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22

The idea that Jesus died on a Wednesday is a fabrication. It is nothing more than an attempt to force a modernistic interpretation onto Matthew 12:40. In the early church the common understanding of "three days and three nights" did not require "three full days and also three full nights". Fourth century scholar/priest St. Jerome explains in his Commentary ...


21

From this discussion, if "three days and three nights" is taken idiomatically, it means 3 days as the Jewish people of the day would have understood it. Now lets take a look at Jesus time in the sepulchre: Part of Friday = one dayspan. All of Saturday = one dayspan. Part of Sunday = one dayspan. Literally three days and three ...


13

I have heard this explained most often in context of the Jewish culture of the day. For Jews any part of the day is considered as representative of an entire day and night. Thus if Jesus was in the tomb any part of Fri, Sat and Sun it was considered to be three days and three nights. We do something similar, when we say things like "I was at the park all ...


12

Liturgy Brisbane calls it "Holy Saturday." According to the Catholic Encyclopedia, it is a day of both joy and sadness, and "in the early Church this was the only Saturday on which fasting was permitted, and the fast was one of special severity. Dating from the time of St. Irenaeus, an absolute fast from every kind of food was observed for the forty hours ...


12

It isn't... Or rather, they are associated with the seasonal event but not the Christian event of Easter.. Pagans and general common folk had celebrated spring with signs of new life for a long long time before Christ. Easter then became associated with the spring festivals (in particular, but not limited to, the equinox) in the same way that Christmas ...


12

Neither Easter, nor Christmas, nor any other Christian holidays that I am aware of are mentioned in the Bible. Many of the traditions we adhere today are, indeed, pagan in origin. There's plenty of material on the web to support this. ChristianAnswers.Net discusses the origin of the name Easter, as well as the Easter Hare (the original Easter Bunny), ...


10

The answer is that the theory that Christ died on a Wednesday is only about 300 years old, whereas the Good Friday tradition is nearly 2000 years old. So at the time Good Friday was established as tradition, the Wednesday crucification theory hadn't been considered yet. The Wednesday crucifixion theory seems to have originated in the early 1700s, and was ...


9

In regards to Passover, Jesus is closely identified with the Passover lamb. Exodus 12 gives the specific details on how to select the lamb and how it was to be used. 3 Announce to the whole community of Israel that on the tenth day of this month each family must choose a lamb or a young goat for a sacrifice, one animal for each household. ... 5 The ...


9

Paul wasn't talking about the Passover feast, but the original Passover that the feast was meant to commemorate. It refers to the last of the ten plagues of Egypt, just before the Exodus. God told Moses that the tenth plague would involve the death of the firstborn son of every household throughout the land of Egypt, and how the Israelites could be spared ...


9

The bee represents Mary, the mother of Jesus. (In fact, it's a fairly safe bet that just about anything represents Jesus or Mary or both.) Other versions of the Exultet text make this explicit; the "Franco-Roman version" has a long we-love-bees section, as recorded by Thomas Forrest Kelley in his The Exultet in Southern Italy (OUP, 1996), p38, concluding ...


7

Apparently, per Wikipedia, this date corresponds to Nisan 14, converting the date from the Hebrew Calendar to the Gregorian Calendar. I don't believe they're saying it happened on a Tuesday. In 2012, it was a Thursday.


7

Because all are symbols of new life, such as the New Life we have in Christ and the new life shown in Jesus' resurrection. (My guess about the chocolate is that it's an indulgence after Lent. ) At the request of a commentator, I will expand the "symbols of new life" ever so briefly. Eggs, of course, are where new life comes from. As one who has ...


6

Jehovah's Witnesses don't celebrate Christmas because of the pagan origins of many of our current customs. They cover this in several articles on their site. A search of their site returns many, but here is the first. They also reject several other holidays, citing similar reasons. Several other denominations have similar beliefs, and even within ...


6

The BBC has quite a good critique on the subject. It is of course a convenient way of getting good quality ash, but there is a theological significance. The Palm Sunday palms symbolise Christ's triumphant entry into Jerusalem, and converting them into ash is a reminder that defeat and crucifixion followed soon after. The ashing is a mark of penitence, and ...


6

The phrasing of Matthew 12:40 is an anomaly. The bulk of the New Testament testimony is that Jesus was resurrected, not after three days but on the third day: Matthew 16:21 ...and on the third day be raised. Matthew 17:32 ...and on the third day he will be raised. Luke 9:22 ...and on the third day be raised. Luke 18:33 ...and on the third ...


6

I think that Biblically the Good Friday tradition doesn't stand up to scrutiny. The traditional view tends to forget that since it was Passover there would be an additional Sabbath in the chronology. We can see a hint of this in the difference between Mark 16:1 and Luke 23:55 regarding the purchasing of spices by the women. See this website for a detailed ...


6

Three Days and Three Nights says being in the heart of the earth doesn't mean being dead in the grave, but rather being controlled by the world, so the three days and three nights began when the Son of Man was betrayed into the hands of sinners. The Heart of the Earth So the phrase “in the heart of the earth” can easily be translated as “in the midst of ...


5

In the Roman Catholic Church, the first eight days of the Easter Season make up the Octave of Easter and are celebrated as Solemnities of the Lord according to General Norms for the Liturgical Year and Calendar. http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/view.cfm?id=5932#Easter As each of those days is a Feast of the first order, fasting is clearly ...


4

They're not kept full all year long, there is a blessing concerning Holy Water that takes place solely during the Triduum. But that is not the water kept in the font. There is a fairly erroneous Catholic tradition that some priests take part in where they dump all the Holy Water before Lent starts then fill them back up when Easter comes around. What we ...


4

In harmony with Jesus command to "Keep doing this in remembrance of me", we observe the memorial of Jesus death every year on Nisan 14 after sundown. (Luke 22:19) This does not always fall on the same day of the week for us. Jesus death occurred on Nisan 14 of the Jewish calendar that was common during the first century. Since the Jewish day begins and ends ...


3

All denominations, as far as I'm aware, agree that John 19 places the crucifixion on Nisan 14. John 19:14 is clear that this was "the day of Preparation for the Passover," that is, the day the sacrificial lambs were slain before the Passover feast officially began (see Exodus 12:5-6). Since Passover begins on Nisan 15, Preparation Day is the 14th. The ...


3

Typically, yes, most denominations how special services on Christmas eve, and some, possibly, on Christmas day. (More details coming.) In Catholic Churches, there is the Midnight Mass. There's also Christmas Vespers for several denominations including the Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodox, Lutheran, and Anglican Churches. The LDS Church has some unique ...


2

If Jesus had meant that he was going to be in the earth for anything less than "three days and three nights" He would have not used such specific vernacular. In Genesis 1:5 NLT God explains "God called the light "day" and the darkness "night". Together these made up one 24-hour day." In as much as Jesus rose on the 'third day' while it was still dark, one ...


2

I believe that God has not given us an answer to this question as it might lead to a form of idolatry. I remember standing in the Princeton Cemetery at the foot of Jonathan Edward's grave (he is one of my heros of the faith) and thinking, my goodness, this is where that godly man's bones rest until the resurrection. I was so tempted to worship the place I ...


2

Taking a step back from Christmas and Easter holiday celebrations in particular, it should be noted that there were several celebratory feasts (and trust me, as a former Baptist, feasts are crucial to Baptists too) that the Jews undertook. In fact Deuteronomy 14 records an obligatory feast in which Jews were required to take a tenth of their possessions, ...


2

is the intention to add fish to the diet or to remove all other meats from the diet? The answer is "Neither". The intention is to remind you of your need for, and dependence on God. Abstaining from meat is a specific example of the teaching on Abstinence. The Catholic Encyclopedia explains the purpose of abstinence in general as follows: ...


2

In short, if you recall the Passover was a celebration of the memorial of The Angel of Death 'passing over' the houses whose doorframes (wooden frames) were stained with the blood of the Passover Lamb. Inasmuch as Jesus' death does the same, that is, causes death to 'pass over' those that are marked with his blood, he is in effect 'our passover' both in the ...


2

I want to expand a bit on the other good answers already given. Slavery One of the first things to note is the state of the people of Israel at the time. They were enslaved to Egypt. So they ruthlessly made the people of Israel work as slaves 14 and made their lives bitter with hard service, in mortar and brick, and in all kinds of work in the ...


1

In Exodus 12, the Hebrews celebrated the Passover on the 14th day of the first month of the year, it is called Abib in Hebrew (like January in our calendar today). After coming back from the Babylonian exile, they call Abib by a Babylonian name which is Nisan. So Abib 14 or Nisan 14 every year is the day of the Passover. Fast forward to the time of Jesus, ...



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