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7

Lee McDonald says in The Biblical Canon that the most common criteria in identifying what was and wasn't canonical for the early church was apostolicity, orthodoxy, antiquity, and use, and adaptability and inspiration were also used to a lesser extent. David King, a UMC pastor, utilized McDonald's categories in a 2012 paper on the pericanonicity of the ...


6

You may find this link of interest: http://www.theropps.com/papers/Winter1998/regeneration.htm And here is the significant part, where they talk about the significance of running water and cold water: The main points here related to the topic of regeneration are (as in Ignatius' works) implicit, in a discussion primarily centered around the ...


5

Henry Chadwick writes about this in his book The Early Church (Penguin, 1993), on page 50. First he explains that the role of the "bishop" (episkopos) evolved to be a primus among the elders (presbyters) in the late apostolic or early post-apostolic era. But it would take a while until the bishop received a more formal recognition as a separate tier of ...


5

Since the Didache was discovered in the late 19th century, scholars have provided a number of rationales, ranging from the typical standards of canonicity (late age, mysterious authorship, poor quality) to its association with an early heresy. Age The simplest explanation that many scholars have provided, either directly or indirectly, is that the work was ...


4

While I admittedly don't have a book citation for this, my experience (I've also worked as a cantor and have volunteered in different roles in a few different parishes and I've had three kids baptized) is that pouring is the norm. In addition to my experience of the actual rite, I will also point out that most baptismal fonts are simply too small for ...


3

Dr. J. Carl Gregg stated: In the first century knowledge was decidedly more local. For example, scholars tell us that the Gospel of Luke can claim with presumed honesty to have “gathered [all available] primary sources as background research for writing his Gospel, but “these sources apparently did not include even a single copy of any of Paul’s letters, ...


3

In the record of the Lord's Prayer in Matthew 6, the additional phrase appears in the 1611 edition of the KJV, the Tyndale Bible, and, it appears, in the German Luther Bible of 1545. I can't read German, except for "Amen", but it looks like it's there. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, ...


2

Sort of? Strictly speaking it comes from the medieval manuscripts which the reformation theologians inherited, but it is not quite that simple. The text is clearly missing from the most ancient manuscripts of Matthew, but it was present in the Renaissance. Someone in some scriptorium added that passage at a later date. On the other hand, we know that the ...



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