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7

I don't think I could improve upon the summary at the Orthodox Wiki: Objections on doctrinal grounds It is contrary to Scripture, particularly in John 15:26: "But when the Helper comes, whom I shall send to you from the Father, the Spirit of truth who proceeds from the Father, He will testify of Me." Thus, Christ never describes the Holy Spirit ...


7

The phrase comes from the Bible. It’s a fairly wooden translation of the Greek idiom εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας τῶν αἰώνων. Many English translations instead use “forever and ever” or something along those lines, which is more in line with English idiom. As for precisely where it originated, I haven’t been able to find any uses in classical Greek, though perhaps ...


7

The primary difference between the Eastern Orthodox churches and the Catholic Church is the refusal of the former to acknowledge the primacy of the Pope. This is a discussion that dates back well over a thousand years. There are some groups of former national Orthodox churches (the Ruthenian church for example) which have in the last several centuries chosen ...


6

In reality, John 15:26 supports both the Eastern Orthodox and the (Western) Catholic positions, because (at least as far as the Catholic Church is concerned) both positions are valid and complementary. (Note that Eastern Catholics—those who follow the same rites as the Eastern Orthodox but are in communion with the Bishop of Rome—continue to favor the Greek ...


6

Byzantine Modes What does each individual mode convey? What are the goals of expression? First, I have to explain one small part of the music. Modes 1-4 in Byzantine music, are each a unique scale, while modes 5-8 are a derivation of such, being called Plagal modes. Most often the modes are called 1st-4th mode, and then Plagal First mode, Plagal Second ...


5

Yes and no. The Catholic Church was initially considered by the Orthodox Church to be heretical, but as time passed and the term began to have strong negative connotations, the term was changed to heterodox, at least in official discourses. However, hardliners are still using the term heretic. In what matters? Well, the first one would be the filioque ...


5

Prior to the Russian Revolution there were two branches of Orthodoxy in Russia that I am aware of. The first and largest was the Russian Orthodox Church (ROC) under the Moscow Patriarch (MP). The second was a schismatic group called Old Believers (OB) that split away from the MP due to differences over Liturgical forms. They are not relevant to the ...


5

From a Catholic point of view, there is no problem with (a) a Roman Catholic attending an Orthodox Divine Liturgy and receiving communion or (b) an Orthodox attending a Roman Catholic mass and receiving communion. This is, however, restricted to circumstances when a Roman Catholic mass is unavailable. The Orthodox position is different; Roman Catholics ...


5

The Catholic Perspective I first ran across the word "spiration" in the discussion of the Holy Spirit's relation to the Trinity, found in Aquinas' Summa Theologica (First Part, Question 27). Aquinas has just finished talking first about God as an individual being, and then has begun discussing what it means for God to be a Trinity. He begins by talking ...


5

I suspect that John Climacus has Exodus 32 in mind:1 11 But Moses implored the Lord his God and said, “O Lord, why does your wrath burn hot against your people, whom you have brought out of the land of Egypt with great power and with a mighty hand? 12 Why should the Egyptians say, ‘With evil intent did he bring them out, to kill them in the mountains and ...


5

You answered your question that Mary gave birth to Christ, full stop. This same Christ who walked the earth and was the child of Mary is the God-man. Mary gave birth to the one cohesive person who is Jesus Christ. The second hypostasis of the Trinity entered her womb and took flesh of her and made it his own. This is called the hypostatic union. ...


4

Christology basically, The Coptic Church (Also known as the Alexandrian Church) is part of a larger "[Old] Oriental Orthodox" group encompassing Orthodox Churches of Syria, Armenia, Malankara-Indian, Eritrea and Ethiopia - which are in full communion with one another. These do not accept the Christologies of the Arians, Apolinarians, Nestorians, ...


4

Sounds like you are referring to the idea of the pre-existence of souls. This idea is lumped with "Origenism". Check this thread out here: What is " Origenism" This is an excerpt from orthodoxwiki.org/Apocatastasis: The anathemas of the local Council of Constantinople in 453, which is understood by most commentators to be confirmed by the ...


4

The Chicago Tribune has an article that proposes some theories on why the observation of the supernova went mostly unnoticed in Europe. The article mentions the significance of the date with respect to the Church: Another reason the lack of records of the supernova is so puzzling is that 12 days after it first appeared in the sky, the Christian church ...


4

One such organization is Orientale Lumen. As stated on their web site here: Started in 1997 in Washington, DC, these ecumenical conferences are a "grass roots" movement among lay persons and clergy to provide a forum for Christians to learn about the "light from the east." They allow Eastern Orthodox, Eastern Catholics and Roman Catholics to meet and ...


4

According to Catholic tradition, rarely questioned, the Roman church was led by the apostle Peter, who appointed his successor as bishop of Rome, and that Rome had an unbroken series of bishops down to the present day. At first, the bishops of Rome were not known as 'popes', but even the earliest Roman bishops could now be referred to as popes. According to ...


4

Well, I am not catholic, but there seem to be a question that fascinated and perplexed many of the early Church fathers. Justin Martyr addressed the baptism of Jesus, as a sign that He is manifested as the Christ, a sign for the Church first, and then the world. Now, we know that he did not go to the river because He stood in need of baptism, or of ...


4

I am a part of the Antiochian Orthodox Church. I asked my Priest this (who is married), and what I recall him telling me is it has to do with the fact that if you were allowed to marry after becoming a priest, things regarding courtship and all that are likely to get in the way of being an effective and focused priest. Whereas if you are already married, ...


4

Today, many Orthodox churches use a Revised Julian Calendar, which largely corresponds to the Gregorian calendar used throughout the rest of Christendom, with the exception of the date of Easter. The dating of Easter is seen by some, like Lewis J. Patsavos of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America, as the primary reason that Orthodox churches originally ...


3

There will likely be as many different answers to your question as there are denominations. From an Evangelical perspective, I'd venture a guess that ecumenism is a "hard sell" in many Evangelical denominations of whatever stripe. (I would not even dare to give you a list of Evangelical denominations!) I happen to be a member of the Christian and ...


3

Yes adelphopoiesis could be used to join multiple persons as siblings. It was also used for children who were ether orphaned or needed to be sent abroad due to war or economic calamtities (or whatever). They would have a blessing to make them siblings and have each others backs. The most famous case is that of Photius Kasavales Fisk, who was a U.S. Navy ...


3

This issue gets super confusing, and you probably won't get "comprehensive." The one thing you got going for you is that if you ask any Orthodox Christian which calendar they follow, they'll have an answer for you lickedy-split, due to how divisive this issue has been historically and still continues to be. Okay. There is actually two distinct "new ...


3

Yes John the Baptist or John the Forerunner is a revered Saint: he is considered the last of the Old Testament saints that went before Christ. There are numerous examples of iconography Saint John the Baptist icon and even Orthodox churches with John as their patron saint e.g. St John the Baptist Church, a parish of the Russian Orthodox Church in Canberra, ...


3

There is no obvious basis for the Assumption of Mary in the Bible. Mary is mentioned a few times outside the birth narratives of Luke and Matthew: Is he not the carpenter, the son of Mary... (Mark 6:3) Is he not the carpenter's son? Is not his mother named Mary ... (Matthew 13:55) Standing by the cross of Jesus were his mother ... (John 19:25) ...


3

I believe the correct answer is that there is no such term that has attained any significant level of recognition. That said, the largely unrecognised terms Ancient-rite Christians / Ancient-rite Churches may be suitable for what you are seeking although they wouldn't exclude Oriental Orthodoxy if that is an important distinction. We could no doubt ...


3

The Catholic Church did not used to allow girls or women to be altar servers. In his Allatae Sunt on July 26, 1755 Pope Benedict XIV explicitly cited Pope Innocent IV: Women should not dare to serve at the altar; they should be altogether refused this ministry. He also referenced Pope Gelasius who stated that women serving at the altar was one of the ...


3

It's a tradition derived from two sources: first of all, Jesus had long beard - second, from Leviticus 19:27 "You shall not round off the hair on your temples or mar the edges of your beard" However, it's not a prescription for ortodox clergy to do that: it's only a (widely observed) tradition Note that catholic clergy usually not maintain long beards, for ...


3

Hopefully this blurb from this Wikipedia article answers your question: The writing of akathists (occasionally spelled acathist) continues today as part of the general composition of an akolouthia, particularly in the Slavic tradition, although not all are widely known nor translated beyond the original language. Reader Isaac E. Lambertsen has ...


3

If you are using the word theologian in the traditional sense, I'm not sure if Frederica Mathewes-Green counts (I won't judge her) but I can tell what she has to say on the topic in Welcome to the Orthodox Church. I don't have the book with me or I'd quote it. However, she says the mind has two gears in which it can operate. In one, it is producing ...


3

The Bible's Purpose Archimandrite Justin Popovich lays out the reasons for reading the Bible in "How to Read the Bible and Why": All that is necessary for this world and the people in it--the Lord has stated in the Bible. In it He has given the answers to all questions. There is no question which can torment the human soul, and not find its answer, ...



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