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26

Sin is not merely defined by one person encroaching on another person's rights. Pride, greed, envy, bitterness, and many other such things are sins, but they do not encroach on anyone else's rights. So, then, why are these considered sins by God? It seems the key point is that each of them is a departure from the righteousness of God. In the case of two ...


10

Indeed, AFAIK the Bible doesn't make any overt statements on this subject. It is, however, usually accepted that Mary was around 14 when giving birth, and was married at that time. In many ways it is perhaps fortunate that the Bible doesn't wax lyrical on the subject; your description of child marriage as a "horrible custom" sounds largely a product of ...


5

I know of no specific references in scripture to what age is "best" for marriage, though I have read historical accounts that state that the traditional age for marriage in ancient Jewish culture was the late teen years. Josephus might have something to say on the matter, and if he doesn't, I'm sure Edersheim does. It's also worth taking a historical view ...


3

I would think there are a few, given the nature of His position of authority over all creation. However, the question would be answered differently if you are referring to God as the Godhead (ie, the Trinity) or just as God the Father. If you are just referring to God the Father, then the answer is any form of submission. God commands us to submit to the ...


3

I don't think there is a definitive answer to your question as asked. You're not asking for an objective fact, like "what is the boiling point of hydrogen peroxide at sea level?" You're asking for a classification. Different people could classify the same things many different ways. Like suppose I asked you what different kinds of motor vehicle there are. If ...


3

The overly simple answer is: Natural Law is a human person's participation in the Eternal Law (the knowable part of which is called Divine Law). While Peter Turner's answer covered all of the essential points, St. Thomas Aquinas' coverage of the topic is the benchmark among the Doctors of the Catholic Church and one summary of it (among many, I am sure) ...


3

Biblical Laws are intended to be used by all governments and all governments do use them. Let everyone be subject to the governing authorities, for there is no authority except that which God has established. The authorities that exist have been established by God. Consequently, whoever rebels against the authority is rebelling against what God has ...


2

The question rests on a premis that is anti-thetical to Christianity. Namely, that Christianity is chiefly concerned with the actions of the individual, rather than his relationship with God. It is akin to asking whether all Germans must eat sauerkraut or if all French women must be thin. There may be a correlation, but there is nothing in the essence of ...


2

This is a complex subject because the Bible has various angles with 'punishment' so I will only summarize some various heads of them with some limited sample references.  First Christians, in a sense, are never to personally 'desire the punishment' of others. This is viewed as the sinful desire of revenge in that sense. But I tell you that anyone who is ...


2

Baptists, in particular, are vehemently opposed to any attempt by a secular government to create religious laws. One of the "Baptist Distinctives" (a term describing those principles that are generally held amongst all Baptists, as defined by the early Baptist confessions) is the "separation of church and state"1. Baptists, in particular, came of age in ...


2

Sin is not an idea or a component of a "moral system". God's laws are not based on a notion of right or wrong, but are based on God's personal nature and therefore how He wants us to be. This doesn't mean that it's not wrong to sin - you can say to a degree that it invariably is wrong to sin - but to stress that sin itself isn't about good/bad, ...


2

Sin is absolutely objective but in its application in our lives has a subjective element. The particular case that you mention is where Paul is saying if a person thinks something is a sin (even though it is not) then it is a sin to that person if they run about doing what their conscience condemns. This is because anything done without faith is a sin: ...


1

There is a good answer on the FAQ page for Grace Lutheran in Elgin, TX. A number of times, for example in the February 19, 2006 Biblog post commenting on Leviticus 13-15, you have said that some aspects of the law no longer apply to us. Can you explain how we know which parts of the law do still apply and which parts do not? A: A usual ...


1

What is and is not a sin is not subjective. Scripture gives a very clear definition of sin in 1 John 3:4. Sin is transgression of the Law. What is subjective is our understanding of what sin is. We're flawed finite creatures, with varying preconceptions, who are taught various different things (whether those things are right or wrong) and ...


1

The 10 commandments makes it very clear. Customs of that time may have been to have more than one wife like King David, but that is not God's best plan. Let every man have his own wife. Who can afford more than one nowadays. Who would seriously want to live with more than one. Adulterers, fornicators, liars, thieves, murderers will have their place in hell.


1

This response considers a few different questions, each of which is a variation of your original. (1) Does the bible teach that the church should punish people who break the laws of the government of the country in which they live? AFAIK, no; that's up to the government. However, Christians are to obey what are called "the laws of men" when they do not ...


1

From my experience and reading completely conflicting sources while having no formal education in the matter there seems to be two schools of thought on the matter One way of looking at it is this way: Here God's laws are on top and man's are on the bottom it's ordered by jurisdiction. Here the eternal law that is on top is the Unchangeable Nature of ...


1

The short answer to your question is to review the Haydock Commentary of the 3rd Chapter of Genesis. I feel like I should add more, but I'm not smart enough to top the incomparable Haydock commentary. Here are a couple short, relevant snippets: Ver. 1. Why hath God? Hebrew, "Indeed hath God, &c." as if the serpent had overheard Eve arguing with ...


1

Based on the Catholic Encyclopedia's definition of passion, passions themselves are neither good nor bad - they are simply an appetite that propels man towards a given end. The desire to "be like God" is in and of itself, not a bad thing. Passion The problem is not that Adam and Eve had a perverted passion, but rather that their passions were manipulated ...



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