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16

The clear and correct answer is simply: God's will. God ensured that it happened. Now, suppose one rephrased the question as: how could one explain the survival of Christianity in purely athiest terms -- with no mention of God whatsoever -- what is the closest approximation one could do? Measuring love in units of sacrifice. There's something ...


15

The word tithe itself comes from the Old English teogoþa, meaning "tenth" - so technically, tithing is the giving of a tenth by definition. But of course that's not what you're asking! The idea of giving a tenth comes from the Old Testament: Leviticus 27:30-33 (MSG): "A tenth of the land's produce, whether grain from the ground or fruit from the ...


15

Quick answer: Yes, nude baptism was practiced in Ancient times. From A Dictionary of Christian Antiquities p 160 ed W Smith & S Cheetam (1875) A comparison of all the evidence leads to the conclusion that the catechumens entered the font in a state of absolute nakedness. See particularly St Cyril, Hieros. Myst. Catech. ii ad init; St Ambrose, Serm. ...


14

1. The Jews persecuted Christians for Blasphemy From the perspective of the High Priest, the followers of the Way were violating the primary profession of the Jewish Faith: "Hear O Israel, the Lord your God is One." Jesus, in claiming to be God, was, according to the High Priest, blaspheming. Those who followed him would, to the Jewish mind, have been ...


12

The group you're referring to is known as the Apostolic Fathers. The exact number is unknown, because some writings cannot be dated precisely. These writings we can say with some confidence are from the Apostolic Fathers: 1 Clement, a letter written by Clement of Rome, a disciple of Peter. He may also be the same Clement mentioned by Paul in Philippians ...


12

In Acts 2:1, it is written, And when the day of Pentecost was fully come, they were all together with one accord (ὁμοθυμαδὸν). καὶ ἐν τῷ συμπληροῦσθαι τὴν ἡμέραν τῆς πεντηκοστῆς ἦσαν ἅπαντες ὁμοθυμαδὸν ἐπὶ τὸ αὐτό We see that the first Christians were all together with one accord in the Temple at the time they received the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:4). ...


11

The writings of the early Christians make it clear that Christians abandoned the Jewish custom of worship on the Sabbath (seventh day) and instead held the first day, which they called the Lord's Day, to be the sacred day of worship. One of the simplest explanations on the subject comes from Tertullian, around 200 AD: But why is it, you ask, that we ...


11

It's from Jerome's Commentary on Galatians, 6:10: The blessed John the Evangelist lived in Ephesus until extreme old age. His disciples could barely carry him to church and he could not muster the voice to speak many words. During individual gatherings he usually said nothing but, "Little children, love one another." The disciples and brothers in ...


10

No, there is no reliable historical evidence to support such a claim. Before going into the question significantly, I should point out that the number of Baptists killed by the Catholic Church depends on how one defines "Baptist" - apparently, there are some who consider any early sect of Christianity which did not practice infant baptism to be a ...


10

It is impossible to know for sure without asking the person that said it, but I believe it is most likely, given her description of the individual in question, the historical time frame and the context of the discussion, that she was speaking of a man named Marcion. Who was Marcion? For the first hundred years or so of the Christian faith, documents ...


9

A satisfactory answer requires that we examine the development of the Apostles' Creed through history. We'll deal with the question in three parts: Does today's version match that of the apostles? Does any version come from the apostles? When did today's version first appear? Does the current form of the creed come from the apostles? The strongest ...


9

It was a creed that was developed by the early church. It came into existence after the age of the apostles. However, it finds its biblical basis in the apostles. The Theopedia article says "its current form" is "more likely post-Nicene Creed in the early 4th Century AD." The Wikipedia article indicates it was a later form of the Old Roman Creed. The ...


9

From this article, The reason they were baptizing "in the name of Jesus" is not because it was a formula, but because the phrase, "in the name of" means "in the authority of. They were baptizing with his authority. They were using his authority to baptize believers into a new life. Another quote from that same site: Therefore, when someone is ...


9

It is a fairly natural idea to have somebody fulfilling this role, and various Christian traditions have done just that. The following are from Worship music: a concise dictionary (ed. Edward Foley, 2000): Cantor [Latin]. "Singer" (1) In Christianity, a 5th-century term for the psalmist; later, the medieval singer (often cleric) who intoned and led the ...


9

The claim is false... Strictly speaking, the claim is easily proven false by searching a scripture index of the writings of the Ante-Nicene Fathers. While this particular index seems imperfect, it does show that many verses (particularly from the shorter letters) are not quoted or even referenced. We can also take advantage of the Philip Schaff ...


9

As far as we can tell, Christian twice-weekly fasting was based on Jewish twice-weekly fasting. Given the later tension between Jews and Christians, this makes an early adoption date likely. Further evidence comes from the Didache (dating probably to the first century): Your fasts should not be with the hypocrites, for they fast on Mondays and ...


8

Early Christians: Epistle of Barnabas (70 - 130 AD): The way of darkness is crooked, and it is full of cursing. It is the way of eternal death with punishment. (“Epistle of Barnabas”) Ignatius of Antioch (110 AD): Corrupters of families will not inherit the kingdom of God. And if they who do these things according to the flesh suffer death. ...


8

Luke 2 tells the story of Jesus as a boy in the Temple. His parents had taken Him to a feast there and had left Him behind on their return trip. When they returned to Jerusalem to find Him, Jesus asks His mother a question--"Did you not know that I must be in my Father's house?" Now, the Temple was not where Joseph lived, but was the House of God. So, ...


8

The Didache: The Teaching of the Twelve Apostles Chapter 7. Concerning Baptism. And concerning baptism, baptize this way: Having first said all these things, baptize into the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, in living water. But if you have no living water, baptize into other water; and if you cannot do so in cold water, do so ...


8

Before I can answer, I must clarify several terms that you are using incorrectly/ambiguously and define how I will approach this question. I also must begin with the disclaimer that I will be answering from an Eastern Orthodox perspective. Eastern Orthodox vs. Oriental 'Orthodox' vs. Nestorianism Nestorianism was condemned at the third and fourth ...


8

This question is based on a faulty premise - namely that any individual "suppressed" any book in the canonization process. To say that a book was "discredited" or "suppressed" from the canon is akin to saying that "Fifty Shades of Grey" was "discredited" from the NY Times Best Seller List, or that the kid with an SAT in the 80th percentile was 'suppressed' ...


8

I would guess that the reference to the synagogue of Satan is not to some local synagogue of Satanists that were pretending to be Jews, but instead to all those everywhere who claimed to be Jews but were not really, spiritually, Jews. Consider Jesus' words in John 8: They answered him, “Abraham is our father.” Jesus said to them, “If you were Abraham's ...


7

There is an excellent written words in this page on "No one that lacked..." section. Acts 4:34 says that “there was not a needy person among them” due to distribution of the proceeds of the sale of houses and land. Now, as stated above, we don’t know how long this arrangement continued. However, by the end of the eleventh chapter, there were certainly ...


7

Most Churches will likely follow the words given by Jesus in Matt 28:19 than the Acts of the Apostles, and therefore "...baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit". Special mention should be given to the Apostolic Church, Apostolic traditions etc. who are more likely to baptise, as you say, in the name of Jesus. For some ...


7

According to this source, women were not even allowed to be taught the Torah publicly in the Jewish faith, so they were not able to even sit in the same area as the men who were taught from the scriptures. Restrictions applied to any public reading of Scripture in the Synagogue (Megillot 73a) and they were unable to pronounce the benediction after a ...


7

I'm not sure if this is precisely what you are looking for, but your question immediately reminded me of Augustine's City of God: Chapter 35.—Of the Sons of the Church Who are Hidden Among the Wicked, and of False Christians Within the Church. Let these and similar answers (if any fuller and fitter answers can be found) be given to their enemies by ...


7

There are a number of reasons Christianity survived in the face of persecution. First, Christianity began at a time when the Romans were working to make it easy to travel throughout the Mediterranean, in order to facilitate management of their growing empire. Paul and other early missionaries were therefore able to spread the gospel faster than any religion ...


7

A great deal of early Church art showed baptism being done in the nude. This would not have been shocking in the world of the early Church, as many early Christians were slaves. Most slaves in the Roman world owned no more than one garment, and many were given no clothing at all, particularly those who mainly performed hard physical labor. Below are some ...



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