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14

I think Jonathon started with a great passage for this question, but stopped short of an interpretation that carries the full weight of the passage. The passage has two different parts. One part addresses marriages between believers, the other mixed marriages. First, let's take the part between believers: 1st Corinthians 7:10-11 (ESV) To the married ...


11

I think there are two basic answers to your question. The first, and simple answer is: Many Protestant churches do not allow divorce. Some congregations deny membership rights to people who are divorced. The more direct, and also more complex, answer to your question is: Many protestant churches permit divorce because there is simply nothing they can ...


11

Some Christians would say that the abusiveness of the husband is proof that he is not a Christian, and the wife is therefore able to divorce him based on Paul's words in 1st Corinthians 7. The key point is in bold. 1 Corinthians 7:10-15 ESV To the married I give this charge (not I, but the Lord): the wife should not separate from her husband (but if she ...


10

Good question! In the New American Bible (Revised Edition), which is the translation authorized by the U.S. Council of Catholic Bishops for use in the United States, Matt. 19:9 reads: I say to you, whoever divorces his wife (unless the marriage is unlawful) and marries another commits adultery. (Note: you don't specify which translation you're using; ...


9

As Matthew 19:18 states, Jesus replied, "Moses permitted you to divorce your wives because your hearts were hard. But it was not this way from the beginning. Jesus is clearly pointing out that divorce is, in fact, legal. It is bad, but it is permissible. To turn it into an iron-clad law is then much like laws concerning the Sabbath - Jesus values the ...


9

The short answer is "no," an annulment is not a Catholic divorce. Although the term "annulment" has come into common use, it is somewhat misleading, since it makes it seem as if an existing marriage is "annulled" or "cancelled." In fact, Church law does not use that term, but instead contemplates a declaration of the nullity (or non-existence) of a ...


8

A catholic within the parameters set by the Magestarium can interpret this verse in the following ways: Sexual immorality can be a valid reason for civil divorce. But such divorced couples cannot remarry. The word used in Matthew 19:9 for sexual immorality is: porneia. This word can also mean marriage with close relatives. (Ordinary Greek word for adultery ...


7

This is a difficult question of Christian practice. How do you deal with marriages that fail? It's easy to be consistent. It's very easy to point to scriptural sayings and say "Jesus disapproves" and consider that the end of the matter. It's easy to say something is sinful and should be forbidden. It's even easy to ostracise those who are divorced, ...


6

As usual the Catholic Encyclopedia is helpful here. The Catholic doctrine on divorce may be summed up in the following propositions: In Christian marriage, which implies the restoration, by Christ Himself, of marriage to its original indissolubility, there can never be an absolute divorce, at least after the marriage has been consummated; ...


6

From Roman Cholij's Priestly celibacy in patristics and in the history of the Church: Although perhaps strange to our own modern ways of thinking, absolute marital continence was far from unknown or unesteemed in patristic times. Tertullian, himself a married man, informs us in his Catholic period, of lay people who practise continence within marriage ...


5

It is worth noting that while divorce was not part of God's original intent / design, for those who were determined to divorce, God made a provision (through Moses) for them to do that in a respectful way. This is in stark contrast with homosexuality, which, throughout the entire Christian canon is characteristic of deep depravity (cf. Sodom, Rom. 1), and ...


5

First of all, there is a difference between a monk, or a nun, and a person in consecrated life more generally: monks and nuns belong to cloistered orders and don't generally go "out into the world", whereas sisters and brothers belong to orders which do work "in the world". In either case, though, there is generally a process by which a person joins: ...


4

In some cases the rules for a church annulment may coincide with the rules for a civil divorce, but not a civil annulment (those latter rules obviously depending on the jurisdiction in question). This would mean that someone would be able to be not married, in the eyes of both church and state, but while the state considered them divorced - that is, that ...


4

I know of no doctrine held by any Christian tradition based on this passages that speaks to virginity at the time of marriage in relation to possible divorce. It is simply not the subject matter of the passage and drawing such a conclusion from it would be bad hermeneutics. You would need to find other teachings on previous relationships or extra-marital ...


3

According to most Protestant denominations (plus a few non-Protestant ones) marriage is a God ordained relationship that should model Jesus relationship to the church. It is not primarily for personal pleasure or convenience, it is for holiness. No matter how one gets into it the expectation is that all marriages should be lived out to model more and more ...


3

Taking a look at what Jesus said: They say unto him, Why did Moses then command to give a writing of divorcement, and to put her away? 8 He saith unto them, Moses because of the hardness of your hearts suffered you to put away your wives: but from the beginning it was not so. At that time, the Jews were practicing divorce, on the basis that if the ...


3

what factors should a person take into account when forming their consciences to up and leave Well, there's this from Malachi 2:16: "I hate divorce," says the LORD God of Israel It's really hard to overstate that. The idea of "forming their conscience" to do something the Lord hates, even if you're only talking about the civil aspect, smacks of ...


3

"Marriage unfaithfulness" is not a term used in the Bible, so one would have to define it in order to determine a biblical answer. Where did you get the words from, and how were they used? Since you ask "What MIGHT the Bible refer to as marital unfaithfulness," then I would consider what the husband is supposed to do for the wife and fails to do it as ...


3

Marriage is more than sex. When you enter a marriage you take on all sorts of other obligations - to love and support your spouse, to care for them in sickness, to provide for your mutual needs, and to act as parent to any children you might have. If you deliberately choose to leave a marriage you are abandoning all those obligations as well as the one to ...


3

Let's start with a discussion of what the situation is, as the Church traditionally has seen and taught it: The official teaching of the Church is that civil divorce is usually immoral in itself, but may be morally tolerable under certain circumstances: If civil divorce remains the only possible way of ensuring certain legal rights, the care of the ...


2

First of all, if you are going to accept an answer from conservative biblical scholarship, you have to set aside the claim that Paul merely condemned "men acting/dressing like women." Romans 1:26-27 has been claimed to be addressing certain forms of sexual intercourse, not just dressing or acting like women. An additional point on this distinction is that ...


2

When we get married we take VOWS (promise) before GOD to LOVE, HONOR and CHERISH our spouse. By definition "unfaithfulness" - unfaithful — adj 1. not true to a promise, vow, etc 2. not true to a wife, husband, lover, etc, esp in having sexual intercourse with someone else 3. inaccurate; inexact; unreliable; untrustworthy: unfaithful copy 4. obsolete ...


2

The Bible does not give a lot on marriage, nor does it give a lot on divorce. In the book of Matthew Jesus gives us an idea of what God feels about the sanctity of marriage: Matthew 19:3 through 9 NKJV The Pharisees also came unto him, tempting him, and saying unto him, Is it lawful for a man to put away his wife for every cause? And he answered and said ...


2

I feel that this question can be answered without a list. Honestly I learned throughout many leadership courses in the Navy that the only foolish question is the one that remains unasked. Therefore I feel that at least a Scriptural answer to this question may be appropriate. In our culture today many see divorce as a positive solution to a troubled marriage. ...


2

The problem isn't the divorce, but the remarriage. If you simply get a divorce for a good reason, you are not in state of sin - although the divorce itself is a mortal sin. The real problem is remarriage. Modernist Catholics say divorcees who have not had annullment and have another partner can receive communion, but it has never been (and it never will be) ...


1

Athanasius has given a very thorough answer. For the less studious, let me give a simple answer: "Divorce" means ending a marriage. "Annulment" means declaring that no marriage existed in the first place. For example, if Mr Brown kidnaps Miss Green and forces her to go through a marriage at gunpoint, few would call this is a "real" marriage. If Miss Green ...


1

Your Question #1: Does adultery of the heart as described by Jesus in Matthew 5:28 constitute the same form of "sexual immorality" given as an exception for divorce being permissible in Matthew 19:9? No, but they're "kissin' cousins"! The thought is father to the deed. If you find yourself repeatedly fantasizing about "having an affair" with that woman ...


1

As to porn being a basis for divorce, I can only suspect someone might use this verse: Matthew 5:28 But I say unto you, That whosoever looketh on a woman to lust after her hath committed adultery with her already in his heart. And in combination with Jesus' one exception for the prohibition on divorce: "saving for the cause of fornication" (Matt ...


1

Jehovah's Witnesses believe adultery is the only appropriate reason for divorce. "You have heard the law that says, 'A man can divorce his wife by merely giving her a written notice of divorce.' But I say that a man who divorces his wife, unless she has been unfaithful, causes her to commit adultery. And anyone who marries a divorced woman also ...


1

I hope the following does indeed contribute to the answer.... Paul writes that an elder must be above reproach, blameless, the husband of one wife, manage his own family well etc from 1 Timothy 3 and Titus. A divorce is seen as causing serious question marks on these things for the man who has gone through such a tragedy. Since the qualifications from Paul ...



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