ...


1

Did Nero "sitteth in the temple of God, showing himself as though he were God" (1 Thessalonians 2:4)? Before Nero, was there "a revolt [αποστασια = apostasy] first," after which "the man of sin be revealed, the son of perdition" (ibid. 2:3)? Cardinal Manning writes: St. Jerome, with some others, interprets this revolt to be the rebellion of the nations ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible